Cafeteria

A. Alfred Taubman Center
Second Floor
Hours: To be posted each semester

The cafeteria is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner service. It features a variety of freshly prepared entrees and side dishes. The menu changes daily. The A. Alfred Taubman Center will also house a quick-service grill on the ground floor.

ATMs

Kresge Ford 1st floor B side and Taubman Center 1st floor near the Bookstore.

Withdrawals in $20 increments may be made for a service fee of $1.50 (participating banks may also charge a fee). Most nationwide bankcards are accepted.

General Information about CCS Facilities

The college campus totals 15 acres with approximately 850,000 square feet of space. The Kresge-Ford Building houses the Art Practice Department, Craft and Material Studies Department, Photography Department, Art Education Department, and Liberal Arts Department. Faculty offices, the 24 Hour Computer Lab and the Student Success Center are located 2nd floor of the building. The Arts and Crafts Café is located on the 1st floor of the building.

The Yamasaki Building houses Financial Aid, Academic Advising and Registration, Multicultural Affairs, Student Affairs, Ford Campus Bookstore, Business Services, Career Development, International Student Services, Human Resources, and Information Technology Services.

The Art Centre Building provides convenient, spacious student housing. It also houses the Mailroom and fitness room.

The historic ADM Building on Ferry Street houses the Admissions Office and the Executive Offices.

The Walter B. Ford II Building houses the Entertainment Arts Department, Illustration Department, and Foundation Department. In addition, there are several computer labs, classrooms, Audio Visual Center, and the Wendell A. Anderson Jr. Auditorium.

The Manoogian Visual Resource Center houses the Center Galleries, Facilities, Ford Campus Library, and computer labs.

The Fritz Building houses Institutional Advancement.

The A. Alfred Taubman Center for Design Education houses the following departments: Advertising Design, Communication Design, Fashion Accessories Design, Interior Design, Product Design, and Transportation Design as well as Graduate Studies and Academic Affairs. In addition, this facility also houses CCS student housing, 24-hour computer lab, Color & Materials Library, Community Arts Partnership, Design Core, Pre-College and Continuing Education, Imaging Center, Information Technology Services, gallery space, a full-service cafeteria, Tim Horton’s and commuter lounge. This facility is also the location of the Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies.

Academic Policies and Procedures

Complete academic policies related to student expectations, grading guidelines, course registration, class level, and similar policies can be found in the campus Policy database. The College Catalogs can be found on the Course Catalogs page of the college website. Questions regarding academic policies and standards should be directed to the Office of Academic Affairs.

Location

CCS is located in Detroit’s Midtown and New Center neighborhoods. Populated with students, artists, musicians, and educators, the areas have a cosmopolitan and slightly bohemian feel. Perhaps no place in the metropolitan area has such a diverse gathering of cultures and backgrounds.

The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), one of the world’s most renowned fine arts museums, is in our neighborhood. The DIA is a constant source of reference, instruction, and inspiration for students and teachers alike. Also within close walking distance of the CCS campus are the Detroit Historical Museum, Detroit Public Library, Museum of African American History, Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, Detroit Science Center, Scarab Club, the International Institute, Fisher Theater, Cadillac Place and the Amtrak Station.

Wellness Center Informed Consent

Eligibility and Service Limits

The Wellness Center provides solution-focused counseling services for CCS students (“clients”) who are currently attending full-time or part-time. The services you receive at the Wellness Center are based on a determination of your needs and goals.

Our Counselors/ Fees

The personal counselors at the Wellness Center are Licensed Mental Health Providers, licensed by the State of Michigan. They have at least a master’s degree in counseling, social work, or psychology. The counselors will provide you additional information regarding their training and counseling methods and philosophies at the start of the counseling relationship. There are no fees charged to registered CCS students for counseling services.

Referrals

The personal counselors generally provide solution-focused counseling services. Our counseling is a way to assist clients through personal difficulties that may affect or hinder their academic performance at CCS. Services provided by the personal counselors are not intended to include crisis or long-term counseling needs, or diagnose or treat serious and/or persistent mental illness or mental disorders. Should your needs or presenting issues require services that the Wellness Center does not provide, you will be referred to another agency or treatment provider that can meet your needs. CCS personal counselors will assist the client in finding an appropriate professional or organization that may specialize in the issues presented by the client. These professionals are not paid by or employed by CCS. A referral does not represent an endorsement or formal relationship between the referral source and CCS.

All referrals are at the discretion of CCS and are voluntary on the part of the client.

