Social Media

The following are guidelines for placing CCS-related content on social media sites.

Departmental Social Accounts

Getting Started

Before creating your official CCS social media channel, please send a proposal to Marketing & Communications for review and approval. All accounts must be approved through the Office of Marketing & Communications, who will provide governance, oversight and advice to all department social media administrators. If your account predates this new process, we are requesting that all existing accounts go through this same approval process. Approvals will be sent back within two business weeks. Please consider the following questions when considering a new social account:

  • What are your goals for the account?
  • Who is your target audience?
  • What platform are you hoping to use & why?
  • How often are you going to post?
  • What kind of content will you post?
  • Are you able to provide enough content to maintain a social presence year-round?
  • How will this support the college as a whole as well as the individual department/office?
  • Do you have the time to do this well?

Account Management and Monitoring

Every departmental social account needs at least one, full-time staff or faculty member managing it. To prevent lapses in engagement or turnover, please add CCS’s Social Media Manager as an admin to the account and be sure to share your login information as well. CCS’ Social Media Manager reserves all rights to review and remove inappropriate content and to shut down inactive accounts.

Content Owners are responsible for posting and using content and maintaining compliance with CCS policies and all local, state and federal laws, including but not limited to: the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the Federal Trade Commission Act, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA), U.S. copyright law and the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).

Social Media Do’s

  • Catalogue and retain an official account inventory and contact info for everyone who is posting/involved.
  • Create, maintain and monitor content on respective social media platforms and engage with users.
  • Post consistent, clear, quality content
  • Moderate content that violates hosting terms of service or is of a threatening/harassing nature.
  • Follow CCS’s main accounts and share when appropriate.
  • Ensure all content is relevant to the goals and objectives and upholds the standards and brand pillars of CCS.

Social Media Don’ts

  • Make sure you answer comments and direct messages in a timely manner. The common courtesy rule at CCS is no longer than 24 hours. Also, make sure your responses are courteous, professional and conversational.
  • Don’t post content that violates any laws or regulations.
  • Don’t use the College’s brand/name to endorse any view, product, private business, cause or political candidate.
  • Don’t represent personal opinions as college-endorsed views/policies.
  • Don’t promote external third-party fundraisers that do not directly benefit CCS. If you are approached about promoting a third-party fundraiser, please talk to Institutional Advancement and Marketing and Communications before moving forward.

Brand Standards and Style Guide

CCS social accounts need to convey our brand and be representative of a world-class art and design institution. To ensure that, follow these simple brand guidelines:

  • We need to make sure our account names are consistent. For undergraduate programs, please name your account ccs_departmentname. Ex: ccs_artpractice, ccs_photography, ccs_transportation. For graduate programs, please name your account ccsmfa_departmentname. Ex: ccsmfa_integrateddesign
  • Make sure you have a profile picture that is an official CCS departmental logo created and approved by the Marketing & Communications office.
  • Include the College’s main handle in your bio (ex. @ccs_detroit Product Design Department)
  • Your biography or about section should reflect your department description found on your CCS department site.
  • Follow CCS’s Style Guide [link] when designing posts, stories, etc. Consider using our official fonts, the official CCS colors, logos, etc.
  • When it comes to text – less is more! Images with too much text do not perform as well on social media.

Images

A few things to consider when posting:

  • Are your images sized correctly for posting?
  • Are your images crisp and clear?
  • Do your images properly represent the College and your department?
  • Can your image easily be cropped to 1:1?

Gifs: Gifs are fun and engaging. CCS Marketing & Communications has a library of them at your disposal.

Going “Live”

It is often useful to use live video to share demonstrations, guest lectures or other content. Please connect with CCS Marketing and Communications for guidance if needed.

Hashtags and Tagging

Hashtags are very important. It’s an easy way to connect your content to a specific topic, event, theme or conversation. Hashtags also make it easier to discover posts around specific topics, because hashtags aggregate all social media content with that same hashtag.

