Remote Work Arrangement (RWA) Guidelines

General Information and Guidelines for CCS Staff

(July 2021)

Overview

The College for Creative Studies (CCS) is committed to providing an in-person learning environment with face-to-face experiences for students and employees. An energetic in-person campus is necessary to learning and creating an engaging and dynamic campus culture. The College also recognizes the benefits of offering a remote work option for up to two days per week to some of its employees under appropriate circumstances and has established the Remote Work Arrangement (RWA) Guidelines. By allowing for remote work arrangements, CCS may be able to retain valued employees, attract quality applicants, increase productivity, improve morale, and optimize use of office space.

The RWA option is a six (6) month temporary pilot program, subject to be continued as is, with modifications or discontinued.

Guidelines

All academic and student support offices must be open and staffed for in-person assistance Monday through Friday during regular business hours. Supervisor approval is necessary for all RWA requests. Supervisors must provide, in writing on the RWA Request Form, their decision to approve or deny an RWA request. Any such decision should be based on the guidelines set forth below.

Guidelines for Supervisors

  1. Supervisors must determine an employee’s suitability for an RWA based on:
    • The nature of the employee’s position and the need for face-to-face interaction with students, co-workers, faculty, and clients/customers or vendors. Some positions do not qualify for RWA due to the nature of the work performed.
    • How student/faculty/staff/external partner interaction may be affected by an employee’s RWA.
    • The likelihood the employee will be able to perform the essential functions of the position while on an RWA at the same or higher level of performance as when not on an RWA.
    • The employee’s performance and disciplinary history. Employees with current performance or disciplinary concerns may not be eligible for an RWA.
  1. Remote Work Arrangements cannot exceed two days per week. RWAs are subject to be continued/discontinued, suspended, or modified at any time at the discretion of the supervisor. RWAs can also be discontinued if the College changes or terminates its policy with regard to RWAs.
  2. Supervisors should be careful to avoid unfairly distributing work to other employees in order to accommodate another employee’s RWA. An employee on an RWA is responsible for performing all of their own job duties.

Guidelines for Employees Seeking a Remote Work Arrangement

All employees should discuss their potential eligibility for an RWA with their supervisor. Eligible employees are required to submit the Remote Work Arrangement Form to their supervisor for consideration.

Employees Who Seek an RWA Must Comply with the Following:

  1. If working remotely, understand the expectations to perform your job duties remain the same as if you are working from your office (e.g., attend meetings remotely, interface with your co-workers as required, be responsive during established work hours, and complete assigned work timely).
  2. An RWA should not cause additional work for co-workers or your supervisor.
  3. Be available to work in person on campus if requested.
  4. Remote working cannot be used as an alternative method to provide dependent care. Employees need to ensure that dependent care responsibilities do not interfere with their agreed upon work schedule or completion of work.
  5. Employees accept responsibility for maintaining the security and confidentiality, if required, of all work-related information, data, documents, and other materials kept at their remote workplace or stored on personal electronic equipment. In the event of a breach of security or if CCS information is lost or stolen, the employee will immediately report the incident to their supervisor.
  1. For remote work, familiarize yourself with remote access and accessing your voicemail from off campus.

Extreme Winter Weather and Other Emergency Closures

In the event of a campus closure due to severe weather or other emergencies, the process for an employee working under an RWA is the same as it is with employees under a non-RWA. If the campus is closed, employees are not expected to work unless they have been identified by their supervisor as a critical infrastructure worker.

Overtime and Non-Exempt Employee Pay

Non-exempt employees are those who do not fit within any of the exemptions to the Fair Labor Standards Act. They receive overtime at the rate of one and one-half (1 ½) times the regular rate of pay for hours worked in excess of 40 in any one week, or as required by law. For non-exempt employees who have a 35 hour workweek, hours worked between the regularly scheduled 35 hours and 40 hours will be compensated at straight time rates. Hours over 40 in a workweek will be compensated at time and a half. Paid Time Off and College holidays do not count as hours worked and will not count toward overtime calculations. The College defined work week is 12:00 a.m. Sunday to 11:59 p.m. Saturday.

Any work above non-exempt employee’s scheduled hours must be approved by the employee’s supervisor in advance. Non-exempt employees who work overtime that is not authorized in advance will be paid for all time worked, but may be subject to disciplinary action.

Each non-exempt employee is responsible for his/her own time record keeping, and non-exempt employees must accurately report all hours worked. It is a violation of CCS policy for a non-exempt employee to record more hours than worked or fewer hours than worked. Likewise, it is a violation of CCS policy for anyone to instruct a non-exempt employee to record more or fewer hours than worked. Further, it is a violation of CCS policy to alter or falsify time records. CCS takes such offenses extremely seriously, and even a single violation may result in immediate termination of employment.

Non-exempt employees are entitled to paid rest periods and an unpaid meal period, which will be discussed with the employee’s supervisor. If an employee is not able to take his or her meal or break periods at the usual time on any given day, then they should be taken at a different time. Generally, employees must be completely relieved of all duties during the meal period and free to use the time as they choose. Employees should not be required to perform any work during meal or break periods. However, in the event that an employee does perform work due to business needs that arise during the meal or break period, the employee must be paid for the meal period or, to the extent allowed by law, the meal or break period will be extended. Meal periods must be reported accurately on employee timesheets, including both the start and end times to ensure that employees are properly compensated. Break times are not reported as they are paid.

Tuition Remission

Updated October 2018

After one year of service, employees, their spouses and dependents are eligible for tuition remission up to the equivalent of one full-time enrollment in College undergraduate and graduate programs per year. In addition, full-time employees and their spouses and dependents are eligible for tuition remission toward Precollege and Continuing Studies (PCS) classes. Audited courses do not qualify for tuition remission. Dependents are defined as spouses or children up to age 25, who can legally be claimed on the employee’s annual tax filings with the IRS.

