Student Domestic Travel

Policy Statement, Purpose, and Scope

The College for Creative Studies encourages student exploration and travel. Off-campus experiences support institutional learning outcomes and expand students’ experience and perspective. The College seeks to ensure the safety of students and mitigate risks associated with off-campus exploration; hence, this policy and its adjacent procedures were established to offer minimum requirements for student travel. Additional standards may be enacted for specific trips by the Trip Leader or Responsible Administrator.

The Student Domestic Travel Policy establishes guidelines to ensure adequate College oversight of travel programs, maintain quality and consistency among programs, and allow for appropriate response should an emergency arise. The purpose of the policy is to ensure that adequate planning, supervision, and organization is in place for safe student domestic travel and to firm an approval and accountability structure.  

This policy applies to domestic travel of any enrolled students to attend activities or events that are:

  • Organized or sponsored by the College for Creative Studies, or travel in which the students act as representatives of the College, and
  • Occurring off the CCS campus and/or extending overnight.
  • This policy does not apply to travel undertaken for internships, student teaching, observations, residencies, or research (unless the research is organized by a faculty member). Travel undertaken by students who are also College employees traveling in their capacity as employees is not covered in this policy and will be handled in the same manner as employee travel.

CCS Student Domestic Travel requires a named Trip Leader, Trip Coordinator, and Responsible Administrator. These parties will ensure that travel is planned and executed in accordance with the CCS Student Domestic Travel Policy and Guidelines and will manage issues as they arise.

Reason for Policy

This policy ensures the consistent handling and oversight of student domestic travel. It provides clear instructions related to approvals and accountability and creates guidelines to ensure the safety of all participants.

Definitions

Academic Travel provides opportunity for students to meet learning outcomes for a course of study or prepare for a specified career path (i.e. conferences, portfolio reviews, studio tours)

The Clery Act is a consumer protection law that provides transparency related to crime policy and statistics. CCS is required to disclose any crime information that occurs on or near campus, or on non-campus property the College has entered an agreement to use (i.e. reserved lodging, agreed upon use in a host facility).

The College defines co-curricular learning as learning activities, programs, and experiences that reinforce the institution’s mission and values and complement the formal curriculum. Examples of Co-Curricular Travel may include student-faculty research experiences, service learning, professional clubs or organizations, career services, etc.

An Enrolled Student is any CCS student, graduate, undergraduate, non-matriculating, or PreCollege and Continuing Studies, who is enrolled in courses at the College, including College break periods and summers between enrolled periods. Only CCS staff, faculty, and enrolled students may participate in College-sponsored domestic student travel. If an exception is necessary, the approval of the Responsible Administrator is required.

The Responsible Administrator is a Dean, Department Chair, Director of an administrative unit, or their delegate who offers approval for the travel and any associated expenditures, as well as authorizing policy exceptions.

A Trip Leader is typically a full-time faculty or staff member(s) responsible for trip planning, student preparation, and supervision of students on the trip. Adjunct Instructors or part-time employees must be approved by the Responsible Administrator prior to the trip being approved.

The Trip Coordinator is the staff member responsible for oversight of trip planning and execution. The Coordinator will work with the Trip Leader to complete Business Services documentation and aid with trip planning and reservations as needed.

Title IX –The College subscribes to the principle of equal opportunity in its employment, admissions, and educational practices, including travel, and strives to provide an educational environment and workplace free from unlawful harassment or discrimination. Discrimination, including harassment, because of age, race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, disability or any other characteristic protected by law is strictly prohibited.

Academic Travel

Student travel can be an important component of a student’s learning experience at CCS. Class field trips and departmental group travel can enhance the content of a course or academic endeavor by providing experiences that cannot be conveyed in a classroom. As the intent of academic travel is usually to meet learning outcomes for a course of study or prepare for a specified career path, faculty are expected to act as Trip Leaders.

  1. Chaperones are required for all College-sponsored student domestic travel. A full outline of the chaperone policy, including the number of students allowed per chaperone, can be found here. Any exceptions to this requirement should be requested through the Chaperone Waiver form found at the above link.
  2. Field trips that are expected for a course must be listed on the class syllabus.
  3. Funding for Student Domestic Travel, including field trips, comes from the involved students and the department if additional funding is required. The faculty may submit a Student Domestic Travel Funding Request to the Office of Academic Affairs after receiving approval from the Department Chair. All monies due from students for a given trip must be paid to CCS before leaving on the trip, with no exceptions. Subsequent to the trip, proper accounting, including all appropriate receipts, must be made of all funds expended. The forms to be used in this accounting may be obtained from the Business Office.

Co-Curricular Travel

Co-Curricular travel can foster the development of soft or cross-cutting skills such as teamwork, communication, problem solving, and interpersonal relations.

The requirements for Co-Curricular student domestic travel are the same as academic travel; the only difference lies in who may act as Trip Leader and who is asked to serve as Trip Coordinator. Staff members may act as Trip Leaders for Co-Curricular travel. Co-curricular travel is often coordinated through various Enrollment and Student Services Offices.

Related Policies/Forms


Student Domestic Travel Guidelines

Trip Leader


Expectations of Travel Participants

Prior to Travel Commencing

Proposal

The Trip Leader and Coordinator will work together to develop a travel proposal, inclusive of budget estimations, and submit the completed Student Domestic Travel Funding Request. When possible, requests for overnight stays or travel outside of a 50 mile radius should typically be submitted three months in advance of the travel. For local travel, a funding request should typically be submitted three weeks in advance. As part of the proposal process, the Trip Leader should speak with their supervisors regarding coverage for their on-campus responsibilities should the trip be approved.

Planning

Upon approval of the travel proposal, the Trip Leader and Trip Coordinator will communicate fundraising/personal contribution expectations to student participants and the Trip Leader will develop a loose itinerary. If the travel is not specific to a certain class, the Trip Leader and Trip Coordinator will work together to promote the travel opportunity to students.

The Trip Coordinator will maintain a list of students who will participate in the travel, limiting capacity in accordance with budget and number of chaperones. A waitlist will also be maintained in case any of the initial participants are unable to attend.

If the travel will take place within a single day, the Trip Leader will provide students direction for the trip via email and/or the College’s learning management system the day prior to travel. This communication will include:

  • Firmed travel itinerary
  • Other chaperones (if applicable)
  • Transportation details
  • How meals will be handled (if applicable)
  • Expected student expenses – meal, coat check, etc.
  • Behavioral expectations for the trip, i.e. Student Code of Conduct
  • Appropriate attire
  • Necessary gear/materials/tools
  • Risks associated with the trip
  • Need to keep on person at all times – health insurance information and emergency contact
  • Direction should an emergency arise

For travel involving an overnight stay, the Trip Leader, in coordination with the Trip Coordinator, will schedule an orientation for all travel participants. This orientation will take place at least one week prior to the commencement of travel. The orientation will provide the information listed for single day trips, as well as details on the following content.