We request you use the following hashtags when posting:

#ccsdetroit      #ccsalumni      #ccsfamily

Be sure to tag the official @ccs_detroit account on all posts. This will give the Marketing & Communications team an opportunity to see all posts and share on the main account, when appropriate. Mentioning and tagging brings awareness to additional pages from the CCS community. Tagging also shows your content to a broader audience — the audience of both your account and the page you tag — meaning your message will reach more people.

Personal Social Accounts

CCS employees are welcome to represent CCS on their personal social accounts using the following guidelines:

Including CCS in your profile is one way to spread the word – but doing so means agreeing to act professionally on your account. Clearly identify yourself as an employee of the College in any business-related discussions. Be respectful and note that your opinions do not represent the views and opinions of CCS, unless specifically authorized to do so.

Sensitive information should never be shared via social platforms (yes, even over Direct Messages). Similar to College email, employees should have no expectation of privacy when using or posting on social media websites

Be aware of liability. You are legally liable for what you post on your own sites and on others.
Be selective. Not everything needs a response. When you see criticism of the college online, don’t feel compelled to respond. If you have the ability to correct an error or factually incorrect statement, or give someone direction to a webpage that does so, that’s helpful. If you feel there is a post or comment that is sensitive and needs response, forward it to your supervisor or to CCS’s Social Media Manager.

Community Standards

CCS has established a set of community standards to govern all participation in our social media accounts, which are administered and moderated by Marketing & Communications. 

Additionally, individual departments that administer social accounts across any social media channels reserve the right to delete comments, replies or other content and interactions that they deem to be in violation of CCS’s social media community standards or in violation of the social media platforms’ community standards. The administrators may also take action to report, block or ban users from social media platforms for violations. 

Social media submissions that will be removed and reported may include, but are not limited to:

  • Harassing, intimidating or threatening comments to another person
  • Comments that incite violence or other action in violation of any federal or state anti-discrimination laws
  • Sexually explicit and sexually vulgar language and profanity
  • Comments that promote illegal activity
  • Comments that include false or defamatory information
  • Posts that misrepresent or hide the poster’s identity
  • Comments that violate privacy or confidentiality
  • Comments unrelated to the topic or to the College community
  • Repetitive comments and spam posts

Grade Change Forms

An instructor may change a student’s grade. The reason for this change may be due to completion of work from the previous semester (grade of “I” being changed to a letter grade) or a review of the student’s work which resulted in a better grade. A student who receives an “I” grade has one semester (Fall or Winter) to complete the work and receive the appropriate grade. After the one semester deadline, the “I” grade will be changed to an “F”. Instructors, Program Managers or the student may pick up the grade change form from the Academic Advising and Registration Office. However, only the instructor may return the form to the Academic Advising and Registration Office. The instructor and Department Chair must sign the form. Instructors must provide complete and accurate information to ensure quick processing.

Students may appeal a grade up to 60 days after the last day of the semester in which the student was enrolled in the course. Appealing students should submit a written request to the Office of Academic Affairs identifying the course, instructor, and an explanation of the circumstances and reason for the request. The request will be reviewed and decided upon by the Academic Performance Committee.

Class Rosters

Taking attendance is a mandatory requirement and must be done electronically through the WebAdvisor system (see Appendix L). The preliminary class rosters are passed out as a courtesy for you to have on the first day of class. The first week of each semester is an add/drop period during which students may drop courses for which they previously registered or register for new courses with no penalty. After the add/drop period instructors must access their attendance roster online. Instructors are required to maintain attendance records electronically, which must be submitted at the end of the semester along with final grades. The roster includes all students registered in your class(es) through the end of the add/drop period.

If there is a person in your class who is NOT on your roster, it means the student is NOT REGISTERED for your class. It is imperative that you immediately send them to the Academic Advising and Registration office. Students are not permitted to be in your class unless they have officially registered for that class.