Undergraduate and Graduate Courses

Employees, spouses and dependents will have the class tuition waived but will be responsible to pay for registration and appropriate course fees prior to beginning classes. Failure to make this payment or to sign up for a payment plan, will result in being withdrawn from all classes for the semester. To sign up for a payment plan, please click here.

Precollege and Continuing Studies Courses

For PCS classes, full-time employees, their spouses and dependents are eligible for tuition remission on a space available basis for the fall and winter semesters, as well as adult classes during the summer. Summer semester youth and teen classes will be available to eligible dependents of CCS full-time employees at a discounted tuition rate. Additional materials and various fees must be paid in full, along with the discounted tuition, when registering for the classes. Please contact the PCS office or Human Resources for the current discounted tuition rate.

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and CCS Scholarships and Grants

Employees, spouses and dependents receiving tuition remission must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by February 1st to determine eligibility for financial aid from the federal and state governments and the student must accept all federal and state scholarships and grants awarded. The FAFSA may be completed at www.fafsa.gov. The CCS Tuition Remission Voucher will cover the remaining eligible tuition after grants from the State of Michigan have been applied to the student’s tuition and mandatory fee charges. Funding from Federal Pell Grants and Federal Direct Stafford Loans may be refunded to the student after all applicable charges have been paid in full.

CCS scholarships and grants are not available if tuition costs are covered in full by tuition remission. If the student is eligible for a partial tuition remission, this amount is compared to the amount they may be eligible for in CCS scholarship and grant funds. The student will receive the higher of the two amounts.

Withdrawals, Dropped Courses, or Failing Grade

Employees, their spouse or dependents will be responsible for the tuition charges/surrender fees for a withdrawn, dropped, or failed course(s).

Employees should contact the Office of Human Resources to determine tuition remission eligibility and to obtain the Tuition Remission Voucher and instructions.

Alcohol and Other Drug Policy for Students, Faculty and Staff

(updated February 2020)

The College for Creative Studies is committed to providing a safe, healthy learning community for all its members. The College recognizes that the improper and excessive use of alcohol and other drugs may interfere with the College’s mission by negatively affecting the health and safety of students, faculty, and staff. Due to the harm caused by the excessive and illegal use of alcohol and other drugs, the College has a vested interest in establishing policies to prohibit unlawful behavior and sanctions to address policy violations by members of the CCS community.

Under the Drug-Free Workplace Act and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act, the College is required to have an alcohol and other drug policy and must distribute this policy annually to all employees and students. This Policy must outline the College’s prevention, education and intervention efforts, and consequences that may be applied by both the College and external authorities for policy violations. The law also requires that individuals be notified of possible health risks associated with the use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs, and sources of assistance for problems that may arise as a result of use.

Scope

This policy applies to all faculty and staff, as well as students enrolled in credit bearing and non-credit bearing courses at CCS, including any and all programs located off site. Guests, on campus or at College events, who are violating a College policy, may be asked to leave campus/the event and their CCS host will be held responsible for their guest’s actions.

Students visiting other countries to attend academic programs are reminded that they may be subject to arrest and legal sanctions for alcohol and drug offenses under the laws and regulations of that particular country or institution in addition to the judicial process of the College.

Definitions

The following terms are defined for the purposes of this policy and are important for purposes of expressing the College’s policy on a drug and alcohol-free environment:
College refers to the College for Creative Studies.

College activities include programs affiliated with the College, including study-abroad programs, and any on-campus or off-campus event or function conducted, approved, sponsored or funded, in whole or in part, by the College or any officially recognized student organization.

College premises includes all buildings and land owned, leased, or used by the College (including adjacent streets and sidewalks), and motor vehicles operated by employees, including personal motor vehicles, when used in connection with work performed for or on behalf of the College.

Controlled Substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of section 202 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), as further defined by regulations at 21 CFR 1300.11 through 1300.15.

Contract means a legal instrument reflecting a relationship between the federal government and a recipient whenever the principal purpose of the instrument is the acquisition by purchase, lease, or barter, of property or services for the direct benefit or use of the federal government; or whenever an executive agency determines in a specific instance that the use of a type of procurement contract is appropriate.

Conviction means finding of guilt (including a plea of nolo contendere) or imposition of sentence, or both, by any judicial body charged with the responsibility to determine violations of the federal or state criminal drug statutes.

Criminal drug statute means a federal or non-federal criminal statute involving the manufacture, sale, distribution, dispensation, use, or possession of any controlled substance.

Drug For the purpose of this Policy, the term “drug” includes:

  • controlled substances, as defined in 21 USC 812, which cannot be legally obtained
  • legally obtainable controlled substances which were not legally obtained, including:
  • Prescribed drugs when prescription is no longer valid (e.g. use of medication after a course of treatment is completed);
  • Prescribed drugs used contrary to the prescription;
  • Prescribed drugs issued to another person.

Federal agency or agency means any United States executive department, military department, government corporation, government controlled corporation, or any other establishment in the executive branch, or any independent regulatory agency.

Guest means a person who is not a direct member of the College community, such as a student or employee.

Host means the person who is responsible for a guest being on campus or at a College event.

Illicit drug use means the use, manufacture, sale, distribution, dispensation, or possession of illegal drugs.

Over the Counter Substances means items that are available for purchase from retailers that do not need a prescription.

Prescribed Drug means any substance prescribed for use by a licensed medical practitioner.

Student means an individual registered or enrolled for a credit or non-credit course or program offered by the College.

CCS Alcohol and Drugs Policy

All members of the CCS community also are governed by laws, regulations, and ordinances established by the state and local municipalities and will be held accountable by law enforcement representatives of those entities for any illegal activity. It is the responsibility of all campus members to be aware of these laws.

Alcohol

Employees, students, and campus guests, regardless of age, are expected to refrain from the possession, consumption or transportation of alcoholic beverages while on any part of the campus or at College-sponsored/supported events, while driving a College vehicle or while otherwise engaged in College business. Possession of an empty container of an alcoholic beverage will be dealt with as though the individual responsible for the empty container consumed the contents.

