Student Domestic Travel

Policy Statement, Purpose, and Scope

The College for Creative Studies encourages student exploration and travel. Off-campus experiences support institutional learning outcomes and expand students’ experience and perspective. The College seeks to ensure the safety of students and mitigate risks associated with off-campus exploration; hence, this policy and its adjacent procedures were established to offer minimum requirements for student travel. Additional standards may be enacted for specific trips by the Trip Leader or Responsible Administrator.

The Student Domestic Travel Policy establishes guidelines to ensure adequate College oversight of travel programs, maintain quality and consistency among programs, and allow for appropriate response should an emergency arise. The purpose of the policy is to ensure that adequate planning, supervision, and organization is in place for safe student domestic travel and to firm an approval and accountability structure.  

This policy applies to domestic travel of any enrolled students to attend activities or events that are:

  • Organized or sponsored by the College for Creative Studies, or travel in which the students act as representatives of the College, and
  • Occurring off the CCS campus and/or extending overnight.
  • This policy does not apply to travel undertaken for internships, student teaching, observations, residencies, or research (unless the research is organized by a faculty member). Travel undertaken by students who are also College employees traveling in their capacity as employees is not covered in this policy and will be handled in the same manner as employee travel.

CCS Student Domestic Travel requires a named Trip Leader, Trip Coordinator, and Responsible Administrator. These parties will ensure that travel is planned and executed in accordance with the CCS Student Domestic Travel Policy and Guidelines and will manage issues as they arise.

Reason for Policy

This policy ensures the consistent handling and oversight of student domestic travel. It provides clear instructions related to approvals and accountability and creates guidelines to ensure the safety of all participants.

Definitions

Academic Travel provides opportunity for students to meet learning outcomes for a course of study or prepare for a specified career path (i.e. conferences, portfolio reviews, studio tours)

The Clery Act is a consumer protection law that provides transparency related to crime policy and statistics. CCS is required to disclose any crime information that occurs on or near campus, or on non-campus property the College has entered an agreement to use (i.e. reserved lodging, agreed upon use in a host facility).

The College defines co-curricular learning as learning activities, programs, and experiences that reinforce the institution’s mission and values and complement the formal curriculum. Examples of Co-Curricular Travel may include student-faculty research experiences, service learning, professional clubs or organizations, career services, etc.

An Enrolled Student is any CCS student, graduate, undergraduate, non-matriculating, or PreCollege and Continuing Studies, who is enrolled in courses at the College, including College break periods and summers between enrolled periods. Only CCS staff, faculty, and enrolled students may participate in College-sponsored domestic student travel. If an exception is necessary, the approval of the Responsible Administrator is required.

The Responsible Administrator is a Dean, Department Chair, Director of an administrative unit, or their delegate who offers approval for the travel and any associated expenditures, as well as authorizing policy exceptions.

A Trip Leader is typically a full-time faculty or staff member(s) responsible for trip planning, student preparation, and supervision of students on the trip. Adjunct Instructors or part-time employees must be approved by the Responsible Administrator prior to the trip being approved.

The Trip Coordinator is the staff member responsible for oversight of trip planning and execution. The Coordinator will work with the Trip Leader to complete Business Services documentation and aid with trip planning and reservations as needed.

Title IX –The College subscribes to the principle of equal opportunity in its employment, admissions, and educational practices, including travel, and strives to provide an educational environment and workplace free from unlawful harassment or discrimination. Discrimination, including harassment, because of age, race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, disability or any other characteristic protected by law is strictly prohibited.

Academic Travel

Student travel can be an important component of a student’s learning experience at CCS. Class field trips and departmental group travel can enhance the content of a course or academic endeavor by providing experiences that cannot be conveyed in a classroom. As the intent of academic travel is usually to meet learning outcomes for a course of study or prepare for a specified career path, faculty are expected to act as Trip Leaders.

  1. Chaperones are required for all College-sponsored student domestic travel. A full outline of the chaperone policy, including the number of students allowed per chaperone, can be found here. Any exceptions to this requirement should be requested through the Chaperone Waiver form found at the above link.
  2. Field trips that are expected for a course must be listed on the class syllabus.
  3. Funding for Student Domestic Travel, including field trips, comes from the involved students and the department if additional funding is required. The faculty may submit a Student Domestic Travel Funding Request to the Office of Academic Affairs after receiving approval from the Department Chair. All monies due from students for a given trip must be paid to CCS before leaving on the trip, with no exceptions. Subsequent to the trip, proper accounting, including all appropriate receipts, must be made of all funds expended. The forms to be used in this accounting may be obtained from the Business Office.

Co-Curricular Travel

Co-Curricular travel can foster the development of soft or cross-cutting skills such as teamwork, communication, problem solving, and interpersonal relations.

The requirements for Co-Curricular student domestic travel are the same as academic travel; the only difference lies in who may act as Trip Leader and who is asked to serve as Trip Coordinator. Staff members may act as Trip Leaders for Co-Curricular travel. Co-curricular travel is often coordinated through various Enrollment and Student Services Offices.

Related Policies/Forms


Student Domestic Travel Guidelines

Trip Leader


Expectations of Travel Participants

Prior to Travel Commencing

Proposal

The Trip Leader and Coordinator will work together to develop a travel proposal, inclusive of budget estimations, and submit the completed Student Domestic Travel Funding Request. When possible, requests for overnight stays or travel outside of a 50 mile radius should typically be submitted three months in advance of the travel. For local travel, a funding request should typically be submitted three weeks in advance. As part of the proposal process, the Trip Leader should speak with their supervisors regarding coverage for their on-campus responsibilities should the trip be approved.

Planning

Upon approval of the travel proposal, the Trip Leader and Trip Coordinator will communicate fundraising/personal contribution expectations to student participants and the Trip Leader will develop a loose itinerary. If the travel is not specific to a certain class, the Trip Leader and Trip Coordinator will work together to promote the travel opportunity to students.

The Trip Coordinator will maintain a list of students who will participate in the travel, limiting capacity in accordance with budget and number of chaperones. A waitlist will also be maintained in case any of the initial participants are unable to attend.

If the travel will take place within a single day, the Trip Leader will provide students direction for the trip via email and/or the College’s learning management system the day prior to travel. This communication will include:

  • Firmed travel itinerary
  • Other chaperones (if applicable)
  • Transportation details
  • How meals will be handled (if applicable)
  • Expected student expenses – meal, coat check, etc.
  • Behavioral expectations for the trip, i.e. Student Code of Conduct
  • Appropriate attire
  • Necessary gear/materials/tools
  • Risks associated with the trip
  • Need to keep on person at all times – health insurance information and emergency contact
  • Direction should an emergency arise

For travel involving an overnight stay, the Trip Leader, in coordination with the Trip Coordinator, will schedule an orientation for all travel participants. This orientation will take place at least one week prior to the commencement of travel. The orientation will provide the information listed for single day trips, as well as details on the following content.

  • Route
  • Rest and meal stops
  • Lodging
  • Proper identification/health information

Required Forms/Lists

The Trip Leader must have students sign the Field Trip form for all student travel. Completed forms, as well as a Participant List containing student name, student number, cell phone number, and emergency contact information must be submitted by the Trip Coordinator to the Trip Leader, Dean of Students (if overnight travel), and Responsible Administrator at least ten days prior to travel commencing.

While Traveling

Supervision/Direction

While traveling, the Trip Leader is responsible for maintaining an accurate accounting of all participating students. The itinerary communicated prior to the trip should be followed as closely as is feasible.

If the Trip Leader is the sole chaperone for the trip, they must be available to trip participants at all times and be lodged in the same place (as applicable), though they may not share a room with students. If there is an additional chaperone(s) on the trip, oversight breaks may be scheduled with coverage by the chaperone(s).

Alcohol and/or cannabis consumption by Trip Leaders is prohibited while chaperoning student trips, unless there is a chaperone who can respond to an emergency in their stead. If a Trip Leader imbibes, they need to do so in accordance with the dictates offered in the College’s Travel and Entertainment Policy and Alcohol and Other Drug Policy.

The Trip Leader must follow all dictates as set forth by the CCS Chaperone Policy, as well as those in the Travel and Entertainment Policy.

Emergencies

Trip Leaders will carry with them – on their body – the emergency contact information for all participants.

The Trip Leader must report any incident resulting in injury or property loss, criminal activity, violation of trip rules or Student Code of Conduct, emergencies, or any other unusual activity to the Trip Coordinator and Responsible Administrator as soon as practicable following the incident. In the case of a true emergency, the Trip Leader is responsible for calling 911 and/or the local authorities.

Upon Return

Receipt Submittal

Within seven business days of the end of the travel period, the Trip Leader must submit all travel receipts and the remaining funds from any advances received to the Trip Coordinator.

Reporting

A Trip Evaluation Form for Faculty/Staff must be submitted by the Trip Leader to their department Program Manager (as applicable) for use in the Academic Affairs Monthly Report within the same seven-day period. 

A Student Trip Evaluation form link should be sent within three days of the return by the Trip Coordinator. Completed evaluation forms will be made available to the department/office and sponsoring departments by Academic Affairs.

Travel sponsors may require additional reporting from the trip.

Other Chaperones (as applicable)

As stated in the CCS Chaperone Policy, chaperones are typically full-time faculty, staff, or graduate assistants. For academic travel, faculty typically serve in this role. Chaperones are expected to work with the Trip Leader in planning and implementing the travel. Chaperones do not have responsibilities related to reporting or receipt reconciliation.