Faculty will begin to receive a weekly “drop notice” via email to inform you of any student who has officially withdrawn from your class(es). If there is a student listed on your roster who is not attending class you must contact the Academic Advising and Registration Office, and they will inquire why he/she has not been attending.

In addition, you may notice a “V” next to the names of some students on your roster. This means the students receive benefits from the U.S. Dept of Veterans Affairs. The VA requires attendance rosters, and it is the instructor’s responsibility to monitor this. The Academic Advising and Registration Office must report non-attendance of these students to the VA within 30 days of the last date of attendance. Instructors must report any “V” student who has missed three (3) weeks of class as soon as he/she misses the third week.

Registration Procedures

New Students:
New students receive a letter welcoming them to the College along with their username and password. Students are sent electronic communication from their academic advisor with directions on how to register along with an academic evaluation. New Students are encouraged to register online via WebAdvisor or in person with their Academic Advisor. WebAdvisor is a secure Web interface that allows students and faculty to access information contained in the college’s administrative database. For example, students can view their grades and transcript, search for open classes, view account balance information and print degree audits. Faculty members can view their class rosters, their scheduled classes, student information, and enter grades.

Returning Students:
Returning students are emailed an academic evaluation from the Academic Advising and Registration Office. The Advisor audits the student’s academic evaluation. If the student is on track with their academic program they are free to register in person or on-line. If the Advisor detects a concern with the academic evaluation, they place an advising hold on the student’s record. The student is then required to meet with their Academic Advisor to consult about their schedule. Once the hold is removed, the student may register online or at the Academic Advising and Registration Office. All students must pay a $100 commitment fee in order to register.

Academic Advising and Registration Office

The Registrar and the Director of Academic Advising manage the Academic Advising and Registration Office. The Academic Advising and Registration Office advises students on all aspects of their academic programs. It also is responsible for processing registration forms, enrollment verification forms, deferments, mid-term and final grades, grade changes, name and address changes, transcript requests, waivers, curriculum change forms, and degree audit files. The office produces schedule books for the fall, winter, and summer semesters, evaluates academic credits for transferability, audits prospective graduates’ files, maintains student records, oversees Veterans’ eligibility, maintains course equivalency guides, and maintains attendance records.

Dean’s or President’s List

Undergraduate students who complete a minimum of 12 credits during any semester and who attain a grade point average of 3.50 to 3.799 are placed on the Dean’s List. Students who achieve a GPA of 3.80 or above are placed on the President’s List. A notation will be placed on the student’s transcript for each semester that Dean’s List status is achieved.

Course Repetitions

A student may repeat a course in which credit has been earned in order to improve their grade. When a course is repeated, the higher grade will be used in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average. Any course, or its equivalent transfer course, may be applied only once toward fulfillment of any and all degree requirements, including elective credit. Work from previous attempts at the course cannot be reused in future attempts without written approval from the faculty member teaching the repeated course.

Waived Course

A required course may be waived by the Department Chair only. Waiving a course means only that the specific course is waived, not the credits attached to that course. The student must still plan to take a course to fill the credit deficiency. The Program Chair must complete a Curriculum Change form to indicate which course will replace the waived course. The Curriculum Change form is then submitted to the Academic Advising and Registration Office.

Smoking

State and local laws prohibit smoking in all parts of College buildings. City ordinance prohibits smoking within 15 feet of any building entrance.

In the interest of providing a safe and healthy environment for all staff, faculty, students and visitors, and in accordance with the Michigan Clean Indoor Act and the City of Detroit Smoking Pollution Control Ordinance, smoking is prohibited in all CCS buildings and within 15 feet of all building entrances and air intakes.

Enforcement of Policy

The success of this policy depends upon the thoughtfulness, consideration and cooperation of smokers and non-smokers. Students are encouraged to ask offending smokers to stop smoking. Any student smoking in a non-smoking area must immediately stop upon being requested to do so. Failure to do so will result in formal disciplinary action as outlined below.