The only exception to this Policy is that individuals of legal age may consume alcohol on College property in a manner consistent with College policy and State of Michigan law within the approved designated area of events coordinated by the President of the College.  To request an exception to this Policy for events not coordinated by the President, approval must be obtained from the employee’s Vice President or Dean with final approval given by the President of the College using the Request for Approval to Serve Alcohol at a CCS Sponsored Event form (see link at the end of this paragraph).  For all College related events involving alcohol, a licensed, third-party bartender must be present to serve the alcohol and the bartender must refrain from using a tip jar.  

Drug/Controlled Substance

Students, CCS employees, and guests are prohibited from using, possessing, transferring or selling any illegal drug, controlled substance, or related paraphernalia, including hookahs, while on any part of the campus or at College-sponsored/supported events.

Any person taking prescription drugs or over-the-counter medication is personally responsible for ensuring that while taking such drugs or medications, he or she is not a safety risk to themselves and others while on College property while driving a College or privately owned vehicle, or while otherwise engaged in College business. It is illegal to misuse prescription medication, i.e. continue to use medication when the prescription is no longer valid, use prescribed drugs contrary to the prescription, and give or sell prescribed drugs to another person. Misusing prescription drugs can result in a conviction with jail time.

CCS Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Strategies

The College uses the following strategies to provide a positive influence on the campus culture regarding alcohol and drug abuse.

  • Students, employees, and campus guests, regardless of age, are expected to refrain from the possession, consumption or transportation of alcoholic beverages on campus. (see details and exceptions described in the above section)
  • Providing education and awareness activities
  • All student social, extracurricular, and public service options are substance-free
  • Prohibiting the marketing and promotion of alcohol and other drugs
  • Developing and enforcing campus policies and enforce laws to address high-risk and illegal alcohol and other drug use
  • Providing early intervention and referral for treatment

Health Risks

The use or abuse of alcohol and other drugs increases the risk for a number of health-related and other medical, behavioral and social problems. Below is a general description of the health risks associated with drug use.

ALCOHOL Can cause short-term effects such as loss of concentration and judgment; slowed reflexes; disorientation leading to higher risk of accidents and problem behavior; long-term effects include a risk of liver and heart damage, malnutrition, cancer and other illnesses; can be highly addictive to some persons.

AMPHETAMINES Can cause short-term effects such as rushed, careless behavior and pushing beyond your physical capacity, leading to exhaustion; tolerance increases rapidly; long-term effects include physical and psychological dependence and withdrawal can result in depression and suicide; continued high doses can cause heart problems, infections, malnutrition, and death.

CANNABIS Can cause short-term effects such as slow reflexes; increase in forgetfulness; alters the judgment of space and distance; aggravate pre-existing heart and/or mental health problems; long-term health effects include permanent damage to lungs, reproductive organs and brain function; can interfere with physical, psychological, social development of young users.

COCAINE (crack) Can cause short-term effects such as impaired judgment; increased breathing, heart rate, heart palpitations; anxiety, restlessness, hostility, paranoia, confusion; long-term effects may include damage to respiratory and immune systems; malnutrition, seizures, and loss of brain function; highly addictive.

DESIGNER DRUGS/SYNTHETIC CANNABINOIDS (bath salts, K2, spice) Can cause short-term effects such as elevated heart rate, blood pressure and chest pain; hallucinations, seizures, violent behavior and paranoia; may lead to lack of appetite, vomiting and tremor; long-term use may result in kidney/liver failure, increased risk of suicide and death.

HALLUCINOGENS (PCP, LSD, ecstasy, dextromethorphan) Can cause extreme distortions of what is seen and heard; induces sudden changes in behavior, loss of concentration and memory; increases risk of birth defects in user’s children; overdose can cause psychosis, convulsions, coma, and death. Frequent and long-term use can cause permanent loss of mental function.

INHALANTS (nitrous oxide, amyl nitrite, butyl nitrite, chlorohydrocarbons, hydrocarbons) Can cause short-term effects such as nausea, dizziness, fatigue, slurred speech, hallucinations or delusions; may lead to rapid and irregular heart rhythms, heart failure and death; long-term use may result in loss of feeling, hearing, and vision; can result in permanent damage to the brain, heart, lungs, liver and kidneys.

OPIATES/NARCOTICS (heroin, morphine, opium, codeine, oxycodone, china white) Can cause physical and psychological dependence; overdose can cause coma, convulsions, respiratory arrest, and death; long-term use leads to malnutrition, infection, and hepatitis; sharing needles is a leading cause of the spread of HIV and hepatitis; highly addictive, tolerance increases rapidly.

SEDATIVES Can cause reduced reaction time and confusion; overdose can cause coma, respiratory arrest, convulsions, and death; withdrawal can be dangerous; in combination with other controlled substances can quickly cause coma and death; long-term use can produce physical and psychological dependence; tolerance can increase rapidly.

TOBACCO (cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco) Can cause diseases of the cardiovascular system, in particular smoking being a major risk factor for a myocardial infarction (heart attack), diseases of the respiratory tract such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and emphysema, and cancer, particularly lung cancer and cancers of the larynx and mouth; nicotine is highly addictive.

For an extensive list of health-related risks please visit The National Institute on Drug Abuse: http://www.drugabuse.gov/

Counseling and Treatment Programs

Students

All students are encouraged to seek help early if they feel they have a problem with drugs and/or alcohol and to learn how to assist others with substance abuse problems. With early assistance, it is less likely that serious consequences will result from an alcohol or drug problem.

The College offers the following alcohol and drug abuse services:

Information and Referral
All students are eligible to consult with the professional staff of the Wellness Center; personal counselors and/or health care professional, regarding the availability of drug abuse assistance programs. Drug and alcohol abuse counseling and rehabilitation program referrals are made to mutual help organizations, private hospitals, public treatment programs, and private drug treatment practitioners.