Trip Coordinator

Prior to Travel Commencing

The Trip Coordinator works with the Trip Leader, aiding in proposal research and trip planning as needed, aiding in the completion and submittal of the Student Domestic Travel Funding Request form, and making reservations for transport, lodging, and access for group participants (i.e. conference fees, museum tickets). The Trip Coordinator also works with the Trip Leader to promote the travel opportunity (as appropriate), conduct an orientation (when needed), and management of the travel budget. The Trip Coordinator is also responsible for liaising with Business Services to set up an account for student deposits.

Prior to travel commencing, the Trip Coordinator is responsible for ensuring that the Trip Leader has submitted Field Trip forms for all participants. The Trip Coordinator will create a Participant List for the Trip Leader and for use internally. The Trip Coordinator will forward this Participant List to the Trip Leader, Dean of Students (if overnight travel), and Responsible Administrator ten days prior to the trip commencing.

While Travel is Taking Place

Trip Coordinators are on on-call status during the duration of the trip, as they will act as liaison between the Trip Leader and the Responsible Administrator should questions or an emergency arise.

Upon Return

Once the travel is complete, Trip Coordinators are responsible for reconciling the travel expenses. Trip Leaders are to submit all receipts from the travel to the Trip Coordinator within seven business days of return. Trip Leaders will also submit a trip evaluation form on the travel. Additional reporting on the trip, in the form of exhibitions, debriefs, etc. may also be expected from trip sponsors; Trip Coordinators will aid in planning for these events as applicable. Trip Coordinators will also communicate with the Trip Leader and all participants regarding the Student Trip Evaluation form.

Responsible Administrator

Prior to Travel Commencing

The Responsible Administrator for student domestic travel is named on the Student Domestic Travel Funding Request form and offers approval for the trip proposal.

While Travel is Taking Place

Responsible Administrators are on on-call status during the duration of the trip, as they may need to respond to questions or offer direction should an emergency arise.

Upon Return

Dependent on the size of the expenditure, Responsible Administrators may be called upon to approve expenditures/reconciliation reports resulting from the travel. Responsible Administrators have the discretion to require additional travel reporting from Trip Leaders, regardless of whether their office sponsored the travel financially.

Student Participants

Prior to Travel Commencing

Students who wish to participate in domestic travel opportunities are expected to carefully consider the trip information provided to them from the Trip Leader and reflect on their own ability to successfully participate in the travel before signing up for the trip. Though students are not required to pay for required class field trips, travel that is not required will typically entail a cost to the student. Students participating in travel may need to miss other classes or commitments – students should ensure that trading one experience for the other is the best choice for them before committing to the trip. Students participating in travel opportunities are expected to attend pre-trip orientations (as applicable), fundraise (as needed), and meet any obligations (surveys, submission of work, etc.) that follow the trip. Finally, while traveling, the Student Code of Conduct and all other policies of the College, as well as any rules set for the by the Trip Leader, are in effect and students wishing to participate in travel must be willing to follow these dictates. Student travelers represent the College and it is imperative that they behave in accordance with the institution’s best interest.

Student travelers should be aware that the College assumes no responsibility in providing participating students funds in the case of an emergency. Participating students should be prepared to assume the costs of their travel, lodging, and food in the case of unanticipated delays or other incidents requiring additional expenditures, as well as any uncovered medical costs.

The Students Affairs office will consider student participant names as they deposit. Students not in good judicial standing may not be permitted to attend overnight trips.

Students participating in domestic travel will also need to submit a Field Trip form prior to traveling.

While Traveling

As stated, all students participating in domestic travel opportunities must adhere to the Student Code of Conduct and all other policies of the College, as well as any rules set by the Trip Leader. Failure to comply may hinder future participation in travel opportunities.

No student is permitted to leave the group, and no student shall be left behind during a trip unless required by circumstances approved by the Responsible Administrator.

Alcohol, cannabis, or illegal substance consumption by students of any age is prohibited during College-sponsored domestic student travel.

Students are expected to approach the Trip Leader or chaperone(s) (if applicable) with any incident resulting in injury or property loss, criminal activity, violation of trip rules or Student Code of Conduct, emergencies, or any other unusual activity that takes place on the trip.

If a student needs to return early from the trip for any reason, the Trip Leader, in consultation with the Trip Coordinator and Responsible Administrator, will determine if that student should be accompanied by a fellow trip participant.

Upon Return

Were any expenses incurred that are approved for repayment, students must submit the relevant receipts to the Trip Coordinator within seven days of return.

If a post-trip event is planned – a presentation on the travel, an exhibition of work inspired by the travel, debrief meeting, etc. – students are expected to participate.

Travel Budget

Funding Sources

Student domestic travel is typically funded via student fundraising and individual student contribution. If the travel is required or offered as part of a sponsored research project, the budget for that project will typically cover the associated costs. Funds are also available through the Academic Affairs office, Student Affairs office, Student Government, and individual program budgets, though the allocation is based on strict criteria developed by each group and usually covers only a portion of the full cost. The criterion for funds available from each office is available on the Campus Offices, Academic Affairs site.

The Trip Leader and Trip Coordinator are responsible for developing a budget associated with any student travel with four or more student participants. The cost for chaperone travel is included in this estimate. Once the budget is known, the Trip Leader, in coordination with the Trip Coordinator, may submit a Student Domestic Travel Funding Request form to seek funding from College offices. Requests for funding typically require three weeks for full processing. Once the Student Domestic Travel Funding Request form is returned to the Trip Coordinator with allocations detailed, the Trip Leader and Coordinator will work with the student group to guide fundraising efforts in accordance with the Student Fundraising Policy and determine individual student commitments. The cost of attendance for each student, both if fundraising goals are met and if they are not, will be clearly indicated on all promotional materials and communication relating to the travel.

If the travel is cancelled, the Trip Coordinator is responsible for communicating the cancellation to the Trip Leader, Responsible Administrator, participating students, and any offices that allocated funding for the travel within three business days of cancellation.

Student Deposits

Students are expected to deposit half the cost of the trip or $50, whichever is less, to the Business Services office at least five weeks prior to overnight trips as a good faith deposit. Three weeks prior to the trip is a drop-dead date – students wishing to withdraw from the trip after that date will be liable for all expenses incurred. These funds will not be returned if the student chooses not to attend unless an exception is granted by the Responsible Administrator. A wait list will be kept for all student travel with more prospective attendees than available spaces. Waitlisted students are not responsible for submitting deposits until they are confirmed as travelers.

Final student payment for the trip is due to Business Services seven business days prior to the trip. If final payment is not made by this date, students will lose their deposit, as well as their ability to participate, and their space will be given to a waitlisted participant.

Student travel requires clear financial commitment by a known number of participants. If too few students participate, the cost increases for all and the travel may no longer be financially feasible. The Trip Leader and Trip Coordinator will make this determination one week prior to the trip and if the travel is cancelled, coordinate the return of all student deposits.

Reservations/Advance Vendor Payments

Trip Coordinators will typically have a College-provided credit card to use for reservations and vendor payments (conference fees, pre-purchase tickets, etc.). As much as possible, charges should be applied to College credit cards prior to trip commencement rather than paid out of pocket at the time of service by the Trip Leader. All arrangements will be made in accordance with the Travel and Entertainment Policy.

Advances

Cash advances are available for the Trip Leader to pay for costs associated with group meals, ground transport, etc. It is expected that these advances will be requested and reconciled in accordance with the directives offered in the CCS Travel and Entertainment Policy.

Logistics

The College’s Travel and Entertainment Policy offers standard guidelines for faculty and staff travel. The guidance in this section is additional and does not supersede or replace the requirements listed in that Policy.

Transportation

Air Travel

Air travel for student trips presents additional complications and should be used as a mode of transport only when neither vehicle nor train travel would make sense in the given circumstance.

  • All domestic air travelers must have Real-ID compliant Driver’s License or valid passport. Students should be made aware of this requirement as early in the trip planning process as possible so that those without this documentation might have time to apply for and receive these documents prior to the trip.
  • College policy states that airline reservation purchases should be as economical as possible; typically, this means that the tickets will be non-refundable.

If making reservations for a group, representative help can be requested from most airlines. Prior to purchasing airline reservations, the Trip Leader and Coordinator must ensure that all participating students and chaperones (as applicable) are committed to the trip, meet appropriate requirements for travel participants, have completed the Field Trip Form and have, or have the ability to obtain prior to the trip, either a Real-ID Compliant Driver’s License or valid passport.

The College has a corporate rewards program member with Delta Airlines. If purchases are made for this airline, please click that box, choose Delta Air Lines SkyBonus, and use code ESLE7.

The cost of mileage to and from the airport and airport parking for the students, Trip Leader, and Chaperone(s) (as applicable) should be included in the trip budget.

Automobiles

INDIVIDUALLY OWNED

Personal vehicles are used on a voluntary basis and the owners/drivers must have their own insurance coverage and a valid driver’s license. The College does not insure or accept any liability for damage, loss, or injury resulting from the use of a private vehicle. The College does not provide comprehensive or collision (physical damage) insurance for personal vehicles driven on College business. The College does not carry non-owner excess liability insurance to protect the College and employee or student in the event of a suit resulting from an automobile accident in which an employee or student was driving on College business.

If personal vehicles are used for student domestic travel, the costs for mileage and parking (if any), should be included when developing the budget for the trip.  Student, Trip Leader and chaperone(s) (as applicable) mileage and parking should be included in the trip budget, and the cost reimbursed. Itemized receipts and adherence to direction offered in the Travel and Entertainment policy are expected.