Complaints

Complaints regarding the smoking of faculty and staff should be made to the Department Chair, the employee’s immediate supervisor or the Director of Human Resources. Complaints regarding students smoking should be made to the Director of Student Life.

Disciplinary Action

All student complaints should be made in writing to the Dean of Students. The Dean of Students will notify the student in writing that a complaint has been issued. A second offense will result in a $50 fine. A third offense will result in a $100 fine. Further violations will be subject to CCS disciplinary policies, up to and including expulsion.

Students wishing to contest the above may do so in writing to the Office of Student Affairs. Evidence of non-violation should be attached.

Alcohol and Other Drug Policy for Students, Faculty and Staff

(updated February 2020)

The College for Creative Studies is committed to providing a safe, healthy learning community for all its members. The College recognizes that the improper and excessive use of alcohol and other drugs may interfere with the College’s mission by negatively affecting the health and safety of students, faculty, and staff. Due to the harm caused by the excessive and illegal use of alcohol and other drugs, the College has a vested interest in establishing policies to prohibit unlawful behavior and sanctions to address policy violations by members of the CCS community.

Under the Drug-Free Workplace Act and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act, the College is required to have an alcohol and other drug policy and must distribute this policy annually to all employees and students. This Policy must outline the College’s prevention, education and intervention efforts, and consequences that may be applied by both the College and external authorities for policy violations. The law also requires that individuals be notified of possible health risks associated with the use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs, and sources of assistance for problems that may arise as a result of use.

Scope

This policy applies to all faculty and staff, as well as students enrolled in credit bearing and non-credit bearing courses at CCS, including any and all programs located off site. Guests, on campus or at College events, who are violating a College policy, may be asked to leave campus/the event and their CCS host will be held responsible for their guest’s actions.

Students visiting other countries to attend academic programs are reminded that they may be subject to arrest and legal sanctions for alcohol and drug offenses under the laws and regulations of that particular country or institution in addition to the judicial process of the College.

Definitions

The following terms are defined for the purposes of this policy and are important for purposes of expressing the College’s policy on a drug and alcohol-free environment:
College refers to the College for Creative Studies.

College activities include programs affiliated with the College, including study-abroad programs, and any on-campus or off-campus event or function conducted, approved, sponsored or funded, in whole or in part, by the College or any officially recognized student organization.

College premises includes all buildings and land owned, leased, or used by the College (including adjacent streets and sidewalks), and motor vehicles operated by employees, including personal motor vehicles, when used in connection with work performed for or on behalf of the College.

Controlled Substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of section 202 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), as further defined by regulations at 21 CFR 1300.11 through 1300.15.

Contract means a legal instrument reflecting a relationship between the federal government and a recipient whenever the principal purpose of the instrument is the acquisition by purchase, lease, or barter, of property or services for the direct benefit or use of the federal government; or whenever an executive agency determines in a specific instance that the use of a type of procurement contract is appropriate.

Conviction means finding of guilt (including a plea of nolo contendere) or imposition of sentence, or both, by any judicial body charged with the responsibility to determine violations of the federal or state criminal drug statutes.

Criminal drug statute means a federal or non-federal criminal statute involving the manufacture, sale, distribution, dispensation, use, or possession of any controlled substance.

Drug For the purpose of this Policy, the term “drug” includes:

  • controlled substances, as defined in 21 USC 812, which cannot be legally obtained
  • legally obtainable controlled substances which were not legally obtained, including:
  • Prescribed drugs when prescription is no longer valid (e.g. use of medication after a course of treatment is completed);
  • Prescribed drugs used contrary to the prescription;
  • Prescribed drugs issued to another person.

Federal agency or agency means any United States executive department, military department, government corporation, government controlled corporation, or any other establishment in the executive branch, or any independent regulatory agency.

Guest means a person who is not a direct member of the College community, such as a student or employee.

Host means the person who is responsible for a guest being on campus or at a College event.

Illicit drug use means the use, manufacture, sale, distribution, dispensation, or possession of illegal drugs.