Individual Counseling
Individuals are seen on a short-term basis for assistance with drug-related problems. However, it is likely that students will be referred out for alcohol and drug dependence. This service is available to students at no charge.

Contact Information
Personal Counseling – 313-664-7852 or 313-664-7838
College Nurse – 313-664-7982

Employees

Alcohol and drug abuse rehabilitation and assistance programs are available through the College’s health benefits program and Ulliance (employee assistance program) with both in-patient and out-patient programs. Employees with alcohol or drug abuse problems are strongly encouraged to participate in these programs. Employees may contact the Office of Human Resources to seek counseling assistance and/or referral to an appropriate outside agency. All communications between employees and CCS or outside agencies are strictly confidential.

Contact Information
Human Resources – 313-664-7652
Ulliance (Employee Assistance Program) – 888-333-6269
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan – 800-637-2227
Blue Care Network – 800-662-6667

Community Resources

Narcotics Anonymous – www.na.org

Alcoholics Anonymous – www.aa.org

Al-anon – www.al-anon.alateen.org
For friends, relatives and domestic partners who are coping with a loved one’s alcohol or drug use.

Drug Free Detroit – www.drugfreedetroit.org

CCS Sanctions

The use or abuse of alcohol and other drugs also increases the risks for behavioral and social problems such as negative effects on academic work performance; conflicts with co-workers, classmates, family, friends and others; conduct problems resulting in disciplinary action, including loss of employment or dismissal from an academic program; and legal problems resulting in ticketing, fines and imprisonment.

Students

When a student is found responsible for violating the CCS Alcohol and Other Drug Policy, their case will be evaluated and an appropriate sanction will be implemented.

The sanctions described are minimum sanctions and do not limit the disciplinary power of the College in any matter involving Code of Conduct violations.

A Warning is a written notification that a particular action is not acceptable.

Disciplinary Probation is a formal written notice that a student is in poor judicial standing with the College.

Loss of College Housing Eligibility (if applicable) is the termination of a student’s admissibility to live in College housing.

Suspension is the termination of an individual’s status as a student, with the loss of all rights and privileges, for a specific time period.

Dismissal is the permanent termination of an individual’s status as a student, with the loss of all rights and privileges.

Community Service Hours is a required number of hours to be worked in unpaid College or public service within a specific period of time.

Educational Project is a project that is focused on educating the student about a particular issue.

Employees

CCS will take appropriate action, up to and including immediate termination, with employees in violation of this policy. Employees are notified that action under this policy may include requiring successful participation in an alcohol or drug rehabilitation or assistance program as a condition of continued employment.

External Sanctions

Federal Law

Violations of laws and ordinances may result in misdemeanor or felony convictions accompanied by the imposition of legal sanctions, which include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Fines as determined under local, state, or federal laws;
  • Imprisonment, including up to life imprisonment, for possession or trafficking of drugs such as heroin, cocaine, marijuana and prescription drugs;
  • Forfeiture of personal and real property;
  • Denial of federal benefits such as grants, contracts and student loans;
  • Loss of driving privileges;
  • Required attendance at substance abuse education or treatment programs.

A full description of federal sanctions for drug felonies can be found at https://www.dea.gov/drug-policy-information. This section is not intended as legal advice; consult with an attorney regarding your specific legal issues.

Michigan Law

Alcohol: Under Michigan law, it is illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to purchase, consume or possess, or have any bodily content of alcohol. A first-time conviction may result in a fine, substance abuse education and treatment, community service and court-ordered drug screenings. There also is a provision for possible imprisonment or probation for a second or subsequent offense. Use of false identification by minors in obtaining alcohol is punishable with a fine, loss of driver’s license, probation and community service.

Individuals can be arrested and/or convicted of operating a vehicle while intoxicated with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level of .08 or higher. If a student is under 21, there is a “zero tolerance” law in the state of Michigan, and any blood alcohol level of .01 or higher can lead to a minor in possession (MIP) citation as well as being cited for operating a vehicle while intoxicated, if applicable. This is in addition to the suspension of driving privileges in the State of Michigan.

Medical Amnesty: To better ensure that minors at medical risk as a result of alcohol intoxication will receive prompt and appropriate medical attention, the State of Michigan provides for medical amnesty to remove perceived barriers to calling for or seeking help.

Michigan law continues to prohibit a minor from purchasing, consuming, or possessing, or attempting to purchase, consume, or possess, alcoholic liquor and from having any bodily alcohol content. The medical amnesty law provides an exemption from prosecution for the following:

  • A minor (under the age of 21) who, after consuming alcohol, voluntarily presents himself or herself to a health facility or agency for treatment or observation, including medical examination and treatment for any condition as a result of sexual assault (as defined in Michigan law).
  • Any minor (under the age of 21) who accompanied a minor (under the age of 21) who, after consuming alcohol, voluntarily presented himself or herself to a health facility or agency for treatment or observation, including medical examination and treatment for any condition as a result of sexual assault (as defined in Michigan law).
  • Any minor (under the age of 21) who initiated contact with law enforcement or emergency medical services personnel for the purpose of obtaining medical assistance in connection with a legitimate health care concern.

Michigan Laws Governing Marijuana: Michigan marijuana laws conflict with federal criminal laws governing controlled substances, as well as federal laws requiring institutions receiving federal funds, by grant or contract, to maintain drug-free campuses and workplaces. CCS receives federal funding that would be in jeopardy if those federal laws did not take precedence over state law. Thus the use, possession or cultivation of marijuana in any form and for any purpose continues to violate the CCS Alcohol and Drug Policy and is prohibited.

State of Michigan Legal Sanctions for Illegal Use, Possession and/or Delivery of Controlled Substances

(Act No. 368 of the Public Acts of 1978)

State of Michigan Sanctions for Violation of Drug Laws Narcotic Drug and Cocaine:

Delivery and Possession – Felony, Mandatory 10 years to life.

Use less than 50 grams – Misdemeanor, up to 1 year and/or $2,000 fine.

Hallucinogens:

Delivery – Felony, up to 7 years and/or $5,000 fine.