  • Route
  • Rest and meal stops
  • Lodging
  • Proper identification/health information

Required Forms/Lists

The Trip Leader must have students sign the Field Trip form for all student travel. Completed forms, as well as a Participant List containing student name, student number, cell phone number, and emergency contact information must be submitted by the Trip Coordinator to the Trip Leader, Dean of Students (if overnight travel), and Responsible Administrator at least ten days prior to travel commencing.

While Traveling

Supervision/Direction

While traveling, the Trip Leader is responsible for maintaining an accurate accounting of all participating students. The itinerary communicated prior to the trip should be followed as closely as is feasible.

If the Trip Leader is the sole chaperone for the trip, they must be available to trip participants at all times and be lodged in the same place (as applicable), though they may not share a room with students. If there is an additional chaperone(s) on the trip, oversight breaks may be scheduled with coverage by the chaperone(s).

Alcohol and/or cannabis consumption by Trip Leaders is prohibited while chaperoning student trips, unless there is a chaperone who can respond to an emergency in their stead. If a Trip Leader imbibes, they need to do so in accordance with the dictates offered in the College’s Travel and Entertainment Policy and Alcohol and Other Drug Policy.

The Trip Leader must follow all dictates as set forth by the CCS Chaperone Policy, as well as those in the Travel and Entertainment Policy.

Emergencies

Trip Leaders will carry with them – on their body – the emergency contact information for all participants.

The Trip Leader must report any incident resulting in injury or property loss, criminal activity, violation of trip rules or Student Code of Conduct, emergencies, or any other unusual activity to the Trip Coordinator and Responsible Administrator as soon as practicable following the incident. In the case of a true emergency, the Trip Leader is responsible for calling 911 and/or the local authorities.

Upon Return

Receipt Submittal

Within seven business days of the end of the travel period, the Trip Leader must submit all travel receipts and the remaining funds from any advances received to the Trip Coordinator.

Reporting

A Trip Evaluation Form for Faculty/Staff must be submitted by the Trip Leader to their department Program Manager (as applicable) for use in the Academic Affairs Monthly Report within the same seven-day period. 

A Student Trip Evaluation form link should be sent within three days of the return by the Trip Coordinator. Completed evaluation forms will be made available to the department/office and sponsoring departments by Academic Affairs.

Travel sponsors may require additional reporting from the trip.

Other Chaperones (as applicable)

As stated in the CCS Chaperone Policy, chaperones are typically full-time faculty, staff, or graduate assistants. For academic travel, faculty typically serve in this role. Chaperones are expected to work with the Trip Leader in planning and implementing the travel. Chaperones do not have responsibilities related to reporting or receipt reconciliation.

Trip Coordinator

Prior to Travel Commencing

The Trip Coordinator works with the Trip Leader, aiding in proposal research and trip planning as needed, aiding in the completion and submittal of the Student Domestic Travel Funding Request form, and making reservations for transport, lodging, and access for group participants (i.e. conference fees, museum tickets). The Trip Coordinator also works with the Trip Leader to promote the travel opportunity (as appropriate), conduct an orientation (when needed), and management of the travel budget. The Trip Coordinator is also responsible for liaising with Business Services to set up an account for student deposits.

Prior to travel commencing, the Trip Coordinator is responsible for ensuring that the Trip Leader has submitted Field Trip forms for all participants. The Trip Coordinator will create a Participant List for the Trip Leader and for use internally. The Trip Coordinator will forward this Participant List to the Trip Leader, Dean of Students (if overnight travel), and Responsible Administrator ten days prior to the trip commencing.

While Travel is Taking Place

Trip Coordinators are on on-call status during the duration of the trip, as they will act as liaison between the Trip Leader and the Responsible Administrator should questions or an emergency arise.

Upon Return

Once the travel is complete, Trip Coordinators are responsible for reconciling the travel expenses. Trip Leaders are to submit all receipts from the travel to the Trip Coordinator within seven business days of return. Trip Leaders will also submit a trip evaluation form on the travel. Additional reporting on the trip, in the form of exhibitions, debriefs, etc. may also be expected from trip sponsors; Trip Coordinators will aid in planning for these events as applicable. Trip Coordinators will also communicate with the Trip Leader and all participants regarding the Student Trip Evaluation form.

Responsible Administrator

Prior to Travel Commencing

The Responsible Administrator for student domestic travel is named on the Student Domestic Travel Funding Request form and offers approval for the trip proposal.

While Travel is Taking Place

Responsible Administrators are on on-call status during the duration of the trip, as they may need to respond to questions or offer direction should an emergency arise.

Upon Return

Dependent on the size of the expenditure, Responsible Administrators may be called upon to approve expenditures/reconciliation reports resulting from the travel. Responsible Administrators have the discretion to require additional travel reporting from Trip Leaders, regardless of whether their office sponsored the travel financially.

Student Participants

Prior to Travel Commencing

Students who wish to participate in domestic travel opportunities are expected to carefully consider the trip information provided to them from the Trip Leader and reflect on their own ability to successfully participate in the travel before signing up for the trip. Though students are not required to pay for required class field trips, travel that is not required will typically entail a cost to the student. Students participating in travel may need to miss other classes or commitments – students should ensure that trading one experience for the other is the best choice for them before committing to the trip. Students participating in travel opportunities are expected to attend pre-trip orientations (as applicable), fundraise (as needed), and meet any obligations (surveys, submission of work, etc.) that follow the trip. Finally, while traveling, the Student Code of Conduct and all other policies of the College, as well as any rules set for the by the Trip Leader, are in effect and students wishing to participate in travel must be willing to follow these dictates. Student travelers represent the College and it is imperative that they behave in accordance with the institution’s best interest.

Student travelers should be aware that the College assumes no responsibility in providing participating students funds in the case of an emergency. Participating students should be prepared to assume the costs of their travel, lodging, and food in the case of unanticipated delays or other incidents requiring additional expenditures, as well as any uncovered medical costs.

The Students Affairs office will consider student participant names as they deposit. Students not in good judicial standing may not be permitted to attend overnight trips.

Students participating in domestic travel will also need to submit a Field Trip form prior to traveling.

While Traveling

As stated, all students participating in domestic travel opportunities must adhere to the Student Code of Conduct and all other policies of the College, as well as any rules set by the Trip Leader. Failure to comply may hinder future participation in travel opportunities.

No student is permitted to leave the group, and no student shall be left behind during a trip unless required by circumstances approved by the Responsible Administrator.

Alcohol, cannabis, or illegal substance consumption by students of any age is prohibited during College-sponsored domestic student travel.

Students are expected to approach the Trip Leader or chaperone(s) (if applicable) with any incident resulting in injury or property loss, criminal activity, violation of trip rules or Student Code of Conduct, emergencies, or any other unusual activity that takes place on the trip.