Over the Counter Substances means items that are available for purchase from retailers that do not need a prescription.

Prescribed Drug means any substance prescribed for use by a licensed medical practitioner.

Student means an individual registered or enrolled for a credit or non-credit course or program offered by the College.

CCS Alcohol and Drugs Policy

All members of the CCS community also are governed by laws, regulations, and ordinances established by the state and local municipalities and will be held accountable by law enforcement representatives of those entities for any illegal activity. It is the responsibility of all campus members to be aware of these laws.

Alcohol

Employees, students, and campus guests, regardless of age, are expected to refrain from the possession, consumption or transportation of alcoholic beverages while on any part of the campus or at College-sponsored/supported events, while driving a College vehicle or while otherwise engaged in College business. Possession of an empty container of an alcoholic beverage will be dealt with as though the individual responsible for the empty container consumed the contents.

The only exception to this Policy is that individuals of legal age may consume alcohol on College property in a manner consistent with College policy and State of Michigan law within the approved designated area of events coordinated by the President of the College.  To request an exception to this Policy for events not coordinated by the President, approval must be obtained from the employee’s Vice President or Dean with final approval given by the President of the College using the Request for Approval to Serve Alcohol at a CCS Sponsored Event form (see link at the end of this paragraph).  For all College related events involving alcohol, a licensed, third-party bartender must be present to serve the alcohol and the bartender must refrain from using a tip jar.  

Drug/Controlled Substance

Students, CCS employees, and guests are prohibited from using, possessing, transferring or selling any illegal drug, controlled substance, or related paraphernalia, including hookahs, while on any part of the campus or at College-sponsored/supported events.

Any person taking prescription drugs or over-the-counter medication is personally responsible for ensuring that while taking such drugs or medications, he or she is not a safety risk to themselves and others while on College property while driving a College or privately owned vehicle, or while otherwise engaged in College business. It is illegal to misuse prescription medication, i.e. continue to use medication when the prescription is no longer valid, use prescribed drugs contrary to the prescription, and give or sell prescribed drugs to another person. Misusing prescription drugs can result in a conviction with jail time.

CCS Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Strategies

The College uses the following strategies to provide a positive influence on the campus culture regarding alcohol and drug abuse.

  • Students, employees, and campus guests, regardless of age, are expected to refrain from the possession, consumption or transportation of alcoholic beverages on campus. (see details and exceptions described in the above section)
  • Providing education and awareness activities
  • All student social, extracurricular, and public service options are substance-free
  • Prohibiting the marketing and promotion of alcohol and other drugs
  • Developing and enforcing campus policies and enforce laws to address high-risk and illegal alcohol and other drug use
  • Providing early intervention and referral for treatment

Health Risks

The use or abuse of alcohol and other drugs increases the risk for a number of health-related and other medical, behavioral and social problems. Below is a general description of the health risks associated with drug use.

ALCOHOL Can cause short-term effects such as loss of concentration and judgment; slowed reflexes; disorientation leading to higher risk of accidents and problem behavior; long-term effects include a risk of liver and heart damage, malnutrition, cancer and other illnesses; can be highly addictive to some persons.

AMPHETAMINES Can cause short-term effects such as rushed, careless behavior and pushing beyond your physical capacity, leading to exhaustion; tolerance increases rapidly; long-term effects include physical and psychological dependence and withdrawal can result in depression and suicide; continued high doses can cause heart problems, infections, malnutrition, and death.

CANNABIS Can cause short-term effects such as slow reflexes; increase in forgetfulness; alters the judgment of space and distance; aggravate pre-existing heart and/or mental health problems; long-term health effects include permanent damage to lungs, reproductive organs and brain function; can interfere with physical, psychological, social development of young users.

COCAINE (crack) Can cause short-term effects such as impaired judgment; increased breathing, heart rate, heart palpitations; anxiety, restlessness, hostility, paranoia, confusion; long-term effects may include damage to respiratory and immune systems; malnutrition, seizures, and loss of brain function; highly addictive.