Possession – Misdemeanor, up to 1 year and/or $1,000 fine.

Use – Misdemeanor, up to 6 months and/or $100 fine.

Marijuana:

Delivery – Felony, up to 4 years and/or $2,000 fine.

Possession – Misdemeanor, up to 1 year and/or $1,000 fine.

Use – Misdemeanor, up to 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Other Controlled Substances:

Delivery – Felony, up to 7 years and/or $1,000 – $5,000 fine.

Possession – Misdemeanor or felony, up to 2 years and/or $1,000 – $2,000 fine.

Use – Misdemeanor, up to 1 year and/or $100 – $1,000 fine.

State of Michigan Sanctions for Violation of Alcohol Laws Sale to Minors:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Minor Possessing or Transporting in Motor Vehicle:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Furnishing Fraudulent ID to Minor/Use of Fraudulent ID by Minor:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Consumption on/in Public Highways, Parks or Places of Amusement:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Open Alcohol in Vehicles on Highways:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Purchase, Possession or Consumption by Minor:

(Civil Citation) : First violation not more than $25.00; Second violation not more than $50.00 (or participate in a substance abuse program) ; Third and subsequent violation not more than $100.00 (or participate in a substance abuse program) .

Selling Without a License:

Misdemeanor, 1 year and/or $1,000 fine.

Selling or Furnishing Alcohol to a Minor:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

State of Michigan Sanctions for Drinking/Driving Offenses Operating a Motor Vehicle with Ability Impaired: (depends on number of offenses)

Operating a Motor Vehicle Under the Influence of Intoxicating Liquor:

Operating a motor vehicle with unlawful blood alcohol level of 0.10 grams or more per 100 milliliters of blood: Up to $1,000 fine, up to 1 year in jail, 10 to 90 days community service, license suspended for 90 days to 2 years or 5 years of a revoked license. If death caused, the offense becomes a felony.

Employee Reporting Requirement

Under the Drug-Free Workplace Act, in addition to the other requirements of this Policy, the College requires all employees who work in any capacity under a federal grant or contract to notify his or her supervisor or department head in writing of his or her conviction for a violation of any criminal drug statute occurring in the workplace or on work-related activities no later than five (5) calendar days after such conviction. The supervisor or department head will notify the Office of Human Resources.

Distribution of Policy

A copy of this Policy statement will be distributed to all faculty, staff and students annually via email at the beginning of fall semester.

Review of the College’s Prevention Program and Policy

Annually, the College shall review its Alcohol and Other Drug Policy and prevention strategies to determine effectiveness and to ensure that the College’s disciplinary sanctions are consistently enforced. This annual review will be conducted in May and the minutes from the review are available to students and employees upon request.

For More Information

For more information concerning this Policy, employees should contact the Office of Human Resources at 313-664-7652 and students should contact the Office of Student Affairs at 313-664-7879.

Paid Time Off

Eligibility

Full-time and part-time employees who work at least ten hours per week are eligible to accrue Paid Time Off (PTO) according to the schedule below. PTO must be scheduled and approved in advance by the employee’s supervisor, except for last minute illnesses, injury or emergencies. Part-time staff that work less than 10 hours per week and temporary employees or contractors are not eligible for PTO.

Accruals

PTO is accrued at the following rates for full-time employees:

Employee TypeCalendar years
beginning prior to
completion of 5
years of full-time
status
Calendar years
beginning after
completion of 5 years of
full-time status
Full Time 12 Month Employee24 days per year31 days per year
Full Time 10 Month Employee20 days per year26 days per year
Full Time 9 Month Employee18 days per year24 days per year

Part-Time employees accrue 1 PTO day for every month worked. For example, a part-time 12 month employee will accrue 12 workdays per year and a part-time 9 month employee will accrue 9 workdays per year. Exceptions apply for part-time employees that work intermittently.

New Hires During First Partial Calendar Year of Employment

At the time of hire, employees will have zero hours of PTO in their PTO bank, and they will begin accruing hours in every paycheck.  They may use it as soon as it as soon as it is deposited into their bank, but they cannot use more PTO than they will accrue in a year.

Existing Employees

On the first and each subsequent January 1 after hire, employees will have their PTO entitlement for the entire upcoming calendar year deposited into their PTO bank and available for immediate use.  Although it will be available for immediate use, it will be earned on a pro-rated basis each paycheck.

For example, a 12-month employee who has worked for CCS less than five years will have 24 days of PTO depositing into their PTO bank on January 1.  The employee can begin using this immediately, even before it is earned.  On February 1, the employee will have earned two days of PTO; on March 1, the employee will have earned another two days of PTO, etc.  Except in the first partial year of employment, employees are permitted to take more PTO than they have earned at the time they take the PTO only in an emergency situation, as approved by the Director of HR.  An employee who does so will be considered to have a “negative PTO balance.”

PTO will be prorated accordingly when an employee is hired or terminates mid-month. When hired on or before or terminated on or after the 15th of the month, a full month’s accrual will be credited. If hired after the 15th of the month or terminated before the 15th of the month, no PTO will be accrued for the month. An employee may carryover a maximum of 1 year of PTO into the new calendar year. Excess PTO that is not taken and cannot be carried over will be forfeited.

Using PTO

Employees should follow their department procedures when requesting time off. Non-exempt employees may take PTO in increments as small as 1 hour. Exempt employees may take PTO in increments as small as one-half day. All PTO is to be used before time is taken without pay. If an employee has a negative PTO balance at the end of the year due to borrowing from the following year, the negative balance will be pulled from the PTO the employee receives in their bank as of January 1.  An employee’s PTO balance may not be more than two weeks in the negative.

Please note that even if an employee has PTO available, excessive use of unscheduled time off is disruptive and may lead to disciplinary action.  See Attendance and Timeliness policy. CCS’s PTO policy is intended to and will be interpreted to comply with the provisions of Michigan’s Paid Medical Leave Act.