If a student needs to return early from the trip for any reason, the Trip Leader, in consultation with the Trip Coordinator and Responsible Administrator, will determine if that student should be accompanied by a fellow trip participant.

Upon Return

Were any expenses incurred that are approved for repayment, students must submit the relevant receipts to the Trip Coordinator within seven days of return.

If a post-trip event is planned – a presentation on the travel, an exhibition of work inspired by the travel, debrief meeting, etc. – students are expected to participate.

Travel Budget

Funding Sources

Student domestic travel is typically funded via student fundraising and individual student contribution. If the travel is required or offered as part of a sponsored research project, the budget for that project will typically cover the associated costs. Funds are also available through the Academic Affairs office, Student Affairs office, Student Government, and individual program budgets, though the allocation is based on strict criteria developed by each group and usually covers only a portion of the full cost. The criterion for funds available from each office is available on Blackboard.

The Trip Leader and Trip Coordinator are responsible for developing a budget associated with any student travel with four or more student participants. The cost for chaperone travel is included in this estimate. Once the budget is known, the Trip Leader, in coordination with the Trip Coordinator, may submit a Student Domestic Travel Funding Request form to seek funding from College offices. Requests for funding typically require three weeks for full processing. Once the Student Domestic Travel Funding Request form is returned to the Trip Coordinator with allocations detailed, the Trip Leader and Coordinator will work with the student group to guide fundraising efforts in accordance with the Student Fundraising Policy and determine individual student commitments. The cost of attendance for each student, both if fundraising goals are met and if they are not, will be clearly indicated on all promotional materials and communication relating to the travel.

If the travel is cancelled, the Trip Coordinator is responsible for communicating the cancellation to the Trip Leader, Responsible Administrator, participating students, and any offices that allocated funding for the travel within three business days of cancellation.

Student Deposits

Students are expected to deposit half the cost of the trip or $50, whichever is less, to the Business Services office at least five weeks prior to overnight trips as a good faith deposit. Three weeks prior to the trip is a drop-dead date – students wishing to withdraw from the trip after that date will be liable for all expenses incurred. These funds will not be returned if the student chooses not to attend unless an exception is granted by the Responsible Administrator. A wait list will be kept for all student travel with more prospective attendees than available spaces. Waitlisted students are not responsible for submitting deposits until they are confirmed as travelers.

Final student payment for the trip is due to Business Services seven business days prior to the trip. If final payment is not made by this date, students will lose their deposit, as well as their ability to participate, and their space will be given to a waitlisted participant.

Student travel requires clear financial commitment by a known number of participants. If too few students participate, the cost increases for all and the travel may no longer be financially feasible. The Trip Leader and Trip Coordinator will make this determination one week prior to the trip and if the travel is cancelled, coordinate the return of all student deposits.

Reservations/Advance Vendor Payments

Trip Coordinators will typically have a College-provided credit card to use for reservations and vendor payments (conference fees, pre-purchase tickets, etc.). As much as possible, charges should be applied to College credit cards prior to trip commencement rather than paid out of pocket at the time of service by the Trip Leader. All arrangements will be made in accordance with the Travel and Entertainment Policy.

Advances

Cash advances are available for the Trip Leader to pay for costs associated with group meals, ground transport, etc. It is expected that these advances will be requested and reconciled in accordance with the directives offered in the CCS Travel and Entertainment Policy.

Logistics

The College’s Travel and Entertainment Policy offers standard guidelines for faculty and staff travel. The guidance in this section is additional and does not supersede or replace the requirements listed in that Policy.

Transportation

Air Travel

Air travel for student trips presents additional complications and should be used as a mode of transport only when neither vehicle nor train travel would make sense in the given circumstance.

  • All domestic air travelers must have Real-ID compliant Driver’s License or valid passport. Students should be made aware of this requirement as early in the trip planning process as possible so that those without this documentation might have time to apply for and receive these documents prior to the trip.
  • College policy states that airline reservation purchases should be as economical as possible; typically, this means that the tickets will be non-refundable.

If making reservations for a group, representative help can be requested from most airlines. Prior to purchasing airline reservations, the Trip Leader and Coordinator must ensure that all participating students and chaperones (as applicable) are committed to the trip, meet appropriate requirements for travel participants, have completed the Field Trip Form and have, or have the ability to obtain prior to the trip, either a Real-ID Compliant Driver’s License or valid passport.

The College has a corporate rewards program member with Delta Airlines. If purchases are made for this airline, please click that box, choose Delta Air Lines SkyBonus, and use code ESLE7.

The cost of mileage to and from the airport and airport parking for the students, Trip Leader, and Chaperone(s) (as applicable) should be included in the trip budget.

Automobiles

INDIVIDUALLY OWNED

Personal vehicles are used on a voluntary basis and the owners/drivers must have their own insurance coverage and a valid driver’s license. The College does not insure or accept any liability for damage, loss, or injury resulting from the use of a private vehicle. The College does not provide comprehensive or collision (physical damage) insurance for personal vehicles driven on College business. The College does not carry non-owner excess liability insurance to protect the College and employee or student in the event of a suit resulting from an automobile accident in which an employee or student was driving on College business.

If personal vehicles are used for student domestic travel, the costs for mileage and parking (if any), should be included when developing the budget for the trip.  Student, Trip Leader and chaperone(s) (as applicable) mileage and parking should be included in the trip budget, and the cost reimbursed. Itemized receipts and adherence to direction offered in the Travel and Entertainment policy are expected.

CARPOOLING

Students cannot be asked to carpool, but they may choose to do so voluntarily. Please note the liability statements offered in the above section.

Faculty and chaperone(s) should not provide rides to students in their personal vehicles.

RENTED VEHICLES

Rental vehicle use for student domestic travel is rare and must be approved by the Responsible Administrator. The driver of the vehicle will need to be properly licensed and insured for the rented vehicle and receive College permission from Campus Safety/Facilities to chauffer students.

Bus

Charter buses can be an economical choice for travel with large groups. Reservations typically entail agreement via a contract; hence, the Responsible Administrator needs to approve this mode of travel, as does the Vice President of Administration and Finance who approves all contracts with the College. The bus company will need to provide evidence of adequate insurance coverage for personal injury and property damage.

Train

As with airline reservation purchases, train tickets are rarely refundable. Prior to the purchase of tickets, the Trip Leader and Coordinator must ensure that all participating students and chaperones (as applicable) are committed to the trip, meet appropriate requirements for travel participants, have completed the Field Trip Form and have, or have the ability to obtain prior to the trip, valid photo identification.

If traveling by train, the itinerary should make allowances for a variance in arrival schedule.

Local Transport at Location

Local transport (i.e. local buses, subways, taxi services, ride share, bicycle rentals, etc.) once all participants reach the location will be planned in accordance with the budget and itinerary created during the trip preparation phase.

Local transport costs that are included as part of the trip budget will be paid for by the Troop Leader or a designated chaperone (as applicable). Per the Travel and Entertainment policy, receipts must be submitted to the Trip Coordinator upon return for reconciliation/reimbursement purposes.