CARPOOLING

Students cannot be asked to carpool, but they may choose to do so voluntarily. Please note the liability statements offered in the above section.

Faculty and chaperone(s) should not provide rides to students in their personal vehicles.

RENTED VEHICLES

Rental vehicle use for student domestic travel is rare and must be approved by the Responsible Administrator. The driver of the vehicle will need to be properly licensed and insured for the rented vehicle and receive College permission from Campus Safety/Facilities to chauffer students.

Bus

Charter buses can be an economical choice for travel with large groups. Reservations typically entail agreement via a contract; hence, the Responsible Administrator needs to approve this mode of travel, as does the Vice President of Administration and Finance who approves all contracts with the College. The bus company will need to provide evidence of adequate insurance coverage for personal injury and property damage.

Train

As with airline reservation purchases, train tickets are rarely refundable. Prior to the purchase of tickets, the Trip Leader and Coordinator must ensure that all participating students and chaperones (as applicable) are committed to the trip, meet appropriate requirements for travel participants, have completed the Field Trip Form and have, or have the ability to obtain prior to the trip, valid photo identification.

If traveling by train, the itinerary should make allowances for a variance in arrival schedule.

Local Transport at Location

Local transport (i.e. local buses, subways, taxi services, ride share, bicycle rentals, etc.) once all participants reach the location will be planned in accordance with the budget and itinerary created during the trip preparation phase.

Local transport costs that are included as part of the trip budget will be paid for by the Troop Leader or a designated chaperone (as applicable). Per the Travel and Entertainment policy, receipts must be submitted to the Trip Coordinator upon return for reconciliation/reimbursement purposes.

Participants bear the responsibility of paying for any local transport needs not included in the itinerary. 

Lodging

Trip Leaders and chaperone(s) and student participants are expected to lodge in the same facility, but never the same room. Any exceptions to this will need to be approved by the Responsible Administrator prior to the trip commencing. The cost of lodging for all participants is to be paid from the trip budget, rather than individually. No member of the College may house students in an apartment, home, or other facility owned by any faculty or staff member.

Typically, travel participants on overnight trips will stay in a hostel or moderately priced hotel/motel. Personal charges (videos, room service, etc.) are not allowed. Lodging charges will usually be paid via the College credit card used to reserve the space. The Trip Leader is responsible for canceling unneeded lodging. It is expected that the guidelines offered by the lodging establishment for cancellations be followed.

On occasion, rental properties may be used to house domestic travel participants. This mode of lodging must be approved by the Responsible Administrator, as well as the Vice President of Administration and Finance if a contract is required.

Meals

Meals will be planned in accordance with the budget and itinerary created during the trip preparation phase.

Group meals that are included as part of the cost of the trip will be paid for by the Trip Leader or a designated chaperone (as applicable). Per the Travel and Entertainment policy, the itemized receipt (not summarized credit card receipt) for these meals must be submitted to the Trip Coordinator upon return for reconciliation/reimbursement purposes.

Student participants bear the responsibility of paying for individual meals or snacks not included in the cost of the trip. The individual meals of the Trip Leader and chaperone(s) (as applicable) should be included in the trip budget, though snacks are purchased at personal cost. Itemized receipts and adherence to direction offered in the Travel and Entertainment policy are expected.

Accommodations for Participants with Disabilities

If a student participant with a disability requires accommodation to participate in the trip, the Trip Leader and Coordinator should contact the Dean of Students for assistance in providing reasonable accommodations. If the Trip Leader or a chaperone (as applicable) require accommodation for a disability to participate, the Director of Human Resources should be contacted.

Protecting Students Abroad

Purpose and Scope

The purpose of this policy is to promote the health, wellness, safety and security of CCS students who participate in CCS Study Abroad Programs.  The College requires all CCS administrators, faculty, staff, and volunteers working with CCS students in College Sponsored Study Abroad Programs or affiliated Study Abroad Programs (in a CCS contractual relationship) to comply with this policy.

Definitions

  • Authorized Program Staff: Individuals, paid or unpaid, who interact with, supervise, or otherwise oversee CCS Students in program activities. This includes but is not limited to faculty, staff, volunteers, graduate and undergraduate students, and independent contractors/consultants. The Authorized Program Staff’s roles may include positions as, leaders, instructors, guides, etc.  For the purposes of this policy the term “Program Staff” is also assigned this definition. This definition does not include temporary guest speakers, presenters, or other individuals who have no direct contact with Program participants other than short-term activities supervised by Program Staff.
  • College Facilities: Facilities owned by or under the control of the College including housing and Program space. CCS Property is extended to include any buildings or sites in foreign countries which are used for the purpose of hosting a CCS faculty led and/or CCS affiliated study abroad program. Examples of such property include, studios, housing, and instructional sites.
  • College Sponsored Programs: Programs that are directly managed by College faculty, staff, and Sponsored Student Organizations on behalf of the College.
  • Direct Contact: Providing care, supervision, guidance or control of CCS Students or having routine interaction with CCS Students.
  • Non-College Sponsored Programs: Programs that are not operated on behalf of the College or under the College’s control.
  • One-on-One Contact: Personal interaction between any Authorized Program Staff and a participant without at least one other Authorized Program Staff, being present.
  • Program: Programs or activities offered by various academic or administrative units of the College, or by non-College groups affiliated with the College where CCS students are involved. This includes, CCS faulty Led Study Abroad Programs, or Faculty led trips which employ external agencies to administer their programs.  This does not include out-side programs that may enroll CCS students.
  • Program Manager: The person(s) who has primary and direct operational responsibility for managing a Program.
  • ISSO: The International Student Services Office at CCS

Criminal Background Check Requirement:

All individuals involved with a CCS faculty Led Student Abroad Program whom will have direct contact with CCS students are subject to submit a criminal background check and may be asked to comply with this requirement. The following types of convictions will render an individual ineligible to work or volunteer for the College’s Study Abroad Programs:

  • Drug distribution activity or felony drug possession
  • Sexual offenses
  • Crimes of violence involving physical injury to another person
  • Child abuse, molestation or other crimes involving child endangerment
  • Murder
  • Kidnapping
  • Any other crime involving moral turpitude

Operational Requirements

The Study Abroad Authorized Program Staff Responsibilities:

  • Serve as a resource and emergency contact to the group.
  • Remain with the group for the duration of the trip.
  • Be the point of contact between the group participants, and College officials as needed.
  • Be familiar with all College rules and regulations that both individuals, and groups must adhere to including:
  • Be prepared to respond to emergency and crisis protocol to ensure a safe environment and experience to all students.
  • Be prepared to adhere to all reporting requirements in regards to crime, behavioral, and sexual assault/violence.
  • Review program itineraries prior to the trip and discuss any concerns with the organization.
  • Ensure all participants are enrolled in the CCS Travel Registry prior to travel
  • Promote, and ensure compliance with mandatory enrollment of all participants in Emergency Travel and Medical Insurance and mandatory natural or political crisis Evacuation Insurance according to the International Travel Policy.
  • Collect the following information from all participants prior to the trip is scheduled to begin:
    • Passport information page copy
    • Emergency contact form
    • Health insurance and Health information form
    • Assumption of Risk Release Form
  • Make sure a final list of participants, and above mentioned information is sent to the department of International Student Services (ISSO) to be loaded into a mutually accessible database. Program Staff should also carry this information with them on the trip as both hard, and digital copies.
  • Ensure all participants are aware of travel details and trip itinerary in the form of a program handbook.

Program Handbook:

The office/department leading a Study Abroad program must develop and distribute a program handbook to participants. The International Student Services Office, can provide a general template and should be consulted in the content prior to distribution to students.

 The Program Handbook must include the following information:

  • Emergency Procedures: Procedures for notifying the college and the student’s emergency contact, in case of emergency, including medical or behavioral situations.
  • Student Emergency Contact: Information on the student’s emergency contact on how to reach them during the program.
  • Student Health Form: Information on the student’s health insurance, proof of travel insurance and specific health concerns that the program leadership should be aware of.
  • How to prepare for healthy travel- travel health clinic information and CCS Wellness Center contact information
  • Program Contact Information: Information for the student to share with their personal contacts on how to reach the Program leadership and CCS leadership while abroad.
  • Program itinerary: This should include the exact location of the participants with corresponding dates, and address. Include information regarding “free” days in which students will travel on their own.
  • Program rules: Including the CCS student code of conduct and specific cultural expectations, for participants in the program, including the fact that participants must abide by all College regulations and may be removed from the program for violation of such rules.
  • The Assumption of Risk Form: A basic contract signed by students that reviews the risks, and responsibilities involved with Study Abroad.
  • A description of the process to be followed if a participant, group leader, or other individual associated with the study abroad program is alleged to have violated College policies or conduct rules of the program, including the process for dismissal and removal from the program.
  • Title IX policy and reporting requirements:  For review by participants, and to reinforce acknowledgement of study abroad program compliance with this policy.
  • A country profile outlining regionally specific risks, and cultural information to be noted for US travelers
  • Local US embassy contact information
  • How to register for the SMART traveler program with the US State Department
  • Travel Visa requirements for destination
  • Requirement to enroll in the CCS Travel Registry

Program Leadership Pre-Departure session:

Study Abroad program leadership are required to meet with the International Student Services Office prior to departure to review the following procedures:

  1. International Travel Policy
  2. Protecting Students Participating in College Programs or Activities

An understanding agreement will be signed following the meeting and will kept on file with the college.