PTO in Conjunction with STD and Worker’s Compensation

  1. A six working days waiting period is required before short term disability begins to pay any benefits. Employees are required to use their PTO during the six day waiting period. Employees will not accrue PTO while on Short Term Disability, but they will accrue PTO during the six working day waiting period when PTO is used. If the six working days waiting period when PTO is used ends on or after the 15th of the month, PTO will be accrued for that month. If the six working days waiting period when PTO is used ends before the 15th of the month, PTO will not be accrued for the month.  An employee cannot use PTO to bring their pay up to 100% if they are receiving less than 100% of their pay through the Short-Term Disability program.
  2. An employee receiving benefits under workers’ compensation will not be paid from both PTO and workers’ compensation for the same hours. However, an employee can supplement workers’ compensation pay with PTO to meet their full salary.

Payout of PTO

Payment of earned, unused PTO time will be made at the employee’s regular rate of pay when employment terminates. If a negative PTO balance exists at the time of termination, the employee’s last pay will be reduced by this amount (subject to compliance with applicable state law).

Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) is a federal law requiring covered employees be paid at least the federal minimum wage for all hours worked and overtime pay (generally computed at time and one-half the regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 hours in a workweek), unless the employee falls into one of several designated exemptions.  To qualify for exemption, employees generally must meet certain tests regarding their job duties and, for some exemptions, be paid on a salary basis at not less than the minimum designated by the FLSA.  Job titles do not determine exempt status.  In order for an exemption to apply, an employee’s specific job duties and salary must meet all the requirements of the FLSA.  You will be advised whether your position is classified as exempt (and not subject to the minimum wage and/or overtime provisions of FLSA) or nonexempt (and subject to the minimum wage and overtime provisions of FLSA) at the time you are hired.

To qualify for many exemptions applicable at CCS, employees must be paid on a salary basis.  Consistent with CCS’s long-standing policy and practice, exempt employees are paid on a salary basis as required by law.  Being paid on a “salary basis” means an employee regularly receives a predetermined amount of compensation each pay period on a weekly, or less frequent, basis.  Absent an exception listed below, the predetermined amount cannot be reduced because of variations in the quality or quantity of the employee’s work and an exempt employee must receive the full salary for any workweek in which the employee performs any work, regardless of the number of days or hours worked.  However, exempt employees do not need to be paid for any workweek in which they perform no work.  Generally, if the employer makes deductions for an employee’s predetermined salary because of the operating requirements of the business, that employee is not paid on a “salary basis.”  That is, if the employee is ready, willing and able to work, deductions typically may not be made for time when work is not available.

Personnel Records – Staff / Faculty

Staff

A master personnel record containing administrative staff records and other pertinent data is maintained in the Human Resources office. The Human Resources office maintains records concerning employment, performance, payroll, benefits, and other miscellaneous items. No information, except verification of employment dates, will be released to outside sources without the employee’s written authorization, unless disclosure is required by subpoena or court order or is necessary to meet some legal obligation of CCS. A written authorization from the employee is required for the Human Resources office to release salary information.

It is each administrative staff member’s responsibility to inform the Human Resources office of any changes in the following: name, address, telephone, marital status, dependents, beneficiaries, and emergency contacts.

Administrative staff have the right to review their Personnel Record in the Human Resources office, with a prior appointment. These Personnel Records are confidential and may only be reviewed by the administrative member, or the appropriate supervisory personnel of the administrative staff member.

Faculty

A master personnel record containing faculty records and other pertinent data is maintained in the Human Resources office. The Human Resources office maintains records concerning employment, performance, payroll, benefits, and other miscellaneous items. The Academic Affairs Office also maintains records on each faculty member which include: Full-Time Faculty Annual Reports, Department Chair Annual Reviews of Full-Time Faculty, faculty member’s resume, and correspondence. No information, except verification of employment dates, will be released to outside sources without the employee’s written authorization, unless disclosure is required by subpoena or court order or is necessary to meet some legal obligation of CCS. A written authorization from the employee is required for the Human Resources office to release salary information.

It is each faculty member’s responsibility to inform the Human Resources office of any changes in the following: name, address, telephone, marital status, dependents, beneficiaries, and emergency contacts.

Faculty members have the right to review their Personnel Record in the Human Resources office or their file in the Academic Affairs Office, with a prior appointment. These Personnel Records are confidential and may only be reviewed by the faculty member, or the appropriate supervisory personnel of the faculty member.

Children in the Workplace

All College employees, including faculty, staff, and students, may occasionally experience the need to bring children to campus. The following guidelines are established to clarify the College’s practice regarding such situations.

Employees and students who are responsible for the care of minor children are expected to arrange childcare away from the workplace and campus. The College does not condone bringing children into the workplace and on campus, except as provided below. The College accepts no responsibility for the actions of children on campus; the parents or custodians assume all such responsibility. Bringing children into the workplace or classroom creates a distraction, for the parent or custodian, for other employees and for students, impeding the performance of College duties and could also endanger the child. The immediate supervisor or instructor will counsel or notify employees or students who bring children to campus without proper authorization in advance.

Exceptions for Employees

Employees may bring children to campus under the following conditions:

An employee is coming to campus for a short visit, or errand, of less than two (2) hours:

  • delivering College-related work (forms, reports, grades, pay a bill, etc.)
  • bringing a new baby to introduce to co-workers
  • other casual, informal College business with co-workers
  • College for Creative Studies sponsored special events

Other conditions to bring children to campus will need approval from the immediate supervisor and Director of Human Resources.

Exceptions for Students

  • delivering College-related work (forms, registration, reports, grades, pay a bill, etc.)
  • bringing a new baby, outside of class time, to introduce to classmates, instructors
  • College for Creative Studies sponsored special events

Other conditions to bring children to campus will need approval from the Dean of Students.

Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

Purpose

The College affords eligible employees family or medical leave in accordance with the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).  All rights and obligations under the FMLA and this policy are interpreted according to the law.  All leave of absence, including workers’ compensation, temporary disability and FMLA leaves, will be coordinated and will run concurrently as allowed by law.