Participants bear the responsibility of paying for any local transport needs not included in the itinerary. 

Lodging

Trip Leaders and chaperone(s) and student participants are expected to lodge in the same facility, but never the same room. Any exceptions to this will need to be approved by the Responsible Administrator prior to the trip commencing. The cost of lodging for all participants is to be paid from the trip budget, rather than individually. No member of the College may house students in an apartment, home, or other facility owned by any faculty or staff member.

Typically, travel participants on overnight trips will stay in a hostel or moderately priced hotel/motel. Personal charges (videos, room service, etc.) are not allowed. Lodging charges will usually be paid via the College credit card used to reserve the space. The Trip Leader is responsible for canceling unneeded lodging. It is expected that the guidelines offered by the lodging establishment for cancellations be followed.

On occasion, rental properties may be used to house domestic travel participants. This mode of lodging must be approved by the Responsible Administrator, as well as the Vice President of Administration and Finance if a contract is required.

Meals

Meals will be planned in accordance with the budget and itinerary created during the trip preparation phase.

Group meals that are included as part of the cost of the trip will be paid for by the Trip Leader or a designated chaperone (as applicable). Per the Travel and Entertainment policy, the itemized receipt (not summarized credit card receipt) for these meals must be submitted to the Trip Coordinator upon return for reconciliation/reimbursement purposes.

Student participants bear the responsibility of paying for individual meals or snacks not included in the cost of the trip. The individual meals of the Trip Leader and chaperone(s) (as applicable) should be included in the trip budget, though snacks are purchased at personal cost. Itemized receipts and adherence to direction offered in the Travel and Entertainment policy are expected.

Accommodations for Participants with Disabilities

If a student participant with a disability requires accommodation to participate in the trip, the Trip Leader and Coordinator should contact the Dean of Students for assistance in providing reasonable accommodations. If the Trip Leader or a chaperone (as applicable) require accommodation for a disability to participate, the Director of Human Resources should be contacted.

School Closing

In the event it is necessary to close CCS because of severe weather conditions (or any other emergency), it is important that everyone is properly notified. You should also understand that it is CCS policy to keep the College open, if at all possible. Students have every expectation we will do so.

Non-Resident Amenities Fee

Commuting students (those not residing in College Housing) are not able to park overnight in the CCS Structures without obtaining a Non-Resident Amenities Permit. The Non-Resident Amenities Fee allows for commuting students to have access to overnight parking, laundry facilities, and spray booth access in the Art Centre Building. The fee is $200 per year and the form to complete this process is available in the Student Affairs Office.

General Information about CCS Facilities

The college campus totals 15 acres with approximately 850,000 square feet of space. The Kresge-Ford Building houses the Art Practice Department, Craft and Material Studies Department, Photography Department, Art Education Department, and Liberal Arts Department. Faculty offices, the 24 Hour Computer Lab and the Student Success Center are located 2nd floor of the building. The Arts and Crafts Café is located on the 1st floor of the building.

The Yamasaki Building houses Financial Aid, Academic Advising and Registration, Multicultural Affairs, Student Affairs, Ford Campus Bookstore, Business Services, Career Development, International Student Services, Human Resources, and Information Technology Services.

The Art Centre Building provides convenient, spacious student housing. It also houses the Mailroom and fitness room.

The historic ADM Building on Ferry Street houses the Admissions Office and the Executive Offices.

The Walter B. Ford II Building houses the Entertainment Arts Department, Illustration Department, and Foundation Department. In addition, there are several computer labs, classrooms, Audio Visual Center, and the Wendell A. Anderson Jr. Auditorium.

The Manoogian Visual Resource Center houses the Center Galleries, Facilities, Ford Campus Library, and computer labs.

The Fritz Building houses Institutional Advancement.

The A. Alfred Taubman Center for Design Education houses the following departments: Advertising Design, Communication Design, Fashion Accessories Design, Interior Design, Product Design, and Transportation Design as well as Graduate Studies and Academic Affairs. In addition, this facility also houses CCS student housing, 24-hour computer lab, Color & Materials Library, Community Arts Partnership, Design Core, Pre-College and Continuing Education, Imaging Center, Information Technology Services, gallery space, a full-service cafeteria, Tim Horton’s and commuter lounge. This facility is also the location of the Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies.

Academic Policies and Procedures

Complete academic policies related to student expectations, grading guidelines, course registration, class level, and similar policies can be found in the campus Policy database. The College Catalogs can be found on the Course Catalogs page of the college website. Questions regarding academic policies and standards should be directed to the Office of Academic Affairs.

Departmental Review Attendance

The academic programs at CCS are designed to challenge students, prepare them for careers in the visual arts and design, and provide them with opportunities to express their ideas through visual and verbal presentations. At least once each academic year, students are expected to participate in a departmental review. Students who do not attend the review at the scheduled date and time and have circumstances the are beyond their control, should immediately contact the department. Documentation regarding the circumstances may be required from the student. The department will reschedule the review at a time mutually agreeable for the department and student. Students who do not attend their scheduled review and do not make arrangements with the department to reschedule are ineligible to register for the next semester. If a student has registered, he, she, or they will be removed from the registered courses. A departmental hold will be placed on the student’s record until the matter is resolved with the department.

Emergency Notification and Timely Warnings

Emergency Notification

Upon confirmation that a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees is occurring on campus or on nearby city streets, CCS will provide notification to the campus community. Any such notification will be provided by the following methods:

The College for Creative Studies uses an electronic emergency notification system called Everbridge. This system has the capability of sending electronic emergency notices regarding severe weather, school closings and emergency situations to all students, staff, and faculty via their CCS email account and cell phone (if registered with the Alert system). CCS will automatically create accounts for all students, staff, and faculty in the Everbridge system using their campus email address and cell phone number if available in the College’s records. Students, staff, and faculty will be sent an invitation to edit their profile once created to add additional cell phone numbers or change their email address. The College encourages all community members to include a cell phone number in their profile. In the event of an emergency situation on campus, the message will include the location of the emergency and instructions on what action to take.

All students, faculty and staff are urged to provide current personal cell phone so that we can contact you as quickly as possible in the event of an actual emergency. Cell phone numbers are especially important as these devices provide the fastest and most effective way for users to receive information. Your personal cell phone number will only be used for emergency notification purposes. While your profile is automatically created, it is important that you update your profile information to keep the most current forms of contact for the alert system.

CCS’s website—when it is deemed necessary, the College will also utilize the website’s home page to inform and update community members about an emergency occurring on campus. The web alert will contain information about the nature of the emergency and the steps being taken to address the situation.