Student Pre-Departure session:

It is encouraged to hold an in person group meeting prior to departure with the students and leadership to review the handbook information and collect required forms.

Conduct Rules for Program Leadership:

Program Staff should be positive role models and behave in a responsible manner that is consistent with the mission of the College and adhere to the policies in the CCS Staff Handbook.

Program Staff are required to comply with all applicable laws and College policy. Program Staff working in Study Abroad Programs covered by this policy must follow these expectations to avoid conduct that could cause harm or be misinterpreted:

  • Do not engage in any sexual activity, make sexual comments, tell sexual jokes, or share sexually explicit material with CCS Students or assist in any way to provide access to such materials.
  • Do not engage or allow CCS Students to engage you in romantic or sexual conversations, or related matters.
  • Do not touch a CCS Students in a manner that a reasonable person could interpret as inappropriate. Touching should generally only be in the open and in response to the Student’s needs, for a purpose that is consistent with the Program’s mission and culture, or for a clear educational, developmental, or health related purpose (i.e., treatment of an injury). Any resistance from the student should be respected.
  • Do not use profanity, vulgarity, or harassing language.
  • Do not be alone with a single student. If One-on-One interaction is required, meet in open, well illuminated spaces or rooms with windows observable by other Program Staff.
  • Do not meet with students outside of established times for Program activities. If this is required, please include more than one Program Staff.
  • Do not invite students to your home or other private locations.
  • Do not provide gifts to students or their families independent of items provided by the Program.
  • Communication with students must be educational or programmatic in purpose and the content of the communication must be consistent with the mission of the Program and the College.
  • Do not engage in any abusive conduct of any kind toward, or in the presence of, a student including but not limited to verbal abuse, striking, hitting, punching, poking, spanking, or restraining. If restraint is necessary to protect a student or other student from harm, all incidents must be documented and disclosed to the College Administration.
  • Do not use, possess or be under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs while responsible for a student’s welfare.
  • Do not provide alcohol or illegal drugs to any students at any time during the study abroad program.
  • Do not provide medication to a student
  • Do not possess any type of weapon or explosive device.

Drug and Alcohol Policy:

All members of the CCS community also are governed by laws, regulations, and ordinances established by the state and local municipalities and will be held accountable by law enforcement representatives of those entities for any illegal activity. It is the responsibility of all campus members to be aware of these laws. This includes international laws in host countries in which our staff, and student are traveling on College Sponsored Programs. Faculty cannot provide alcohol to CCS students, regardless of the legal drinking age of the country in which the Study Abroad Program is situated. Study Abroad locations are considered “on-campus” for purposes of this policy.

Reporting Protocols:

  • Faculty and staff responsible for student’s abroad must report:
    • Sexual assault and misconduct
    • Violations of conduct by students, program leadership, or affiliated constituents
    • Crimes committed to or by programs participants, or leadership
    • Emergencies of any nature

Title IX Coordinator
Dierdre Young
Assistant Dean for Institutional Equity and Inclusion
Institutional Equity and Inclusion
313-664-1489
ddyoung@collegeforcreativestudies.edu

Deputy Title IX Coordinator
Raquel Diroff
Assistant Human Resources Director
Office of Human Resources
313-664-7651
rdiroff@collegeforcreativestudies.edu

For all other reporting:

 Information will be given to the appropriate office on campus and/or CCS Crisis Management Team.

Katherine Campbell
Director of International Student Services
Office of International Student Services (ISSO)
Office: +1 (31)3-664-7448
Cell: +1 (313)-920-1296
kcampbell@collegeforcreativestudies.edu

Dan Long
Dean of Students
Office: +1 (313)-664-7675
Cell: +1 (248)-310-9571
Office of Student Affairs
dlong@collegeforcreativestudies.edu

Conduct Violations and Crime Reporting:

 CCS encourages all members of the College for Creative Studies community to engage in accurate and prompt reporting of all crimes to Campus Security and the appropriate law enforcement agencies, when the victim of the crime elects not to, or is unable to, make such a report. While abroad please work within the local law enforcement agencies, and report incidents to the college administration immediately.

Title IX Reporting:  

The Title IX reporting responsibilities of CCS Study Abroad Leadership apply while abroad. All College community members are strongly encouraged to report incidents of sexual misconduct to the Title IX Coordinator or any of the reporting resources listed below, by phone, email, or in person.

Behavior violations resulting program expulsion for students:

In the event of an incident/infraction where there is an allegation of a violation of the laws, regulations, and customs of the host country, community, institution or program or a violation of the CCS College Code of Conduct, but does not cause immediate danger to others, the following procedures will apply:

Student Behavioral Procedure:

1. VERBAL NOTIFICATION: The faculty member-in-residence or program assistant representing the Office of Academic Affairs (referred to as the “leader or mentor”) will investigate the alleged violation using the resources available to him or her. They will have a frank discussion with the student of expectations and consequences, giving the student an opportunity to respond in person and present any witnesses or ask questions of witnesses, if any, that the complainant has identified.

2. WRITTEN NOTIFICATION: The student will receive a written notification of the expectations and consequences. This is the final warning and any continuation of the undesirable behavior will result in immediate dismissal with no refund academic credit and grade will be awarded according to college policy.

3. DISMISSAL: If, after the facts have been examined and after discussion and authorization from the Office of Academic Affairs, it has been decided to dismiss the student from the program, the student receives written notification of the decision.  The student is responsible with all costs incurred due to program dismissal.  Upon return to the campus a decision regarding the need for further action will be made.

Behavior violations resulting program expulsion for Staff:

Violations of Staff conduct prior to or during travel will result in immediate removal from the study abroad program and replacement of role by an alternate staff member or potential cancellation of program. The CCS staff handbook, and conduct rules listed in this document policies apply while abroad on a CCS Program.

Emergencies Abroad:

The College has the right to make cancellations, substitutions or changes in case of emergency or changed conditions in the destination country or region. In the case of serious emergency situations, the Program Leadership is responsible for taking immediate care of participants, and notifying the college. The college will utilize its internal Emergency Procedures, and Crisis Management Team as they apply to study abroad, notify all emergency contacts of students and staff, the US Embassy, and other organizations that may aid in securing the safety of our program participants. Students and Program Leadership should take care to ensure their immediate needs and safety and then contact College immediately.

Lost Passports:

You will have to replace the passport before returning to the United States. Contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate for assistance. Ask to speak to the Consular Section to report your passport lost or stolen. If you have been the victim of a serious crime, be sure to tell a consular officer about it as soon as possible so they can provide appropriate assistance. If you are scheduled to leave the foreign country shortly, please provide our consular staff with the details of your travel.

Missing student Policy:

If a student becomes detached from the program group or simply disappears for more than 24 hours, the Program Leadership is required to notify the College Administration. Program leadership must notify the International Student Services Office, who will notify Campus Safety, and the Office of Student Affairs immediately.

 The following information will be collected:

  • Contact Information and relationship to the missing student.
  • Name and vital information about the student reported to be out of contact.
  • The date, time, and location the missing student was last seen.
  • The general routine or habits of the suspected missing person including any recent changes in behavior or demeanor.
  • The missing student’s cell phone number.

Once a report has been made that a student is missing, Campus Safety and the Office of Student Affairs will work together to investigate the situation.

Notifications:

  • CCS leadership will notify the local US Embassy.
  • CCS leadership will notify the student’s emergency contact.
  • No social media outlets should be utilized to communicate.
  • Program Leaders are encouraged to manage the student group appropriately to ensure that communications to media outlets, social media, and outside sources are restricted.
  • CCS leadership will communicate to all media and outside sources.

Mandatory Emergency Insurance:

Students and staff are required to purchase emergency medical and travel insurance that covers the duration of their trip. The insurance policy should include repatriation and evacuation coverage in cases if health emergencies, or death. The emergency insurance policy should also cover travel costs for family members in cases where the participants cannot leave the country in cases of hospitalization.

Evacuation Insurance

In addition to international health insurance for employees and students who travel abroad, we also require evacuation insurance due to natural disasters or political unrest.

SMART traveler enrollment:

https://step.state.gov/

CCS encourages students to enroll in the SMART program prior to college sponsored trips abroad. The Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) is a free service to allow U.S. citizens and nationals traveling and living abroad to enroll their trip with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

  • Receive important information from the Embassy about safety conditions in your destination country, helping you make informed decisions about your travel plans.
  • Help the U.S. Embassy contact you in an emergency, whether natural disaster, civil unrest, or family emergency.
  • Help family and friends get in touch with you in an emergency.

For questions or input on this policy please contact the International Student Services Office.

Related Policies:

Student Travel to High Risk Destinations

College for Creative Studies (CCS) is committed to developing a wide variety of international study opportunities for students; however, the College recognizes that situations exist in which the risks of travel may outweigh the advantages of the international experiences. The International Student Services Office (ISSO) monitors information relevant to the safety of international student travel destinations from official sources as well as from our partners and colleagues abroad. All international travel involving students, must be discussed with the Director of ISSO prior to finalizing travel arrangements. The Director of ISSO will research travel advisories. The College reserves the right to cancel or alter any program when, based on a review of relevant information and resources, we determine that the security or health of students may be threatened.