The Leave Policy

You may be eligible for a job-protected, unpaid leave of absence for up to twelve (12) weeks each leave year if you:

  1. have been employed by CCS for at least 12 months (the months need not be consecutive);
  2. worked at least 1,250 hours of service in the 12 months immediately preceding the leave; and
  3. are taking the leave for a qualifying reason.

A leave year is defined as the rolling 12-month period measured backward from the date you first took FMLA leave.  During FMLA leave, you will be entitled to group health benefits as if you were still working.  Upon completion of FMLA leave, you will be restored to your same or equivalent job with the same pay, benefits and conditions of employment.  After 12 weeks, the FMLA provisions regarding job restoration do not apply.  If your leave exceeds 12 weeks, your right to job restoration and/or benefits, if any, will be determined by CCS’s existing policies and any applicable laws, including the Americans with Disabilities Act.  Please note that CCS’s short-term and long-term disability plans are income protection plans for eligible employees and do not guarantee a job, or any particular job, following an absence.

Reasons for Leave

FMLA leave may be taken for any of the following reasons:

  1. the birth of a son or daughter and in order to care for such child;
  2. the placement of a child with you for adoption or foster care;
  3. to care for your spouse, child or parent (“covered relation”) with a serious health condition; or
  4. because your own serious health condition renders you unable to perform the essential functions of your position.
  5. because of a “qualifying exigency” arising out of active duty or a call to covered active duty of a covered relation in the Armed Forces or:
  6. to care for a covered relation or next of kin who is a covered service member and has incurred a serious injury or illness in the line of duty while on active duty in the Armed Forces, including the National Guard or Reserves.

FMLA leave may not exceed 12 weeks per leave year, except where the leave is to care for an injured or ill service member, in which case an eligible employee may take up to 26 workweeks of leave during a single 12-month period to care for the service member.  Leave to care for an injured or ill service member, when combined with other FMLA-qualifying leave, may not exceed 26 weeks on a single 12-month period.  A leave to care for a newborn son or daughter or due to the placement with you of a foster or adopted son or daughter must conclude within 12 months of the birth or placement.  Spouses who both work for CCS will be entitled to a combined 12 weeks of FMLA in a given leave year when leave is take for the birth of a child, placement of a child for adoption or foster care, or care of a parent with a serious health condition.  Similarly, spouses who both work for the College may take only a combined 26 workweeks of leave to care for a covered service member with a serious injury or illness.

A child includes a biological, adopted, foster or stepchild (or legal ward) who is under 18 years old.  Children over 18 who are incapable of self-care because of physical or mental disability are also included.  (However, where leave is due to a qualifying exigency arising out of active duty or a call to active duty or to care for an injured or ill service member, there is no age limit on the child).  A “parent” includes your biological parent or person who stood in the position of parent to you when you were a child.  A parent does not include your spouse’s parent.

“Spouse” as defined in the FMLA, means a husband or wife as defined or recognized in the state where the individual was married and includes individuals in a same-sex marriage or common law marriage.  Spouse also includes a husband or wife in a marriage that was validly entered into outside of the United States if the marriage could have been entered into in at least one state.

A “serious health condition” is an illness, injury, impairment, or physical or mental condition that involves either an overnight stay in a medical care facility, or continuing treatment by a health care provider for a condition that either prevents the employee from performing the functions of the employee’s job, or prevents the qualified family member from participating in school or other daily activities.  Subject to certain conditions, the continuing treatment requirement may be met by a period of incapacity of more than three consecutive calendar days combined with at least two visits to a health care provider or one visit and a regimen of continuing treatment, or incapacity due to pregnancy, or incapacity due to a chronic condition.  Other conditions may meet the definition of continuing treatment.

A “qualifying exigency” means short-notice deployment (notice of seven days or less), military events, child care and school activities, financial and legal arrangements, counseling, rest and recuperation, post-deployment activities, and additional activities where CCS and the employee agree.

“Covered active duty” means, in the case of a member of a regular component of the Armed Forces, duty during the deployment of the member with the Armed Forces to a foreign country, and, in the case of a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, duty during the deployment of the member with the Armed Forces to a foreign country under a call or order to active duty.

A “covered service member” is (1)  a member of the Armed Forces, including the National guard or Reserves, who is undergoing medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy, is otherwise in outpatient status, or is otherwise in the temporary disability retired list, for a serious injury or illness or (2) a veteran who is undergoing medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy, for a serious injury or illness and who was a member of the Armed Forces, including the National Guard or Reserves, at any time during the period of five years preceding the date on which the veteran undergoes that medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy.

A “serious injury or illness” is one that was incurred in the line of duty on active duty (or existed before the beginning of active duty and was aggravated by service in the line of duty on active duty) and that may render the service member medically unfit to perform duties of the member’s office, grade, rank, or rating.  With respect to a veteran who was a member of the Armed Forces at any time during the period of five years preceding the date on which the veteran undergoes medical treatment, recuperation or therapy, a serious injury or illness means that qualifying injury or illness that was incurred in the line of duty on active duty or existed before the beginning of active duty and was aggravated by service in the line of duty and that manifested itself before or after the member became a veteran.

Use of Paid Leave

In general, FMLA leave is unpaid.  However, CCS generally requires that you substitute any paid leave (assuming you are eligible for paid leave) for unpaid leave.  Your entitlement to up to 12 weeks of FMLA leave will run concurrently with any workers’ compensation or temporary disability absence as long as the criteria for a serious health condition is met.  You may use any available unused paid time off (PTO) to supplement your worker’s compensation or temporary disability pay, up to 100% of your regular pay.