Timely Warnings Reports (Safety Alerts)

Campus Safety and/or the Dean of Students is responsible for issuing timely warnings in compliance with the Clery Act. These warnings alert students, faculty and staff to crimes that may present an ongoing threat to the campus community. CCS issues timely warnings in a manner that is timely and that withholds as confidential the names and other identifying information of victims and that will aid in the prevention of similar crimes. CCS will issue timely warnings to the campus community on crimes that are:

  1. Crimes required to be report reported to the U.S. Department of Education and disclosed in this annual security report
  2. Reported to Campus Security Authorities
  3. Considered by CCS to represent a threat to students and employees.

Whether or not a situation represents a threat that requires a timely warning will be decided on a case by case basis considering the facts surrounding an incident, such as the nature of the crime, the continuing threat to the campus community and the possible risk of compromising law enforcement efforts.. Timely warnings are issued to students, faculty and staff via a campus-wide email and/or the Everbridge Emergency Notification System.

Information included in a timely warning may include:

  • A succinct statement of the incident.
  • Possible connection to previous incidents, if applicable.
  • Physical description of the suspect.
  • Date and time and general location where the incident occurred.
  • Other relevant crime prevention tips and information

If a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees is occurring on campus, CCS is required to follow its emergency notification procedures. If CCS follows its emergency notification procedures, it is not required also to issue a “timely warning” based on the same circumstances; however, CCS will provide adequate follow-up information to the campus community as needed.

Fire Safety in Housing Facilities

Housing Facility Fire Systems

Both housing facility fire systems are housed in a central system monitored by the College for Creative Studies Campus Safety Office 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The Art Centre Building is fully sprinkled with a fire pump and also includes fire hose risers and pull stations. There are fire extinguishers and horn/strobes in every suite, on each floor. The fire alarm system is inspected in accordance with NFPA 25 and maintained by Simplex Grinnell.

The Taubman Center’s fire system was installed in 2009 and met all Life Safety System, State, and City Codes required when installed. The fire system is fully suppressed and has a sprinkler system. This fire system also includes smoke detectors in each room, annunciators, and strobe lights. Each floor has fire extinguishers and pull stations also found in the hallway. The fire alarm and sprinkler system in inspected in accordance with NFPA 25 and maintained by Simplex Grinnell.

Residents should not hang anything from sprinkler heads or in a manner that would block the coverage of the sprinkler water flow. Nothing should be stored within 18 inches of the ceiling according to NFPA code.

Fire Safety Education

Each year at move-in, residents attend a housing orientation in which students are instructed on the fire evacuation procedures. For the students who have kitchens, they are also told that they have fire extinguishers to use if needed. Those who do not have kitchens are instructed where the extinguishers are located on the floor. They also hear an example of the alarm and are instructed to follow the evacuation procedures, call 911 and let Campus Safety know if there is an actual fire in their suites.

If a resident knows that their suite is responsible for the fire alarm, they are asked to notify the front desk of the cause and if the alarm is an active fire or a false alarm.

Fire Policy Restrictions

The following restrictions have been put in place to ensure proper precautions to reduce fire in the residence halls.

Smoking

Student housing is a Smoke Free Environment. All areas, including all suites, stairwells, hallways, and elevators and 15 feet from doorways are non-smoking. Residents and guest found smoking in student housing will be subject to fines and/or judicial action.

Hookahs & Water Pipes

Hookahs and water pipes are not allowed in student housing. If they are found in your suite, they will be confiscated by Student Life Staff and not returned.

Vaporizers and Electronic Cigarettes

The use of vaporizers and electronic cigarettes is prohibited from all College buildings include the residence halls. Use of these products is restricted in the same manner as tobacco products and must be used outside more than 15 feet from doorways.

Wax

Students are not allowed to melt wax or work with melted wax in student housing.

Incense

Due to the fire hazard incense presents, it is not permitted in student housing. If incense is found in your suite it will be confiscated by Student Life Staff and not returned.

Candles

Due to the fire hazard candles present, candles are not permitted in the student housing. If candles are found in your suite they will be confiscated and disposed of by a member of the Student Life Staff in addition to having to meet with a judicial officer in regards to your offense.

Electronics

Residents are advised to have surge protectors on all electrical equipment that could result in damages from a power surge. It is highly advised that surge protectors be used with stereo equipment, computers, televisions, DVD players, microwaves, etc.

Lamps

Halogen lamps are not permitted in student housing. Residents are to supply their own lamps for their suite. If halogen lamps are found in suites, the lamp will be confiscated and not returned.

Lighting

The placement of any material in or around facility lighting, inclusive of lights in resident rooms will be in violation of the Fire Safety Code.

Machinery

Machinery that is required to run on gasoline (or any other flammable substance) is not permitted in the student housing.

Dangerous Items

Items including, but not limited to fireworks, firearms, explosives, toxic substances, highly flammable substances, knives, and other weapons are prohibited from use or storage in the residence hall. Any item that may be considered a dangerous item, and is needed for academic reasons must be used solely for its intended academic purpose, and have the prior approval of the Residence Life Coordinator to be kept or used in the building.

Motorcycles

Motorcycles, mopeds, or other gasoline-powered vehicles are not to be stored in student housing. These vehicles can be parked in the parking garage.

ACB-specific Policies

Cooking

Students are to keep the cooking area in their suites clean, safe, and healthy.

Radiators

When the weather gets cold you can regulate the heat in your suite by opening and closing your radiators. If your radiator does not have a knob to open and close the valve or if your radiator makes a hissing noise, notify the Housing Office or an RA.

Do not store items on top of or near radiators, especially flammable or pressure contained items. The completed renovations of the ACB will eliminate all radiators from the suites and will be replaced by modern HVAC units.

Taubman-specific Policies

Cooking

Students are not allowed to use any open coiled kitchen appliances in their suites. This includes George Foreman style grills, toasters, toaster ovens, hot plates, pizza ovens or any other open coiled appliance. You may bring a microwave, mini refrigerator, coffee pot, rice cooker, and crock-pot. For further verification that a kitchen appliance is allowed, please contact the Residence Life Coordinator. Items that are not allowed and found in housing will be confiscated and not returned.

Evacuation Procedures

Evacuation upon the sounding of the fire alarm system is required. Failure to evacuate housing when an emergency alarm is sounding is a violation of the resident agreement and federal regulations. Residents are expected to become familiar with the evacuation procedures during their first few hours in residence. If the evacuation instruction information (found on the back of the room door) is illegible or missing, residents should contact the Residence Life Coordinator immediately for a replacement. Residents are expected to attend all housing meetings referencing safety training.

When evacuating you should:

  1. Yell for your suite-mates to ensure that they hear the fire alarm.
  2. Close your door behind you so that if the fire spreads to your floor the door will deter its speed.
  3. Knock on the doors to the other suites on your floor. You should not wait for your suite-mate or floor mates before you evacuate the building.
  4. Do not use the elevator when evacuating. Please use either sets of stairs located on each floor.
  5. Once you have left the ACB, you should proceed to the cafeteria and wait for further instructions from Student Affairs Staff. If you are evacuating from the Taubman Center, please go to the parking lot between Cass and Woodward for further instructions. Resident Assistants and/or Campus Safety personnel will determine when it is safe to re-enter the building.