Statement of Policy:

Destinations (countries, states, or cities) with travel advisory levels 2, 3 or 4 from the United States Department of State (DOS) or under an active travel advisory from the World Health Organization (WHO) and/or Centers for Disease Control (CDC) may be determined to be high-risk travel destinations. All international CCS-related student travel to any such destination requires approval from the High Risk Travel Committee (HRTC); travel to destinations with a level 3 or 4 DOS advisory requires approval from the HRTC and approval by the College’s leadership. A High Risk designation may also be given to countries or regions with a rating of a 4 or 5 (on a scale of 1-5) by the College’s third party travel security firm.

For the purposes of this policy “international CCS-related student travel” is travel promoted or organized by CCS that benefits the student’s academic program (i.e., study abroad, faculty-led study abroad, student exchange, internships); travel done on behalf of CCS; travel that is part of a CCS sponsored program; or, travel using funds processed through CCS. Personal student travel is not covered by this policy.

Advisory Level & Source RequiredDecision/Approval Authority
DOS Level 1 – exercise normal precautionsSubmit travel plan to Director of ISSODirector of ISSO approves
DOS Level 2 – exercise increased precautionsSubmit travel plan to Director of ISSOHRTC approves or consults with College Leadership to finalize decision
WHO/CDC alert or advisoryReceive approval for HRTC
DOS Level 3 – reconsider travelSubmit travel plan to Director of ISSOIf approved by HRTC, must also be approved by College Leadership
DOS Level 4 – do not travelFull HRTC review

Members of High Risk Travel Committee (HRTC):

  • Director of International Student Services
  • Associate Provost
  • Dean of Students
  • Director of Campus Safety
  • Director of Business Services

Process to Request Permission to Travel to a High Risk Destination

Any student, student group, or faculty/staff member leading a student group that would like to participate in an international travel activity to a location determined to be high risk, must seek approval through the CCS High Risk Travel Committee. Depending on the nature of the international student travel, other members of the CCS community may also be asked to participate in the analysis, when appropriate.

The request for permission to travel to a high risk destination should be sent to the Director of International Student Services and must include the following:

  1. The student or the leader of a group of students must complete the Request for Exception to Travel Restrictions form.
  2. A signed Addendum (for each participant) to the CCS Assumption of Risk form that acknowledges the additional risk of the travel destination. (provided by ISSO)
  3. Proof of comprehensive medical insurance coverage and appropriate vaccinations if health risk is present. (Students/faculty)The CCS HRTC will review the request to travel and if approved, will forward the request along with the rationale for approval to CCS College Leadership who will make the final decision if the travel is to a destination with a DOS Level 3 or 4 warning.

Approved travel will have a mandatory pre-departure orientation provided by ISSO. Approvals are for a particular program in a specific location. Approvals for repeated programs are valid for the academic year provided that there is no significant change in the programming or risk level for the location. Even after approval, if the situation deteriorates or the DOS significantly changes its advisory, permission to travel may be revoked at the discretion of the College Leadership.

If the permission to travel is denied, the ISSO will assist the student(s) in planning alternative travel. If the student(s) travel despite the denial:

  • Any travel to the denied destination will be considered personal travel;
  • No logistical support will be provided from the ISSO to travel to denied destinations;
  • No funds processed through CCS may be used for this travel;
  • No academic credit may be granted for activity conducted at the destination whether concurrent with the program or after return;
  • Students’ enrollment at CCS may be terminated for the duration of the travel.

Study Abroad

To be eligible for all study abroad opportunities, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 and written permission from the department chair. Study for an academic semester or year abroad requires that a student be a junior or in the first semester of the senior year. Graduate students should meet with their chair to determine the best semester to participate in a study abroad opportunity. Participation in one of the summer, faculty-led programs is open to all students, regardless of year. Study abroad during the final semester at CCS is not permitted. For more information, please see the Study Abroad Blackboard Page.

Students must meet with the Director of International Student Services and their department chair no later than March 1 for fall or October 1 for winter.

Students must:

  1. Compete the Study Abroad Approval Form and Packet and submit to the International Student Services Office (ISSO)
  2. Comply with the CCS International Travel Policy requirements
  3. Attend a Pre-departure Informational Meeting with the ISSO

All forms are available from the office of International Student Services. The ISSO is located on the 2nd Floor of the Yamasaki Building.

Prohibited Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct (including Title IX)

(updated August 11, 2020)

I. Policy Statement

The College for Creative Studies subscribes to the principle of equal opportunity in its employment, admissions, and educational programs and activities and strives to provide an educational environment and workplace free from unlawful harassment or discrimination. The College is committed to an inclusive community that respects and values all its members, including students, faculty, and staff. This Policy on Prohibited Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct (including Title IX) (“Policy”) prohibits discrimination, including harassment, because of age, race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, marital status, disability or any other characteristic protected by law. This prohibition includes discrimination and harassment based on the perception of an individual’s protected status, even if that perception is incorrect. It also prohibits misconduct related to protected status discrimination and harassment specifically, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. The Policy applies to the administration of employment and educational policies, practices, programs, and activities.

The Policy also prohibits retaliation against an individual: (1) who files a complaint or report of discrimination, harassment, or related misconduct; (2) against whom a complaint is filed; (3) who participates in the reporting, investigation, or adjudication of possible violations of this Policy; or (4) who engages in good faith opposition to what the individual reasonably believes to be discrimination, harassment, or related misconduct under this Policy. The Policy should be read in a way consistent with all applicable federal and state laws addressing discrimination, harassment, and related misconduct.

This Policy specifically prohibits sexual misconduct, including sexual assault, sexual harassment, gender- based harassment, sexual exploitation, stalking, domestic violence, and dating violence. In some cases, this conduct is also prohibited by or included in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and/or the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013. Sexual misconduct represents a serious breach of the College’s commitment to fostering a positive educational and working environment. An individual who violates this Policy may also be subject to criminal prosecution and civil litigation in addition to College disciplinary procedures. As described in the annual security report (see “Sexual Assault/Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Programs”), with the intent of ending sexual misconduct, the College conducts primary prevention and awareness programs for all incoming students and new employees and ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns for students and employees.

The Office for Institutional Equity and Inclusion is responsible for administering this Policy and its implementing procedures. The Title IX Coordinator is the College’s designated Coordinator for Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972; the Dean of Students is the Coordinator for Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 for educational matters and for the Age Discrimination Act of 1975; and the Human Resources Director is the Section 504 Coordinator for employment matters.

Deirdre Young
Assistant Dean, Office for Institutional Equity and Inclusion
Taubman Center
313.664.1487
diversity@collegeforcreativestudies.edu or ddyoung@collegeforcreativestudies.edu

Jody Shipper
Title IX Coordinator
Office for Institutional Equity & Inclusion
313.664.7676
titleix@collegeforcreativestudies.edu

Dan Long
Dean of Students
Yamasaki Building, 2nd Floor
313.664.7675
dlong@collegeforcreativestudies.edu

Raquel Diroff
Director, Human Resources
Yamasaki Building, 2nd Floor
313.664.7651
rdiroff@collegeforcretivestudies.edu

The Policy includes two complaint procedures. The Procedures for Title IX Sexual Misconduct at Appendix A are applicable to sexual harassment, as defined for Title IX purposes; domestic violence; dating violence; and stalking. The Procedures for Discrimination and Harassment Complaints at Appendix B apply to complaints for all conduct prohibited by this Policy except for Title IX sexual misconduct.

II. Scope

All students, faculty, and staff of the College as well as any third parties/visitors, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity, are subject to this Policy. This Policy applies on campus property, and may apply off campus if the alleged conduct was in connection with a College program or College-recognized program or the conduct may have the effect of creating a hostile environment in the College’s classrooms, studios, workspaces, offices, administrative spaces, or other programs or activities. It also applies to the College’s study abroad programs and to study abroad programs operated by other institutions when the alleged sexual misconduct was committed by a College of Creative Studies student. This Policy prohibits sexual misconduct by visitors or other third parties (i.e., persons who are neither students nor employees of the College) towards members of the College community. Although individuals who are not students or employees of the College are not subject to discipline under the College’s internal processes, the College will take prompt, corrective action to remove the accused from campus facilities while under investigation. The College may also involve the police in the immediate resolution of the situation.

Academic Freedom: This Policy shall be applied in way that is consistent with principles of academic freedom. The College is committed to the free and vigorous discussion of ideas and issues, which the College believes will be protected by this Policy. Academic freedom and the related freedom of expression include, but are not limited to, the civil expressions of ideas – however controversial – in the classroom, residence halls, and other teaching and student living environments.

III. Prohibited Conduct

This Policy prohibits all forms of discrimination and harassment based on age, race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, marital status, disability or any other characteristic protected by law:

Discrimination – a discrete adverse action taken by a College official against an applicant, student, or employee based on age, race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, marital status, disability or any other characteristic protected by law. Discrimination can occur under this Policy in either an employment or an educational context. Discrimination also includes failing to provide reasonable accommodations to a qualified person with a disability or to reasonably accommodate an employee’s religious beliefs or practices, as required by state and federal law.

Harassment – unwelcome verbal, visual, physical, electronic, or other conduct based on age, race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, marital status, disability or any other characteristic protected by law that is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive to unreasonably interfere with a person’s ability to participate in or benefit from the College’s education program or activity or to interfere with the terms or conditions of the person’s employment, as judged by a reasonable person in the position of the individual subject to the conduct and considering all the circumstances. A report or complaint may allege conduct meeting this definition by a single individual or a series of acts by a number of individuals (e.g., within a particular office or department) that, when considered together, meets this definition (see definition of “hostile environment” below).