Notice of Leave

If it is foreseeable that you will need FMLA leave, you must give CCS at least 30 days’ advance written notice.  If your need for FMLA leave, or the timing of the leave, is unforeseeable, you must give CCS notice as soon as practicable, generally within two business days after the need for leave becomes known to you.  You are also expected to comply with CCS’s normal call-in or reporting practices and procedures.  Failure to give the required notice may result in the delay of your leave.  If the leave is due to planned medical treatment, you must make a reasonable effort to schedule the treatment to minimize disruption to CCS.  Requests for leave must be submitted to Human Resources and forms are available in that office.

Medical and Family Certificates

If you request leave because of your own or a covered relation’s serious health condition, you and the relevant health care provider must supply an appropriate medical certification to CCS.  You may obtain Medical Certification forms from Human Resources.  Generally, for foreseeable leave, any required medical certification must be provided to Human Resources before your leave begins, unless it is impractical to do so, in which case a medical certification must be provided as soon as possible. Also, if the leave is for the birth, placement of a child for adoption or foster care, or care of a covered relation, CCS may require you to provide reasonable documentation or a statement confirming the family relationship.  In addition, if you are requesting leave for a qualifying exigency related to military service, you may be required to provide an appropriate certification.  Failure to timely provide the requested medical certification or other documentation may result in a delay or denial of your leave.

CCS may, at its discretion and expense, require an examination by a second health care provider designated by CCS.  If the second health care provider’s opinion conflicts with the original medical certification, CCS may require a third, mutually acceptable health care provider to conduct an examination and provide a binding opinion.  (Second and third opinions will not be requested for a covered service member’s serious injury or illness, however.)

Notice:  The Genetic Information nondiscrimination act of 2008 (GINA) prohibits employers and other entities covered by GINA Title II from requesting or requiring genetic information of an individual or family member of the individual, except as specifically allowed by this law.  To comply with this law, we are asking that you not provide any genetic information when responding to requests for medical information.  “Genetic information” as defined by GINA, includes an individual’s family medical history, the results of an individual’s or family member’s genetic tests, the fact that an individual or an individual’s family member sought or received genetic services, and genetic information of a fetus carried by an individual or an individual’s family member or an embryo lawfully held by an individual or family member receiving assistive reproductive services.

Reporting During Leave and Upon Return From Leave

If you take an FMLA leave due to your own or a covered relation’s serious health condition, CCS will require you to provide medical re-certifications, at reasonable intervals during your leave, generally not more than every 30 days. While on an FMLA leave, you must periodically report on your status and intent to return to work.  If the circumstances precipitating the need for an FMLA leave change while you are on leave, you must promptly notify the Human Resources office in writing of those changes, generally within two (2) business days.

CCS will require you to provide a certificate of fitness to return to work, which may address your ability to perform the essential functions of your job, at your expense, when your leave was due to your own serious health condition. A fitness to return to work certificate will not be required if the leave was taken on an intermittent or reduced schedule basis. Failure to timely provide the above status reports, re-certifications or fitness to return to work certificates may result in the delay or denial of leave, or restoration to your position.

Medical and Other Benefits During Leave

During an approved FMLA leave, CCS will maintain your group health benefits as if you continue to work. All other benefits will be maintained in accord with CCS established policies.  Paid time off (PTO) days do not accrue during leaves of absence, including FMLA and temporary disability absences (except during the time period that the leave is being covered by PTO).

If you normally pay a portion of your group health or other elective benefit premium, and if you are on a paid leave, CCS will deduct your portion of the health plan premium as a regular payroll deduction.  If your leave is unpaid, you must pay your portion of the premium to the Human Resources office by the 20th day of the month prior to the month the premium will cover.  Failure to timely pay your portion of the premium may result in termination of coverage, provided you are notified in advance that coverage will lapse.  If CCS pays your portion of any elective benefit premium or group health premium during your leave, CCS will seek reimbursement from you when you return to work.

If you do not return to work at the end of the leave period, you will be required to reimburse CCS for its share of the premiums paid for maintaining your group health benefits during any unpaid leave, unless you cannot return to work due to a serious health condition or other circumstances beyond your control.

Intermittent and Reduced Schedule Leave

Leave may be taken intermittently (in separate blocks of time due to a single health condition) or on a reduced leave schedule (reducing the usual number of hours you work) when medically necessary.  Employees must make reasonable efforts to schedule leave for planned medical treatment so as not to unduly disrupt CCS’s operations.  Leave for qualifying exigencies may also be taken on an intermittent basis.

If your leave is unpaid, CCS will reduce your salary as permitted by law based upon the amount of time actually worked.  In some situations, while you are on an intermittent or reduced schedule leave, CCS may temporarily transfer you to an available alternative position (with equivalent pay and benefits) that better accommodates your leave request.  Intermittent or reduced schedule leave to care for a newborn child or child placed with you for adoption or foster care requires prior consent of CCS (unless the leave is due to a serious health condition).

Special FMLA Rules Applicable to Instructional Employees

The FMLA contains special rules for instructional employees who seek intermittent leave or a leave near the end of an academic term.  “Instructional employees” include, for example, faculty members. Generally, teacher assistants and counselors are not considered instructional employees.  The purpose of the special rules is to avoid undue disruption to students.  If the special rules apply to you, CCS may require you to remain on leave until the end of the semester.  If you have requested intermittent or reduced schedule leave, CCS may require that you take leave in a block of time or it may temporarily transfer you to another position.  If you have any questions regarding these special FMLA rules and whether they apply to you, contact Human Resources.

Additional Information

The FMLA makes it unlawful for any employer to interfere with, restrain, or deny the existence of any right provided under the FMLA or discharge or discriminate against any person for opposing any practice made unlawful by FMLA or for involvement in any proceeding under or relating to FMLA.  An employee may file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor or may bring a private lawsuit against an employer.  FMLA does not affect any Federal or State law prohibiting discrimination, or supersede and State or local law or collective bargaining agreement which provides greater family or medical leave rights.  If you have any questions regarding this policy, please contact Human Resources.

CCS reserves the right to modify this policy when circumstances warrant modification, or to change any provision of this policy as determined by CCS in its discretion, consistent with the FMLA and any other applicable law.