Confidentiality

The personal counselors adhere to Federal and State laws and professional ethical standards. Counseling records are confidential, maintained and stored in secured cabinets with access restricted to personal counseling staff, and may only be released when mandated by a court or authorized by your signature (or that of your legal representative), with some exceptions. We are legally required to disclose information in some situations to protect people from harm, even though that requires revealing some information about a client’s treatment. The following situations are exceptions to confidentiality:

  • If we believe that a client is threatening serious harm to another person, we are required to take protective actions, which may include but is not limited to, appropriate CCS personnel, notifying the potential victim, notifying the police, or seeking appropriate intervention.
  • If a client threatens to hurt him/herself, we may be required to contact others who can help provide protection from harm.
  • If we learn from first-hand knowledge that a child or incapacitated adult is being abused, we may be required to file a report with an appropriate agency.
  • If your records are requested by a proper subpoena or court order, we may be required to turn your records over to the court.
  • In addition, confidential counseling information may be disclosed where necessary for administrative supervision, clinical supervision, consultation, or other internal administrative functions – such as the Student Concerns Committee. Counselors reserve the right to verify attendance in counseling when there is a referral initiated by an administrator, faculty or staff.

A copy of the Office of Student Affairs’ Notice of Privacy Practices is attached. Please review it carefully.

Risks and Benefits of Counseling

There is a possibility of benefits and risks when participating in counseling. The risks may involve the remembering of unpleasant events and may arouse strong emotional feelings. Counseling may also impact relationships with significant others. The benefits of counseling may be an improved ability to relate with others; a clearer understanding of self, values, goals; increased academic productivity; and ability to deal with everyday stress. You and your personal counselor will work together to determine the pace and form of treatment so as to minimize the risks while maximizing the benefits of counseling.

Location, Hours, and Emergencies

The personal counselors are available in the Wellness Center, second floor Yamasaki Building Monday – Friday from 8:30am – 4:30pm. The mailing address for the wellness center is: 201 E. Kirby, Detroit, MI 48202.

For after-hour emergencies you may contact the Wayne State University Psychology Clinic’s 24-hour crisis line at 313-224-7000, National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255, or go to the nearest hospital emergency room.

E-mail

With respect to electronic mail (e-mail), be cautioned that e-mail is not a confidential means of communication. Furthermore, the Office of Student Affairs cannot ensure that e-mail messages will be received or responded to if the personal counselor is not available. E-mail is not the appropriate way to communicate confidential, urgent or emergency information

Appointments

Student Affairs professional staff, for the purposes of scheduling and managing appointment times, do have access to the personal counselors electronic calendars. Only the student’s name, phone number and date/time are included in this information. All Student Affairs professional staff adheres to protecting each student’s confidentiality per their signed confidentiality agreement form.

If you are unable to keep a counseling appointment, please call 313-664-7879 to cancel 24 hours in advance or as soon as possible. If your personal counselor cannot keep an appointment with you, you will be contacted by the Office of Affairs or another personal counselor from the wellness center to reschedule your appointment. If you do not show for a scheduled appointment and do not contact your personal counselor for a follow-up appointment within 30 days, your file will be closed. You can reopen your file at any time by contacting one of the personal counselors or the Office of Student Affairs to schedule an appointment. If you are chronically late or do not attend your scheduled appointments your eligibility for personal counseling services may be revoked.

Contacting You

In the event that the staff at the Office of Student Affairs needs to contact you, please provide a phone number and email address where you wish to be reached, and whether you authorize the Office of Affairs to leave messages.

Informed Consent

Drug Convictions & Financial Aid Eligbility

Loss of Eligibility

According to federal regulations, students convicted of a drug offense that occurred during a period of enrollment while they were receiving Title IV Federal Financial Aid may lose eligibility for Federal Aid.

Federal Aid includes:

  • Federal Pell and SEOG Grants
  • Federal Work Study
  • Federal Direct Subsidized/Unsubsidized Loan
  • Federal Direct PLUS Loan

If a student answers ‘Yes’ to question 31 on the FAFSA, they will be sent a worksheet by the federal processing center in order to determine if the conviction affects eligibility for aid. Should the Financial Aid Office be notified that a student has been convicted of sale or possession of illegal drugs, the financial assistance will be suspended immediately.

If a conviction was reversed, set aside, or removed from the student’s record it does not count. Convictions occurring during periods of non-enrollment do not count. In addition, any conviction received as a juvenile does not count, unless the student was tried as an adult.

The period of ineligibility is dependent upon the type of conviction (sale or possession) and if there were previous offenses.