DESIGNER DRUGS/SYNTHETIC CANNABINOIDS (bath salts, K2, spice) Can cause short-term effects such as elevated heart rate, blood pressure and chest pain; hallucinations, seizures, violent behavior and paranoia; may lead to lack of appetite, vomiting and tremor; long-term use may result in kidney/liver failure, increased risk of suicide and death.

HALLUCINOGENS (PCP, LSD, ecstasy, dextromethorphan) Can cause extreme distortions of what is seen and heard; induces sudden changes in behavior, loss of concentration and memory; increases risk of birth defects in user’s children; overdose can cause psychosis, convulsions, coma, and death. Frequent and long-term use can cause permanent loss of mental function.

INHALANTS (nitrous oxide, amyl nitrite, butyl nitrite, chlorohydrocarbons, hydrocarbons) Can cause short-term effects such as nausea, dizziness, fatigue, slurred speech, hallucinations or delusions; may lead to rapid and irregular heart rhythms, heart failure and death; long-term use may result in loss of feeling, hearing, and vision; can result in permanent damage to the brain, heart, lungs, liver and kidneys.

OPIATES/NARCOTICS (heroin, morphine, opium, codeine, oxycodone, china white) Can cause physical and psychological dependence; overdose can cause coma, convulsions, respiratory arrest, and death; long-term use leads to malnutrition, infection, and hepatitis; sharing needles is a leading cause of the spread of HIV and hepatitis; highly addictive, tolerance increases rapidly.

SEDATIVES Can cause reduced reaction time and confusion; overdose can cause coma, respiratory arrest, convulsions, and death; withdrawal can be dangerous; in combination with other controlled substances can quickly cause coma and death; long-term use can produce physical and psychological dependence; tolerance can increase rapidly.

TOBACCO (cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco) Can cause diseases of the cardiovascular system, in particular smoking being a major risk factor for a myocardial infarction (heart attack), diseases of the respiratory tract such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and emphysema, and cancer, particularly lung cancer and cancers of the larynx and mouth; nicotine is highly addictive.

For an extensive list of health-related risks please visit The National Institute on Drug Abuse: http://www.drugabuse.gov/

Counseling and Treatment Programs

Students

All students are encouraged to seek help early if they feel they have a problem with drugs and/or alcohol and to learn how to assist others with substance abuse problems. With early assistance, it is less likely that serious consequences will result from an alcohol or drug problem.

The College offers the following alcohol and drug abuse services:

Information and Referral
All students are eligible to consult with the professional staff of the Wellness Center; personal counselors and/or health care professional, regarding the availability of drug abuse assistance programs. Drug and alcohol abuse counseling and rehabilitation program referrals are made to mutual help organizations, private hospitals, public treatment programs, and private drug treatment practitioners.

Individual Counseling
Individuals are seen on a short-term basis for assistance with drug-related problems. However, it is likely that students will be referred out for alcohol and drug dependence. This service is available to students at no charge.

Contact Information
Personal Counseling – 313-664-7852 or 313-664-7838
College Nurse – 313-664-7982

Employees

Alcohol and drug abuse rehabilitation and assistance programs are available through the College’s health benefits program and Ulliance (employee assistance program) with both in-patient and out-patient programs. Employees with alcohol or drug abuse problems are strongly encouraged to participate in these programs. Employees may contact the Office of Human Resources to seek counseling assistance and/or referral to an appropriate outside agency. All communications between employees and CCS or outside agencies are strictly confidential.

Contact Information
Human Resources – 313-664-7652
Ulliance (Employee Assistance Program) – 888-333-6269
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan – 800-637-2227
Blue Care Network – 800-662-6667

Community Resources

Narcotics Anonymous – www.na.org

Alcoholics Anonymous – www.aa.org

Al-anon – www.al-anon.alateen.org
For friends, relatives and domestic partners who are coping with a loved one’s alcohol or drug use.