Carelessness Related to Fire Alarms

Residents who are responsible for repeatedly showing carelessness and causing the fire alarm to sound will be charged a fine. A charge of $50 may result the second time an alarm is set off due to carelessness and/or negligence, and the third time the resident may be asked to vacate student housing.

Smoking

State and local laws prohibit smoking in all parts of College buildings. City ordinance prohibits smoking within 15 feet of any building entrance.

In the interest of providing a safe and healthy environment for all staff, faculty, students and visitors, and in accordance with the Michigan Clean Indoor Act and the City of Detroit Smoking Pollution Control Ordinance, smoking is prohibited in all CCS buildings and within 15 feet of all building entrances and air intakes.

Enforcement of Policy

The success of this policy depends upon the thoughtfulness, consideration and cooperation of smokers and non-smokers. Students are encouraged to ask offending smokers to stop smoking. Any student smoking in a non-smoking area must immediately stop upon being requested to do so. Failure to do so will result in formal disciplinary action as outlined below.

Complaints

Complaints regarding the smoking of faculty and staff should be made to the Department Chair, the employee’s immediate supervisor or the Director of Human Resources. Complaints regarding students smoking should be made to the Director of Student Life.

Disciplinary Action

All student complaints should be made in writing to the Dean of Students. The Dean of Students will notify the student in writing that a complaint has been issued. A second offense will result in a $50 fine. A third offense will result in a $100 fine. Further violations will be subject to CCS disciplinary policies, up to and including expulsion.

Students wishing to contest the above may do so in writing to the Office of Student Affairs. Evidence of non-violation should be attached.

Alcohol and Other Drug Policy for Students, Faculty and Staff

(updated February 2020)

The College for Creative Studies is committed to providing a safe, healthy learning community for all its members. The College recognizes that the improper and excessive use of alcohol and other drugs may interfere with the College’s mission by negatively affecting the health and safety of students, faculty, and staff. Due to the harm caused by the excessive and illegal use of alcohol and other drugs, the College has a vested interest in establishing policies to prohibit unlawful behavior and sanctions to address policy violations by members of the CCS community.

Under the Drug-Free Workplace Act and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act, the College is required to have an alcohol and other drug policy and must distribute this policy annually to all employees and students. This Policy must outline the College’s prevention, education and intervention efforts, and consequences that may be applied by both the College and external authorities for policy violations. The law also requires that individuals be notified of possible health risks associated with the use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs, and sources of assistance for problems that may arise as a result of use.

Scope

This policy applies to all faculty and staff, as well as students enrolled in credit bearing and non-credit bearing courses at CCS, including any and all programs located off site. Guests, on campus or at College events, who are violating a College policy, may be asked to leave campus/the event and their CCS host will be held responsible for their guest’s actions.

Students visiting other countries to attend academic programs are reminded that they may be subject to arrest and legal sanctions for alcohol and drug offenses under the laws and regulations of that particular country or institution in addition to the judicial process of the College.

Definitions

The following terms are defined for the purposes of this policy and are important for purposes of expressing the College’s policy on a drug and alcohol-free environment:
College refers to the College for Creative Studies.

College activities include programs affiliated with the College, including study-abroad programs, and any on-campus or off-campus event or function conducted, approved, sponsored or funded, in whole or in part, by the College or any officially recognized student organization.

College premises includes all buildings and land owned, leased, or used by the College (including adjacent streets and sidewalks), and motor vehicles operated by employees, including personal motor vehicles, when used in connection with work performed for or on behalf of the College.

Controlled Substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of section 202 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), as further defined by regulations at 21 CFR 1300.11 through 1300.15.

Contract means a legal instrument reflecting a relationship between the federal government and a recipient whenever the principal purpose of the instrument is the acquisition by purchase, lease, or barter, of property or services for the direct benefit or use of the federal government; or whenever an executive agency determines in a specific instance that the use of a type of procurement contract is appropriate.

Conviction means finding of guilt (including a plea of nolo contendere) or imposition of sentence, or both, by any judicial body charged with the responsibility to determine violations of the federal or state criminal drug statutes.

Criminal drug statute means a federal or non-federal criminal statute involving the manufacture, sale, distribution, dispensation, use, or possession of any controlled substance.

Drug For the purpose of this Policy, the term “drug” includes:

  • controlled substances, as defined in 21 USC 812, which cannot be legally obtained
  • legally obtainable controlled substances which were not legally obtained, including:
  • Prescribed drugs when prescription is no longer valid (e.g. use of medication after a course of treatment is completed);
  • Prescribed drugs used contrary to the prescription;
  • Prescribed drugs issued to another person.

Federal agency or agency means any United States executive department, military department, government corporation, government controlled corporation, or any other establishment in the executive branch, or any independent regulatory agency.

Guest means a person who is not a direct member of the College community, such as a student or employee.

Host means the person who is responsible for a guest being on campus or at a College event.

Illicit drug use means the use, manufacture, sale, distribution, dispensation, or possession of illegal drugs.

Over the Counter Substances means items that are available for purchase from retailers that do not need a prescription.

Prescribed Drug means any substance prescribed for use by a licensed medical practitioner.

Student means an individual registered or enrolled for a credit or non-credit course or program offered by the College.

CCS Alcohol and Drugs Policy

All members of the CCS community also are governed by laws, regulations, and ordinances established by the state and local municipalities and will be held accountable by law enforcement representatives of those entities for any illegal activity. It is the responsibility of all campus members to be aware of these laws.

Alcohol

Employees, students, and campus guests, regardless of age, are expected to refrain from the possession, consumption or transportation of alcoholic beverages while on any part of the campus or at College-sponsored/supported events, while driving a College vehicle or while otherwise engaged in College business. Possession of an empty container of an alcoholic beverage will be dealt with as though the individual responsible for the empty container consumed the contents.

The only exception to this Policy is that individuals of legal age may consume alcohol on College property in a manner consistent with College policy and State of Michigan law within the approved designated area of events coordinated by the President of the College.  To request an exception to this Policy for events not coordinated by the President, approval must be obtained from the employee’s Vice President or Dean with final approval given by the President of the College using the Request for Approval to Serve Alcohol at a CCS Sponsored Event form (see link at the end of this paragraph).  For all College related events involving alcohol, a licensed, third-party bartender must be present to serve the alcohol and the bartender must refrain from using a tip jar.  

Drug/Controlled Substance

Students, CCS employees, and guests are prohibited from using, possessing, transferring or selling any illegal drug, controlled substance, or related paraphernalia, including hookahs, while on any part of the campus or at College-sponsored/supported events.