Possession of Illegal Drugs

1st Offense – 1 year from date of conviction
2nd Offense – 2 years from date of conviction
3rd Offense – Indefinite period

Sale of Illegal Drugs

1st Offense – 2 years from date of conviction
2nd Offense – Indefinite period

If the student was convicted of both selling and possessing drugs they will be ineligible for the longer period.

Regaining Eligibility

The student may regain eligibility:

  • The day after the period of ineligibility ends,
  • When they successfully complete a qualified drug rehabilitation program or,
  • If the student passes two unannounced drug tests given by a qualified rehabilitation program

Additional drug convictions will make the student ineligible for federal aid again.

It is the student’s responsibility to certify to the school that they have successfully completed the rehabilitation program.

Students denied eligibility for an indefinite period can regain it after:

  • Successfully completing a rehabilitation program as described below,
  • Passing two unannounced drug tests from such a program, or
  • If a conviction is reversed, set aside, or removed from the student’s record so that fewer than two convictions for sale or three convictions for possession remain on the record. In such cases, the nature and dates of the remaining convictions determine when the student regains eligibility.

Qualified Drug Rehabilitation Program

A qualified drug rehabilitation program must include at least two unannounced drug tests and must satisfy at least one of the following requirements:

  • Be qualified to receive funds directly from a federal, state, or local government.
  • Be qualified to receive payment directly or indirectly from a federal or state-licensed insurance company.
  • Be administered or recognized by a federal, state, or local government agency or court.
  • Be administered or recognized by a federally or state-licensed hospital, health clinic, or medical doctor.

Student Health Insurance

All registered non-matriculating and degree-seeking students are automatically enrolled in the College’s accident insurance as part of the registration process. This insurance plan is active from the beginning of the semester in which the student is registered. Students who enroll in the fall semester pay a rate that covers them for the fall, winter and summer semesters. Students enrolling in the winter semester pay a discounted rate and are covered for the winter and summer semesters. Students who enroll in the summer semester pay a discounted rate and are covered for the summer semester. This insurance provides 24-hour-a-day coverage for accidents that occur on and off campus. The College assumes no responsibility for student medical or hospital expenses. The policy is required for enrollment at CCS, whether or not a student has other coverage.

All students are urged to carry medical hospitalization insurance. The College offers voluntary sickness and major medical insurance to students, their spouses and dependents at their cost. International students are automatically enrolled in this policy.

Code of Student Conduct

The Code of Student Conduct is in place to ensure students are aware of the behavior expected of them as members of the CCS community. The purpose of this Code is to create an environment that fosters civility, personal responsibility, and mutual respect of others and their differences.

Any student who commits a violation of the Code of Student Conduct is subject to disciplinary sanction, up to and including dismissal from CCS. The following actions/behaviors shall constitute violations of the Code of Student Conduct:

  1. Violating published CCS policies, rules, or regulations including, but not limited to, the policies on nondiscrimination, sexual harassment, smoking, drugs/controlled substance and alcohol.
  2. Violating federal, state or local laws on CCS premises or while in attendance at CCS sponsored, approved, or supervised events/programs or committing off-campus violations of federal, state or local law that adversely affect CCS, the pursuit of its objectives and/or a CCS community member (defined as, but not limited to: administrators, faculty, staff, students, guests, visitors, vendors or contractors).
  3. Committing acts of sexual assault (stranger, date, or acquaintance rape), or other forms of coerced sexual activity.
  4. Engaging in acts of physical abuse and/or actions that intimidate, harass, threaten, coerce, or otherwise endanger the health and safety of one’s self or another.
  5. Engaging in disorderly conduct or fighting, which is defined to include, but is not limited to, behaviors which are viewed as intoxicated, lewd, indecent, obscene, slanderous or threatening to others.
  6. Interrupting or disturbing the day-to-day academic and operational functions of CCS or committing intentional acts that obstruct, disrupt, or physically interfere with the use of CCS premises, buildings, or passages.
  7. Possessing, duplicating, or using keys/IDs to any CCS building or facility without authorization by appropriate CCS officials or committing an act of unauthorized entry into or use of CCS buildings or facilities by use of key, ID card or force.
  8. Engaging or participating in acts of unauthorized possession, use, removal, defacing, tampering, damage, or destruction of CCS owned or leased property, equipment, computer programs, or materials, or that of any CCS community member.
  9. Posting, affixing, or otherwise attaching unauthorized written or printed messages or materials, e.g. posters, signs, handbills, brochures, or pamphlets. Posting, affixing, or otherwise attaching authorized afore mentioned materials on or in unauthorized places including but not limited to trees, shrubbery, sidewalks, buildings, and lawn areas without permission from the appropriate CCS official.
  10. Engaging or participating in unauthorized possession or use of explosives, firearms, dangerous weapons, or other hazardous objects or substances. Weapons, explosives, and other hazardous objects or substances covered by this regulation shall include, but not be limited to, the following:
    • all handguns, rifles, and shotguns;
    • all longbows, crossbows, and arrows;
    • all knives having a blade length of three inches or more that are not solely used for the purpose of creating art or for the preparation and eating of meals;
    • all BB guns, pellet guns, air/CO2 guns, blow guns, paint guns, splat balls and altered toy guns;
    • all fireworks;
    • all explosives, laboratory chemicals, dangerous compounds, gunpowder, firearm ammunition, and flammable petroleum fuels;
    • any martial arts weapons, e.g., numb chucks and throwing stars;
    • any substance that is considered poisonous:
    • any item used as a weapon in the commission of a crime; and
    • any operative animal trap or other device that is used to ensnare animals.
  11. Committing acts of arson, creating a fire hazard, or possessing or using, for purposes other than academic, inflammable materials or hazardous substances on CCS property, or failing to properly store, use, clean-up and dispose of hazardous substances that have been approved for academic use.
  12. Committing acts that endanger the property of CCS (including but not limited to altering or misusing any firefighting equipment, safety equipment, or emergency device).
  13. Making false reports of a fire, bomb threat, or other dangerous condition; failing to report a fire, or interfering with the response of CCS or municipal officials to emergency calls.
  14. Failing to comply with the directions of CCS officials acting in the performance of their duties and/or failing to positively identify oneself to a CCS official when requested to do so. The preferred form of identification shall be a current, valid CCS identification card.
  15. Aiding and abetting another person in committing an act that violates the Code of Student Conduct.
  16. Committing acts of dishonesty including but not limited to the following:
    • engaging or participating in cheating, plagiarism, or other forms of academic dishonesty (students committing acts of academic dishonesty are also subject to academic sanctions).
    • furnishing false information to any CCS official/office or outside source regarding CCS or a CCS community member.
    • forging, altering, or misusing any CCS document, record, or instrument of identification.
    • tampering with the election of any CCS-recognized student organization.
    • attempting to represent CCS, any recognized student organization, or any official CCS group without the explicit prior consent of the officials of that group.
  17. Gambling on CCS property or engaging in unauthorized canvassing or solicitation.
  18. Engaging in acts of theft, misuse or abuse of the CCS computer network, including but not limited to:
    • unauthorized entry into a file, to use, read, or change its contents.
    • unauthorized transfer, deletion or storage of a file(s).
    • unauthorized use of another person’s login/password.
    • use of computing facilities/networks to interfere with the work of another.
    • use of computing facilities/networks to send inappropriate or obscene messages.
    • use of computing facilities/networks to interfere with the normal operation of CCS.
  19. Possessing, distributing or being under the influence of cannabis (marijuana) or any State or Federally controlled substance except as expressly permitted by law.
  20. Possessing, distributing or being under the influence alcohol except as expressly permitted by law and CCS policy.
  21. Engaging or participating in abuse of the campus judicial system, including but not limited to:
    • falsifying or misrepresenting information before a CCS official.
    • disrupting or interfering with the orderly conduct of a judicial proceeding.
    • instituting a judicial complaint knowingly without cause.
    • attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in, or use of, the judicial proceeding.
    • attempting to influence the impartiality of a CCS official prior to, during, and/or after a judicial proceeding.
    • harassing (verbal or physical) and/or intimidating a CCS official prior to, during, and/or after a judicial proceeding.
    • failing to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under the Code of Student Conduct.
    • influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the campus judicial system.
  22. Planning, directing, or committing acts of hazing, defined as any activity which willfully or recklessly endangers the physical or mental health of an individual or subjects an individual to ridicule, embarrassment, or unlawful activity for the purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in, an officially or unofficially recognized group or organization.
  23. Committing violations of rules and regulations duly established and promulgated by other CCS departments.
  24. Desktop (non-portable) vaporizers are not permitted to be used inside CCS Academic Facilities or Residence Halls. Portable vaporizers are permitted to be used in common areas of the building provided that the do not create a distraction or nuisance to the educational environment or other CCS community members.
  25. Failure to comply with the policies implemented to mitigate COVID-19 pandemic spread. Violations could include, but not limited to: failure to wear a mask in public areas, failure to adhere to social distancing guidelines, violation of COVID-19 specific guest policies, failure to self-isolate when directed to do so, etc.