Drug Free Detroit – www.drugfreedetroit.org

CCS Sanctions

The use or abuse of alcohol and other drugs also increases the risks for behavioral and social problems such as negative effects on academic work performance; conflicts with co-workers, classmates, family, friends and others; conduct problems resulting in disciplinary action, including loss of employment or dismissal from an academic program; and legal problems resulting in ticketing, fines and imprisonment.

Students

When a student is found responsible for violating the CCS Alcohol and Other Drug Policy, their case will be evaluated and an appropriate sanction will be implemented.

The sanctions described are minimum sanctions and do not limit the disciplinary power of the College in any matter involving Code of Conduct violations.

A Warning is a written notification that a particular action is not acceptable.

Disciplinary Probation is a formal written notice that a student is in poor judicial standing with the College.

Loss of College Housing Eligibility (if applicable) is the termination of a student’s admissibility to live in College housing.

Suspension is the termination of an individual’s status as a student, with the loss of all rights and privileges, for a specific time period.

Dismissal is the permanent termination of an individual’s status as a student, with the loss of all rights and privileges.

Community Service Hours is a required number of hours to be worked in unpaid College or public service within a specific period of time.

Educational Project is a project that is focused on educating the student about a particular issue.

Employees

CCS will take appropriate action, up to and including immediate termination, with employees in violation of this policy. Employees are notified that action under this policy may include requiring successful participation in an alcohol or drug rehabilitation or assistance program as a condition of continued employment.

External Sanctions

Federal Law

Violations of laws and ordinances may result in misdemeanor or felony convictions accompanied by the imposition of legal sanctions, which include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Fines as determined under local, state, or federal laws;
  • Imprisonment, including up to life imprisonment, for possession or trafficking of drugs such as heroin, cocaine, marijuana and prescription drugs;
  • Forfeiture of personal and real property;
  • Denial of federal benefits such as grants, contracts and student loans;
  • Loss of driving privileges;
  • Required attendance at substance abuse education or treatment programs.

A full description of federal sanctions for drug felonies can be found at https://www.dea.gov/drug-policy-information. This section is not intended as legal advice; consult with an attorney regarding your specific legal issues.

Michigan Law

Alcohol: Under Michigan law, it is illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to purchase, consume or possess, or have any bodily content of alcohol. A first-time conviction may result in a fine, substance abuse education and treatment, community service and court-ordered drug screenings. There also is a provision for possible imprisonment or probation for a second or subsequent offense. Use of false identification by minors in obtaining alcohol is punishable with a fine, loss of driver’s license, probation and community service.

Individuals can be arrested and/or convicted of operating a vehicle while intoxicated with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level of .08 or higher. If a student is under 21, there is a “zero tolerance” law in the state of Michigan, and any blood alcohol level of .01 or higher can lead to a minor in possession (MIP) citation as well as being cited for operating a vehicle while intoxicated, if applicable. This is in addition to the suspension of driving privileges in the State of Michigan.

Medical Amnesty: To better ensure that minors at medical risk as a result of alcohol intoxication will receive prompt and appropriate medical attention, the State of Michigan provides for medical amnesty to remove perceived barriers to calling for or seeking help.

Michigan law continues to prohibit a minor from purchasing, consuming, or possessing, or attempting to purchase, consume, or possess, alcoholic liquor and from having any bodily alcohol content. The medical amnesty law provides an exemption from prosecution for the following:

  • A minor (under the age of 21) who, after consuming alcohol, voluntarily presents himself or herself to a health facility or agency for treatment or observation, including medical examination and treatment for any condition as a result of sexual assault (as defined in Michigan law).
  • Any minor (under the age of 21) who accompanied a minor (under the age of 21) who, after consuming alcohol, voluntarily presented himself or herself to a health facility or agency for treatment or observation, including medical examination and treatment for any condition as a result of sexual assault (as defined in Michigan law).
  • Any minor (under the age of 21) who initiated contact with law enforcement or emergency medical services personnel for the purpose of obtaining medical assistance in connection with a legitimate health care concern.