Any person taking prescription drugs or over-the-counter medication is personally responsible for ensuring that while taking such drugs or medications, he or she is not a safety risk to themselves and others while on College property while driving a College or privately owned vehicle, or while otherwise engaged in College business. It is illegal to misuse prescription medication, i.e. continue to use medication when the prescription is no longer valid, use prescribed drugs contrary to the prescription, and give or sell prescribed drugs to another person. Misusing prescription drugs can result in a conviction with jail time.

CCS Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Strategies

The College uses the following strategies to provide a positive influence on the campus culture regarding alcohol and drug abuse.

  • Students, employees, and campus guests, regardless of age, are expected to refrain from the possession, consumption or transportation of alcoholic beverages on campus. (see details and exceptions described in the above section)
  • Providing education and awareness activities
  • All student social, extracurricular, and public service options are substance-free
  • Prohibiting the marketing and promotion of alcohol and other drugs
  • Developing and enforcing campus policies and enforce laws to address high-risk and illegal alcohol and other drug use
  • Providing early intervention and referral for treatment

Health Risks

The use or abuse of alcohol and other drugs increases the risk for a number of health-related and other medical, behavioral and social problems. Below is a general description of the health risks associated with drug use.

ALCOHOL Can cause short-term effects such as loss of concentration and judgment; slowed reflexes; disorientation leading to higher risk of accidents and problem behavior; long-term effects include a risk of liver and heart damage, malnutrition, cancer and other illnesses; can be highly addictive to some persons.

AMPHETAMINES Can cause short-term effects such as rushed, careless behavior and pushing beyond your physical capacity, leading to exhaustion; tolerance increases rapidly; long-term effects include physical and psychological dependence and withdrawal can result in depression and suicide; continued high doses can cause heart problems, infections, malnutrition, and death.

CANNABIS Can cause short-term effects such as slow reflexes; increase in forgetfulness; alters the judgment of space and distance; aggravate pre-existing heart and/or mental health problems; long-term health effects include permanent damage to lungs, reproductive organs and brain function; can interfere with physical, psychological, social development of young users.

COCAINE (crack) Can cause short-term effects such as impaired judgment; increased breathing, heart rate, heart palpitations; anxiety, restlessness, hostility, paranoia, confusion; long-term effects may include damage to respiratory and immune systems; malnutrition, seizures, and loss of brain function; highly addictive.

DESIGNER DRUGS/SYNTHETIC CANNABINOIDS (bath salts, K2, spice) Can cause short-term effects such as elevated heart rate, blood pressure and chest pain; hallucinations, seizures, violent behavior and paranoia; may lead to lack of appetite, vomiting and tremor; long-term use may result in kidney/liver failure, increased risk of suicide and death.

HALLUCINOGENS (PCP, LSD, ecstasy, dextromethorphan) Can cause extreme distortions of what is seen and heard; induces sudden changes in behavior, loss of concentration and memory; increases risk of birth defects in user’s children; overdose can cause psychosis, convulsions, coma, and death. Frequent and long-term use can cause permanent loss of mental function.

INHALANTS (nitrous oxide, amyl nitrite, butyl nitrite, chlorohydrocarbons, hydrocarbons) Can cause short-term effects such as nausea, dizziness, fatigue, slurred speech, hallucinations or delusions; may lead to rapid and irregular heart rhythms, heart failure and death; long-term use may result in loss of feeling, hearing, and vision; can result in permanent damage to the brain, heart, lungs, liver and kidneys.

OPIATES/NARCOTICS (heroin, morphine, opium, codeine, oxycodone, china white) Can cause physical and psychological dependence; overdose can cause coma, convulsions, respiratory arrest, and death; long-term use leads to malnutrition, infection, and hepatitis; sharing needles is a leading cause of the spread of HIV and hepatitis; highly addictive, tolerance increases rapidly.

SEDATIVES Can cause reduced reaction time and confusion; overdose can cause coma, respiratory arrest, convulsions, and death; withdrawal can be dangerous; in combination with other controlled substances can quickly cause coma and death; long-term use can produce physical and psychological dependence; tolerance can increase rapidly.

TOBACCO (cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco) Can cause diseases of the cardiovascular system, in particular smoking being a major risk factor for a myocardial infarction (heart attack), diseases of the respiratory tract such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and emphysema, and cancer, particularly lung cancer and cancers of the larynx and mouth; nicotine is highly addictive.

For an extensive list of health-related risks please visit The National Institute on Drug Abuse: http://www.drugabuse.gov/

Counseling and Treatment Programs

Students

All students are encouraged to seek help early if they feel they have a problem with drugs and/or alcohol and to learn how to assist others with substance abuse problems. With early assistance, it is less likely that serious consequences will result from an alcohol or drug problem.

The College offers the following alcohol and drug abuse services:

Information and Referral
All students are eligible to consult with the professional staff of the Wellness Center; personal counselors and/or health care professional, regarding the availability of drug abuse assistance programs. Drug and alcohol abuse counseling and rehabilitation program referrals are made to mutual help organizations, private hospitals, public treatment programs, and private drug treatment practitioners.

Individual Counseling
Individuals are seen on a short-term basis for assistance with drug-related problems. However, it is likely that students will be referred out for alcohol and drug dependence. This service is available to students at no charge.

Contact Information
Personal Counseling – 313-664-7852 or 313-664-7838
College Nurse – 313-664-7982

Employees

Alcohol and drug abuse rehabilitation and assistance programs are available through the College’s health benefits program and Ulliance (employee assistance program) with both in-patient and out-patient programs. Employees with alcohol or drug abuse problems are strongly encouraged to participate in these programs. Employees may contact the Office of Human Resources to seek counseling assistance and/or referral to an appropriate outside agency. All communications between employees and CCS or outside agencies are strictly confidential.

Contact Information
Human Resources – 313-664-7652
Ulliance (Employee Assistance Program) – 888-333-6269
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan – 800-637-2227
Blue Care Network – 800-662-6667

Community Resources

Narcotics Anonymous – www.na.org

Alcoholics Anonymous – www.aa.org

Al-anon – www.al-anon.alateen.org
For friends, relatives and domestic partners who are coping with a loved one’s alcohol or drug use.

Drug Free Detroit – www.drugfreedetroit.org

CCS Sanctions

The use or abuse of alcohol and other drugs also increases the risks for behavioral and social problems such as negative effects on academic work performance; conflicts with co-workers, classmates, family, friends and others; conduct problems resulting in disciplinary action, including loss of employment or dismissal from an academic program; and legal problems resulting in ticketing, fines and imprisonment.

Students

When a student is found responsible for violating the CCS Alcohol and Other Drug Policy, their case will be evaluated and an appropriate sanction will be implemented.

The sanctions described are minimum sanctions and do not limit the disciplinary power of the College in any matter involving Code of Conduct violations.

A Warning is a written notification that a particular action is not acceptable.

Disciplinary Probation is a formal written notice that a student is in poor judicial standing with the College.

Loss of College Housing Eligibility (if applicable) is the termination of a student’s admissibility to live in College housing.