  • Hostile Environment – for purposes of this Policy, a form of harassment (including retaliatory harassment) created by the cumulative effect of such conduct. This includes harassment by a number of individuals, where each individual’s conduct may not be severe, persistent, or pervasive (and therefore warrant disciplinary action) but the cumulative effect of the conduct is; e.g., comments and actions by a number of people in a particular program, office, department, or other organizational unit, with the unit being the respondent.

Sexual Misconduct – an umbrella term used to refer to a range of sex-based conduct prohibited by this Policy, including sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent. Sexual misconduct includes: sexual assault, sexual harassment (including gender-based harassment, sexual exploitation, and hostile environment based on sex), stalking, domestic violence, and dating violence.

Sexual Harassment – unwelcome gender, sexuality or sexually based verbal, visual, physical, electronic, or other conduct.

  • Sexual harassment under Title IX: The Policy prohibits sexual harassment as defined for Title IX purposes, i.e., conduct by one or more individual respondents that, for each respondent, is sufficiently severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive to effectively deny the complainant equal access to the College’s education program or activity; this includes sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking.
  • Sexual harassment under the Policy: The Policy also prohibits sexual harassment that does not meet the Title IX definition but that is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive to unreasonably interfere with a person’s ability to participate in or benefit from the College’s education program or activity or to interfere with the terms or conditions of the person’s employment, as judged by a reasonable person in the position of the individual subject to the conduct and considering all the circumstances. This can take the form of conduct by one or more individual respondents that, for each respondent, meets this definition or it can take the form of a cumulative hostile environment.

Gender-Based Harassment- unwelcome verbal, visual, physical, electronic, or other harassment based on sex, sex-stereotyping, gender identity, or gender expression, even if those acts do not involve conduct of a sexual nature but otherwise meeting the definition of sexual harassment.

Sexual Exploitation – a form of sexual harassment that involves taking advantage of the sexuality and attractiveness of a person without that person’s consent to make a personal gain or profit for oneself or for others. It is the abuse of a position of vulnerability, differential power, or trust for sexual purposes. (e.g., prostituting another person, recording and/or distributing images of sexual activity without consent, threatening to disclose a person’s sexual orientation).

Sexual Assault – Any physical sexual act directed at another person without that person’s consent, including instances where the person is incapable of giving consent. Sexual assault can occur between individuals of the same or different sexes or genders. This includes the following:

  • Rape: the carnal knowledge of a person without their consent, including instances in which the person is incapable of giving consent because of their age or temporary or permanent physical or mental incapacity
  • Sodomy: oral or anal sexual intercourse with another person without their consent, including instances in which the person is incapable of giving consent because of their age or temporary or permanent physical or mental incapacity
  • Sexual assault with an object: to use an object or instrument to unlawfully penetrate however slightly, the genital or anal opening of the body of another person without their consent, including instances in which the person is incapable of giving consent because of their age or temporary or permanent physical or mental incapacity
  • Fondling: the touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification without their consent, including instances where the person is incapable of giving consent because of their age or temporary or permanent mental incapacity
  • Incest: sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law
  • Statutory rape: sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent

Dating Violence – any act of violence or a pattern of abusive behavior committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the person subject to the conduct. Whether there was such relationship will be gauged by the length, type and frequency of interaction between the person’s involved in the relationship. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. For purposes of this definition, dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

Domestic Violence – a felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed against a current or former spouse or intimate partner; a person with whom the respondent shares a child in common; a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the respondent as a spouse or intimate partner; a person similarly situated to a spouse of the respondent under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; or by any other person against an adult or youth who is protected from the person’s act under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

Stalking – a course of conduct (including cyberstalking) on the basis of sex directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for their safety or the safety of others or to suffer substantial emotional distress. A “course of conduct” means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker uses any method, device, or means to follow, monitor, observe, surveil, threaten, or communicate to or about a person, or interfere with a person’s property. Stalking can take place directly, indirectly, or through third parties. A “reasonable person” means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the individual subject to the conduct. “Substantial emotional distress” means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

Retaliation – an adverse action or other form of negative treatment carried out in response to good-faith reporting of or opposition to discrimination or harassment (including sexual misconduct) or participation in the investigation of a complaint. Individuals are also protected from retaliation for making good faith requests for accommodations on the basis of religion or disability. Retaliation can take the form of a discrete or individual act or ongoing harassing conduct.

IV. Related Definitions

Complainant – the person subjected to alleged sexual misconduct.

Complaint – formal notification, either orally or in writing, of the belief that discrimination, harassment, or retaliation has occurred. Also see the definition of “formal complaint” for Title IX sexual misconduct.

Consent – Consent is an affirmative decision to engage in mutually accepted sexual contact or activity. Consent must be informed, freely given, and mutual. Consent consists of an outward demonstration indicating that an individual has freely chosen to engage in sexual activity. Consent is demonstrated through mutually understandable words and/or actions that indicate a willingness to engage freely in sexual activity. Consent may not be inferred from silence, passivity, lack of verbal or physical resistance, or lack of active response alone. Consent to one form of sexual contact does not constitute consent to all forms of sexual contact. Consent can be withdrawn at any time.

  • Consent does not exist if it results from the use or threat of physical force, intimidation, or coercion, or any other factor that a reasonable person would view as eliminating an individual’s ability to exercise their own free will to choose whether or not to have sexual contact.
  • A current or previous dating or sexual relationship, by itself, is not sufficient to constitute consent, and consent to engage in sexual activity with one person does not constitute consent to engage in sexual activity with another.
  • In the state of Michigan, consent cannot be given by minors under the age of 16.
  • A person cannot consent to sexual activity if that person is unable to understand the nature of the activity due to circumstances, including the following:
    • The individual is unconscious, asleep, or otherwise unaware that the sexual activity is occurring.
    • The individual has a mental disability that impairs his/her/their ability to provide consent.
    • The individual is incapacitated (beyond mere drunkenness) due to drug or alcohol consumption, either voluntarily or involuntarily.
    • An individual is incapacitated if they are unaware at the time of the incident of where they are, how they got there, or why or how they became engaged in an act.
    • The perspective of a reasonable person will be the basis for determining whether a respondent knew, or reasonably should have known, whether a complainant was able to freely give consent and whether consent was given. Being intoxicated or incapacitated does not diminish one’s responsibility to obtain consent and will not be an excuse for sexual misconduct.
    • Because faculty members are in positions of authority and influence in regard to students, the Faculty Handbook prohibits intimate relationships between a faculty member and a student, whether or not the student is in the faculty member’s class or department and whether or not the relationship is consensual; intimate relationships are also prohibited between teaching assistants and resident advisors and the students over which they have authority. Similarly, Section 3.2 of the Staff Handbook prohibits intimate relationships between a College official and a staff person under their control, as well as intimate relationships between administrative staff and students. Consensual relationships between a non-supervisory official and a staff person, while not prohibited, must be disclosed to the Human Resources Director so that the Director can take any steps necessary to protect the parties involved and avoid even the appearance of favoritism.
      • In all circumstances in which intimate relationships are prohibited, there is an exception for preexisting relationships. For example, the prohibition would not apply where a faculty member’s spouse or partner enrolls as a student under the College’s tuition assistance program.

Formal Complaint For Title IX purposes, a document filed by a complainant or signed by the Title IX Coordinator under the Procedures for Title IX Sexual Misconduct Complaints in Appendix A alleging sexual misconduct (sexual harassment as defined for Title IX purposes, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking) against an individual respondent and requesting that the College investigate the allegation(s).

Preponderance of the Evidence – the evidence must show that, more likely than not, the alleged discrimination, harassment, or retaliation occurred.

Respondent – the organizational unit (e.g., office, department, program) or person accused of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation.

V. Retaliation

Individuals who report or oppose what they reasonably and in good faith believe to be prohibited discrimination or harassment (including sexual misconduct), or who participate in the College’s investigation and resolution of a complaint, shall not be subject to retaliation for reporting, opposing, and/or participating, even if the College finds that no prohibited discrimination or harassment occurred. Individuals are also protected from retaliation for making good faith requests for accommodations on the basis of religion or disability. Retaliation can take the form of individual or discrete acts (e.g., denial of a promotion or assignment of a failing grade) or a series of harassing acts that, taken together, are sufficiently serious to create a hostile environment by discouraging or chilling a reasonable person from further reporting, opposition, or participation.

If a complainant or other individual who reports or opposes discrimination or harassment, an individual respondent, a witness, or other individual believes that they are being subjected to retaliation, they should promptly contact the Office for Institutional Equity and Inclusion. Complaints of retaliation shall be addressed under the Procedures for Discrimination and Harassment in Appendix B of this Policy.

VI. Supportive Measures in Harassment and Sexual Misconduct Cases

Supportive Measures are non-disciplinary, non-punitive individualized services offered as appropriate, as reasonably available, and without fee or charge to a complainant or an individual respondent in a harassment or sexual misconduct matter. They include measures designed to protect the safety of all parties or the College’s educational environment and to deter further misconduct. Supportive measures may include counseling, extensions of deadlines or other course-related adjustments, transportation modifications, modifications of work or class schedules, campus escort services, mutual restrictions on contact between the parties, changes in work or housing locations, leaves of absence, increased security and monitoring of certain areas of the campus, disability services, health and mental health, services and other similar measures.