Michigan Laws Governing Marijuana: Michigan marijuana laws conflict with federal criminal laws governing controlled substances, as well as federal laws requiring institutions receiving federal funds, by grant or contract, to maintain drug-free campuses and workplaces. CCS receives federal funding that would be in jeopardy if those federal laws did not take precedence over state law. Thus the use, possession or cultivation of marijuana in any form and for any purpose continues to violate the CCS Alcohol and Drug Policy and is prohibited.

State of Michigan Legal Sanctions for Illegal Use, Possession and/or Delivery of Controlled Substances

(Act No. 368 of the Public Acts of 1978)

State of Michigan Sanctions for Violation of Drug Laws Narcotic Drug and Cocaine:

Delivery and Possession – Felony, Mandatory 10 years to life.

Use less than 50 grams – Misdemeanor, up to 1 year and/or $2,000 fine.

Hallucinogens:

Delivery – Felony, up to 7 years and/or $5,000 fine.

Possession – Misdemeanor, up to 1 year and/or $1,000 fine.

Use – Misdemeanor, up to 6 months and/or $100 fine.

Marijuana:

Delivery – Felony, up to 4 years and/or $2,000 fine.

Possession – Misdemeanor, up to 1 year and/or $1,000 fine.

Use – Misdemeanor, up to 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Other Controlled Substances:

Delivery – Felony, up to 7 years and/or $1,000 – $5,000 fine.

Possession – Misdemeanor or felony, up to 2 years and/or $1,000 – $2,000 fine.

Use – Misdemeanor, up to 1 year and/or $100 – $1,000 fine.

State of Michigan Sanctions for Violation of Alcohol Laws Sale to Minors:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Minor Possessing or Transporting in Motor Vehicle:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Furnishing Fraudulent ID to Minor/Use of Fraudulent ID by Minor:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Consumption on/in Public Highways, Parks or Places of Amusement:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Open Alcohol in Vehicles on Highways:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Purchase, Possession or Consumption by Minor:

(Civil Citation) : First violation not more than $25.00; Second violation not more than $50.00 (or participate in a substance abuse program) ; Third and subsequent violation not more than $100.00 (or participate in a substance abuse program) .

Selling Without a License:

Misdemeanor, 1 year and/or $1,000 fine.

Selling or Furnishing Alcohol to a Minor:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

State of Michigan Sanctions for Drinking/Driving Offenses Operating a Motor Vehicle with Ability Impaired: (depends on number of offenses)

Operating a Motor Vehicle Under the Influence of Intoxicating Liquor:

Operating a motor vehicle with unlawful blood alcohol level of 0.10 grams or more per 100 milliliters of blood: Up to $1,000 fine, up to 1 year in jail, 10 to 90 days community service, license suspended for 90 days to 2 years or 5 years of a revoked license. If death caused, the offense becomes a felony.

Employee Reporting Requirement

Under the Drug-Free Workplace Act, in addition to the other requirements of this Policy, the College requires all employees who work in any capacity under a federal grant or contract to notify his or her supervisor or department head in writing of his or her conviction for a violation of any criminal drug statute occurring in the workplace or on work-related activities no later than five (5) calendar days after such conviction. The supervisor or department head will notify the Office of Human Resources.

Distribution of Policy

A copy of this Policy statement will be distributed to all faculty, staff and students annually via email at the beginning of fall semester.

Review of the College’s Prevention Program and Policy

Annually, the College shall review its Alcohol and Other Drug Policy and prevention strategies to determine effectiveness and to ensure that the College’s disciplinary sanctions are consistently enforced. This annual review will be conducted in May and the minutes from the review are available to students and employees upon request.

For More Information

For more information concerning this Policy, employees should contact the Office of Human Resources at 313-664-7652 and students should contact the Office of Student Affairs at 313-664-7879.