Suspension is the termination of an individual’s status as a student, with the loss of all rights and privileges, for a specific time period.

Dismissal is the permanent termination of an individual’s status as a student, with the loss of all rights and privileges.

Community Service Hours is a required number of hours to be worked in unpaid College or public service within a specific period of time.

Educational Project is a project that is focused on educating the student about a particular issue.

Employees

CCS will take appropriate action, up to and including immediate termination, with employees in violation of this policy. Employees are notified that action under this policy may include requiring successful participation in an alcohol or drug rehabilitation or assistance program as a condition of continued employment.

External Sanctions

Federal Law

Violations of laws and ordinances may result in misdemeanor or felony convictions accompanied by the imposition of legal sanctions, which include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Fines as determined under local, state, or federal laws;
  • Imprisonment, including up to life imprisonment, for possession or trafficking of drugs such as heroin, cocaine, marijuana and prescription drugs;
  • Forfeiture of personal and real property;
  • Denial of federal benefits such as grants, contracts and student loans;
  • Loss of driving privileges;
  • Required attendance at substance abuse education or treatment programs.

A full description of federal sanctions for drug felonies can be found at https://www.dea.gov/drug-policy-information. This section is not intended as legal advice; consult with an attorney regarding your specific legal issues.

Michigan Law

Alcohol: Under Michigan law, it is illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to purchase, consume or possess, or have any bodily content of alcohol. A first-time conviction may result in a fine, substance abuse education and treatment, community service and court-ordered drug screenings. There also is a provision for possible imprisonment or probation for a second or subsequent offense. Use of false identification by minors in obtaining alcohol is punishable with a fine, loss of driver’s license, probation and community service.

Individuals can be arrested and/or convicted of operating a vehicle while intoxicated with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level of .08 or higher. If a student is under 21, there is a “zero tolerance” law in the state of Michigan, and any blood alcohol level of .01 or higher can lead to a minor in possession (MIP) citation as well as being cited for operating a vehicle while intoxicated, if applicable. This is in addition to the suspension of driving privileges in the State of Michigan.

Medical Amnesty: To better ensure that minors at medical risk as a result of alcohol intoxication will receive prompt and appropriate medical attention, the State of Michigan provides for medical amnesty to remove perceived barriers to calling for or seeking help.

Michigan law continues to prohibit a minor from purchasing, consuming, or possessing, or attempting to purchase, consume, or possess, alcoholic liquor and from having any bodily alcohol content. The medical amnesty law provides an exemption from prosecution for the following:

  • A minor (under the age of 21) who, after consuming alcohol, voluntarily presents himself or herself to a health facility or agency for treatment or observation, including medical examination and treatment for any condition as a result of sexual assault (as defined in Michigan law).
  • Any minor (under the age of 21) who accompanied a minor (under the age of 21) who, after consuming alcohol, voluntarily presented himself or herself to a health facility or agency for treatment or observation, including medical examination and treatment for any condition as a result of sexual assault (as defined in Michigan law).
  • Any minor (under the age of 21) who initiated contact with law enforcement or emergency medical services personnel for the purpose of obtaining medical assistance in connection with a legitimate health care concern.

Michigan Laws Governing Marijuana: Michigan marijuana laws conflict with federal criminal laws governing controlled substances, as well as federal laws requiring institutions receiving federal funds, by grant or contract, to maintain drug-free campuses and workplaces. CCS receives federal funding that would be in jeopardy if those federal laws did not take precedence over state law. Thus the use, possession or cultivation of marijuana in any form and for any purpose continues to violate the CCS Alcohol and Drug Policy and is prohibited.

State of Michigan Legal Sanctions for Illegal Use, Possession and/or Delivery of Controlled Substances

(Act No. 368 of the Public Acts of 1978)

State of Michigan Sanctions for Violation of Drug Laws Narcotic Drug and Cocaine:

Delivery and Possession – Felony, Mandatory 10 years to life.

Use less than 50 grams – Misdemeanor, up to 1 year and/or $2,000 fine.

Hallucinogens:

Delivery – Felony, up to 7 years and/or $5,000 fine.

Possession – Misdemeanor, up to 1 year and/or $1,000 fine.

Use – Misdemeanor, up to 6 months and/or $100 fine.

Marijuana:

Delivery – Felony, up to 4 years and/or $2,000 fine.

Possession – Misdemeanor, up to 1 year and/or $1,000 fine.

Use – Misdemeanor, up to 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Other Controlled Substances:

Delivery – Felony, up to 7 years and/or $1,000 – $5,000 fine.

Possession – Misdemeanor or felony, up to 2 years and/or $1,000 – $2,000 fine.

Use – Misdemeanor, up to 1 year and/or $100 – $1,000 fine.

State of Michigan Sanctions for Violation of Alcohol Laws Sale to Minors:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Minor Possessing or Transporting in Motor Vehicle:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Furnishing Fraudulent ID to Minor/Use of Fraudulent ID by Minor:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Consumption on/in Public Highways, Parks or Places of Amusement:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Open Alcohol in Vehicles on Highways:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

Purchase, Possession or Consumption by Minor:

(Civil Citation) : First violation not more than $25.00; Second violation not more than $50.00 (or participate in a substance abuse program) ; Third and subsequent violation not more than $100.00 (or participate in a substance abuse program) .

Selling Without a License:

Misdemeanor, 1 year and/or $1,000 fine.

Selling or Furnishing Alcohol to a Minor:

Misdemeanor, 90 days and/or $100 fine.

State of Michigan Sanctions for Drinking/Driving Offenses Operating a Motor Vehicle with Ability Impaired: (depends on number of offenses)

Operating a Motor Vehicle Under the Influence of Intoxicating Liquor:

Operating a motor vehicle with unlawful blood alcohol level of 0.10 grams or more per 100 milliliters of blood: Up to $1,000 fine, up to 1 year in jail, 10 to 90 days community service, license suspended for 90 days to 2 years or 5 years of a revoked license. If death caused, the offense becomes a felony.

Employee Reporting Requirement

Under the Drug-Free Workplace Act, in addition to the other requirements of this Policy, the College requires all employees who work in any capacity under a federal grant or contract to notify his or her supervisor or department head in writing of his or her conviction for a violation of any criminal drug statute occurring in the workplace or on work-related activities no later than five (5) calendar days after such conviction. The supervisor or department head will notify the Office of Human Resources.

Distribution of Policy

A copy of this Policy statement will be distributed to all faculty, staff and students annually via email at the beginning of fall semester.

Review of the College’s Prevention Program and Policy

Annually, the College shall review its Alcohol and Other Drug Policy and prevention strategies to determine effectiveness and to ensure that the College’s disciplinary sanctions are consistently enforced. This annual review will be conducted in May and the minutes from the review are available to students and employees upon request.

For More Information

For more information concerning this Policy, employees should contact the Office of Human Resources at 313-664-7652 and students should contact the Office of Student Affairs at 313-664-7879.