VII. Clery Act Obligations

A. Campus Notification

Once a report of harassment or sexual misconduct is made, the College will take all necessary steps to protect the campus and the person who has allegedly been harassed or assaulted. This may include alerting the campus of crimes that it determines pose a threat to members of the campus community. In making such determinations, the College will consider the safety of students, faculty, and staff as well as the privacy interests of all persons involved in such incidents. Regardless of the action taken by the College, the name of any person involved will not appear on security alerts. To respect the privacy rights and choices of the person reporting sexual misconduct, as well as the rights of a person being accused, the College will consider the wishes of all individuals involved in the incident to determine the level of specific information to include in the campus crime report.

Campus Crime Reporting

In compliance with the Clery Act and the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013, all members of the College, excluding confidential sources, notified of sexual misconduct (or certain other possibly criminal acts) are required to inform Campus Safety; and the incident will be included in campus crime statistics. The following information is included: crime, date, location, and status (i.e. student, faculty, staff, stranger, etc.) of the individuals involved in the crime. The College never includes the names of the complainant or the respondent in crime statistics, and the College will not otherwise include personally identifying information about the complainant.

Appendix A
Procedures for Title IX Sexual Misconduct Complaints

These procedures apply to reports and complaints of Title IX sexual misconduct as defined in Section III of the Policy – sexual harassment by one or more individual respondents that, for each respondent, is sufficiently severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive to effectively deny the complainant equal access to the College’s education program or activity, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking.

I. Rights

Rights of the Complainant

When a student, employee, or third party/visitor reports sexual misconduct to the College, whether the conduct occurred on or off-campus (but see Section II of the Policy, Scope, including for Title IX purposes), the College will provide the student, employee, or third party/visitor a written explanation of their rights and options, including:

  • The right to available supportive measures, including how to request them. The College will provide such measures regardless of whether the complainant chooses to report the alleged conduct to Campus Security or local law enforcement, and regardless of whether they file a formal complaint.
  • The right to appropriate resolution of all credible reports of sexual misconduct, including a prompt, fair, and impartial investigation and hearing, where applicable.
  • The right to request confidentiality and to understand the impact of a request for confidentiality on the complaint resolution process.
  • The right to not be discouraged by College officials from reporting sexual misconduct.
  • The right to notify proper law enforcement authorities, including Campus Safety and local police; to be assisted by College authorities in notifying law enforcement authorities if the complainant so chooses; and to decline to notify such authorities.
  • If a student or employee submits a Personal Protection Order (PPO) to Campus Safety, Campus Safety will notify Wayne State or Detroit Police if the PPO is violated.
  • The right not to be retaliated against for filing a good faith report.
  • The right to know the evidentiary standard the College applies during the complaint resolution process is the preponderance of the evidence standard, which means that the evidence must show that more likely than not, sexual misconduct did occur and more likely than not, the respondent committed the act.
  • The right to be informed of the outcome and sanction of any disciplinary hearing involving sexual misconduct within the bounds of what is legally permissible (including by the Family Educational Records Privacy Act).
  • The right to reasonably prompt time frames for completion of the resolution process (generally 90 calendar days), recognizing this is influenced by the facts and circumstances; written notice will be provided for any extension of time frames for good cause, including the reasons for the extension.
  • The right to attend any hearing, including timely notice of hearing date and adequate time for preparation.
  • The right to timely and equal access to any information that will be used during informal and formal disciplinary meetings and hearings.
  • The right to not be questioned about or have prior sexual history admitted as evidence, unless offered to prove that someone other than the respondent committed the alleged conduct or if the questions or evidence concern specific incidents of prior sexual behavior with respect to the respondent and are offered to prove consent.
  • The right to appeal the finding and sanction in accordance with these procedures.
  • The right to have an advisor or advocate of the complainant’s choice accompany and assist in throughout the process.
  • The right to an outcome based solely on the preponderance of reasonably available and relevant evidence presented during the complaint resolution process.
  • The right to written notice of the outcome of the hearing and any sanctions.
  • The right to petition that anyone involved in the complaint resolution process be removed on the basis of demonstrated bias.
  • The right to be informed of available resources for counseling, advocacy, and support.
  • Assurance that the College will take steps to prevent recurrence of any sexual misconduct found to have occurred and when appropriate, remedy the discriminatory effects on the complainant and any others involved/affected.

Rights of the Respondent

  • The right to available supportive measures and how to request them.
  • The right to appropriate resolution to all credible reports of sexual misconduct, including a prompt, fair, and impartial investigation and hearing, where applicable.
  • A presumption that the respondent is not responsible for the alleged conduct until a determination regarding responsibility is made at the conclusion of the complaint resolution process.
  • The right not to be retaliated against for participating in the complaint resolution process.
  • The right to know the evidentiary standard the College applies during an investigation is the preponderance of the evidence standard, which means that the evidence must show that more likely than not, sexual misconduct did occur and more likely than not, the respondent committed the act.
  • The right to a reasonably prompt time frames for completion of the resolution process (generally 90 calendar days), recognizing this is influenced by the facts and circumstances; written notice will be provided for any extension of time frames for good cause, including the reasons for any extension.
  • The right to attend a hearing including timely notice of hearing date and adequate time for preparation.
  • The right to timely and equal access to any information that will be used during informal or formal disciplinary meetings or hearings.
  • The right to have an advisor or advocate accompany and assist throughout the process.
  • The right to an outcome based solely on a preponderance of the reasonably available and relevant evidence presented during the complaint resolution process.
  • The right to written notice of the outcome of the hearing and any sanctions.
  • The right to appeal the finding and sanction in accordance with this Policy.
  • The right to petition that anyone involved in the complaint resolution process be removed on the basis of demonstrated bias.
  • The right to be informed of available resources for counseling, advocacy, and support.

Disability Accommodations: Parties and witnesses with documented disabilities have a right to reasonable disability-related accommodations needed in order to participate in the complaint resolution process. To request such accommodations, students should contact the Dean of Students and employees and others should contact the Human Resources Director.

II. Reporting

All employees, except those designated as confidential resources, are required to report any incidents of possible sexual misconduct of which they become aware to the Title IX Coordinator by phone, email, or in person. This is so the Title IX Coordinator can contact the individual subjected to the alleged misconduct to offer them supportive measures and inform them of their options regarding reporting to law enforcement and filing a formal complaint under this Policy.

Title IX Coordinator
Jody Shipper
Title IX Coordinator
Institutional Equity and Inclusion
313.664.7676
titleix@collegeforcreativestudies.edu

Training provided to the Title IX Coordinator can be found at Title IX Coordinator Training.

Anyone who has been subject to sexual misconduct may choose to pursue criminal prosecution, civil litigation, and/or College disciplinary processes. The College recognizes that a person who has been subject to sexual misconduct retains the right not to pursue either criminal prosecution, civil litigation, or a College resolution proceeding. Choosing not to pursue these courses of action, however, does not remove the responsibility of the College to take action in appropriate circumstances, including offering supportive measures.

The College will keep private the identity of any individual who has made a report or complaint of sex discrimination, been reported to be the perpetrator of sex discrimination, and any witness, except as may be permitted by the Family Education Records Privacy Act and its implementing regulations, as required by law, or to apply this Policy (including in any investigation and hearing). In all cases, to the best of their ability, the Title IX Coordinator will maintain as much privacy as possible for both the complainant and the respondent during the resolution process.

The listed departments are available to help in incidents of sexual misconduct, in conjunction with the Title IX Coordinator:

On Campus Resources for Students

Dean of Students
313.664.7675
M-F 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Campus Safety
313.664.7444
24 Hours

Director of Residence Life
313.664.7678
M-F 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Director of Academic Advising
313.664.7405
M-F 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Registrar
313.664.7671
M-F 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

On Campus Resources for Faculty/Staff

Director of Human Resources
313.664.7650
M-F 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Campus Safety
313.664.7444
24 Hours

Dean of Academic Affairs
313.664.1495
M-F 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Off-Campus Resources for Students and Faculty/Staff

Wayne State Police
313.577.2222
24 Hours

A. Amnesty

When conducting the investigation, the College’s primary focus will be on addressing the sexual misconduct and not on other College Policy violations that may be discovered or disclosed. Fear of conduct or disciplinary violations should not be a deterrent for anyone to report an incident of sexual misconduct. Persons reporting sexual misconduct will be granted amnesty from College disciplinary processes if College alcohol or other non-violent Policy violations are discovered during the course of a sexual misconduct investigation. This same amnesty will be granted to witnesses asked to participate in the complaint resolution process.

B. Timely Reporting & Crisis Assistance

The College supports and encourages anyone who has been subject to sexual misconduct to report the incident to the reporting source of their choice. Prompt reporting may preserve options, including the preservation of physical evidence, crisis counseling, immediate police response. However, anyone can report an incident of sexual misconduct at any time.

Any person who has been sexually assaulted or otherwise subject to sexual violence may go directly to the emergency room of any local hospital for medical attention, evidence collection, and access to follow up care. An individual who has been sexually assaulted is urged to seek medical evaluation as soon as possible. The closest emergency room facilities to campus are:

Detroit Receiving Hospital, 4201 St. Antoine, Detroit MI 48202
Henry Ford Hospital, 2799 W. Grand Blvd, Detroit, MI 48202

C. Medical-Legal Evidence Collection

An individual who has been sexually assaulted is encouraged to request collection of medical-legal evidence. Prompt collection of physical evidence can be helpful should a person later decide to pursue criminal prosecution and/or a civil action, including a protective order.

D. Confidential Reporting Resources

The following resources are available to discuss incidents and issues related to sexual misconduct on a confidential basis. Communications to these resources cannot legally be disclosed without the individual’s consent or in limited circumstances such as when there is an imminent threat or danger to self or others. These resources may report general statistics regarding sexual misconduct but will not disclose any identifying information. A report to these resources will not result in an individual report to the College beyond reporting of such general statistics. However, keep in mind, if an individual reports to these sources and does not report to the College, the College cannot investigate or take any disciplinary action against the respondent.

On-Campus Resources for Students

Wellness Center Staff
313.664.7852
M-F 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Campus Nurse
313.664.7982
M 9 am – 1 pm
Th 12 pm – 4 pm

Off-Campus Resources for Students

Turning Point
586.463.6990
24 Hour Crisis Hotline

Haven
248.334.1274
24 Hour Crisis Hotline

Wayne County SAFE
313.964.9701
24 Hour Crisis Hotline

Off-Campus Resources for Faculty/Staff

Employee Assistance Program – Ulliance
888.333.6269

Turning Point
586.463.6990
24 Hour Crisis Hotline

Haven
248.334.1274
24 Hour Crisis Hotline

Wayne County SAFE
313.964.9701
24 Hour Crisis Hotline

E. Reporting To Law Enforcement

Individuals who report having been subject to sexual violence to the College will be advised of their right to file (or not file) a report with law enforcement.

When the reporting individual is under the age of 16 (or under 21 and physically or mentally impaired), both the College and any confidential resources will report the incident to social service agencies or police in accordance with applicable law and/or at the discretion of school administration when law does not dictate a report.

A report with law enforcement will not preclude the College from conducting its own resolution pursuant to College policies and procedures.

F. Parental/Legal Guardian/Partner Notification

The College is committed to providing support to anyone involved in an incident of sexual misconduct. In some instances when there is a health or safety concern, or where an individual involved is a minor, the College may (or may be required) to notify the parents, guardian, or partner of the individual(s) involved in the incident. In making this determination, and where the College has discretion, the College will consider the wishes of those involved, as well as their personal safety, and the safety of the campus community.

G. False Reports

Any member of the College community who knowingly files a false report of sexual misconduct or harassment, or who knowingly provides false information to or intentionally misleads College officials who are investigating or hearing a report of alleged discrimination, retaliation, sexual misconduct, or harassment, is subject to disciplinary action, up to and including discharge for employees and dismissal for students.

III. Supportive Measures

When the Title IX Coordinator or any College official with authority to institute corrective measures learns of possible sexual misconduct, the Title IX Coordinator will promptly contact the complainant to discuss the availability of supportive measures (with or without the filing of a formal complaint) and explain the process for filing a formal complaint. The Title IX Coordinator will consider the complainant’s wishes as to supportive measures. The Title IX Coordinator will assist all parties in obtaining such measures, and is responsible for coordinating their effective implementation.

Supportive measures are available to both the complainant and the respondent before or after the filing of a complaint with the College or local law enforcement, or if no complaint is filed. Supportive measures may be available even if the alleged conduct does not meet the definitions of sexual misconduct in this Policy. The College will maintain as confidential any supportive measures to the extent that maintaining
such confidentiality would not impair the ability of the College to provide the measures.

In addition to supportive measures offered after the College learns of possible sexual misconduct, the College will provide written notification to the parties about any existing counseling, health, mental health, advocacy, visa and immigration assistance, student financial aid, and other available services, both within the institution and in the community.

The College may remove a student respondent on an emergency basis if the College determines that the respondent poses an immediate threat to the physical health or safety of the complainant or any other student or employee arising from the allegations of sexual harassment. This decision will be made by a team led by the Student Concerns Committee based on an individualized safety and risk analysis, and the respondent will be provided with notice of the decision and an opportunity to challenge the decision by meeting with the Dean of Students immediately following the removal. The Human Resources Director may place a non-student employee respondent on administrative leave during the pendency of a grievance process.

IV. Informal Resolution

After a formal complaint has been filed, the Title IX Coordinator may offer the parties the opportunity to participate in informal resolution through mediation. Mediation is a potential alternative to the formal complaint process if both the respondent and complainant agree. It may be used any time after a formal complaint has been filed but before a determination is made. The parties have the right to end mediation and resume the grievance process at any time prior to agreeing to a resolution. Note that any information disclosed during the mediation process cannot be raised during the investigation or grievance, unless obtained independently from the mediation.

A party interested in mediation should contact the Title IX Coordinator. The Coordinator will provide the parties with written notice disclosing the allegations, the requirements of the informal resolution process, and any consequences resulting from participating in the informal resolution process, including the records that will be maintained or could be shared. Before beginning the mediation process, the parties must provide voluntary, written consent. Mediation cannot be offered to resolve allegations that an employee sexually harassed a student.

Mediation will be facilitated by a trained faculty or administrator. The College will attempt to complete the mediation process within 45 calendar days after the agreement to mediate is signed; this timeframe may be extended for good cause, with written notification provided to the parties of the extension and the reasons for it.

V. Formal Complaints

A formal complaint may be filed with the Title IX Coordinator in person, by mail, or by electronic mail. The complaint must include the complainant’s physical or digital signature, or otherwise indicate that the complainant is the person filing the complaint.

Title IX Coordinator
Jody Shipper
Institutional Equity and Inclusion
313.664.7676
titleix@collegeforcreativestudies.edu

The Title IX Coordinator may also file a complaint if, e.g.:

  • The person subject to the alleged misconduct declines to file or requests to withdraw a complaint but the Coordinator believes the respondent may pose an ongoing threat to the College community.
  • The person subject to the alleged conduct declines to file a complaint but would like an investigation.
  • The identity of the person subject to the alleged misconduct is unknown and an investigation may help determine it.
  • The College has gathered evidence apart from the complainant’s statements and desires to reach a determination regarding the respondent’s responsibility.
  • A determination regarding responsibility provides a benefit to the complainant even where the College lacks control over the respondent and would be unable to issue disciplinary sanctions (see Section V.D below).

However, for the College to proceed with the full resolution process (including imposition of disciplinary measures should a respondent student or employee be found responsible for the alleged misconduct) in a complaint filed by the Title IX Coordinator, the person subject to the alleged misconduct must be willing to participate in the investigation and hearing (except where the College has gathered sufficient evidence to complete the complaint resolution process without information from the complainant).

Formal complaints can be filed as long as the respondent remains a part of the College community. However, the sooner a complaint is filed, the more effectively it can be investigated, e.g., while witnesses are still available, memories are fresh, and documentation may still be available.

The College will evaluate a formal complaint to determine if the alleged conduct constitutes sexual misconduct as defined for Title IX purposes, occurred in the College’s education program or activity, and occurred against a person in the United States. If it did not, the College will dismiss the formal complaint for Title IX purposes and notify the parties in writing. However, if the alleged conduct would otherwise be prohibited by this Policy, the College will continue to address it through the Procedures for Discrimination and Harassment Complaints in Appendix B.

The College may dismiss a formal complaint (or any allegations within the complaint) filed by the person subject to the alleged misconduct if:

  • That person subsequently asks to withdraw it.
  • The respondent is not or is no longer enrolled in or employed by the College (in which case the College may have no way to gather sufficient evidence to make a determination); however, if the respondent subsequently seeks to reenroll or be rehired, the complaint will be reopened and the complaint resolution process completed as a condition for reenrollment/rehire.
  • Other specific circumstances prevent the College from gathering evidence sufficient to reach a determination as to the formal complaint or allegations therein.

In any case in which the College dismisses a formal complaint, the College will provide simultaneous written notice to both parties, including the opportunity to appeal the dismissal as set out in Section VII below.

The investigator and Hearing Officer shall resolve all alleged violations of the Student Code of Conduct, the Staff Handbook, or the Faculty Handbook not involving sexual misconduct that arise from the same set of circumstances as the allegations of sexual misconduct, but will make clear as to which allegations are being considered under the College’s responsibilities under Title IX and which are being addressed under the College’s own requirements.

If a person reports an incident that meets the definition of sexual misconduct but does not personally define the incident as that, the College still has an obligation to provide supportive measures and, if a formal complaint is filed, investigate and hold a hearing.

Members of the College community are expected to cooperate in the College’s investigations and hearings of alleged sexual misconduct. Investigations and hearings will proceed based on reasonably available information. The College, not the parties, bears the burden of proof and the burden of gathering evidence sufficient to reach a determination. The College will not restrict the ability of either party to discuss the allegations under investigation with others or to gather and present relevant evidence.

If a minor is either a complainant or a respondent, the College will notify the minor’s parent(s) of all proceedings in this Policy and allow them to participate in those proceedings.

The complaint resolution process will be completed within a reasonably prompt timeframe—generally, within 90 days of receipt of the complaint. The College may extend this timeframe or any component timeframes for good cause. If the College requires an extension of a timeframe, the College will provide written notice to the complainant and the respondent and provide the reason for the delay.

A. Notice

Upon receipt of a formal complaint of Title IX sexual misconduct (see Section III of the Policy: severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive sexual harassment; sexual assault; dating violence; domestic violence; and stalking), the Title IX Coordinator will provide written notice to the parties who are known that includes:

  1. An explanation of the complaint procedures in this Policy.
  2. A description of the allegations, including sufficient details known at the time and with sufficient time to prepare a response before any initial interview. This will include the identities of the parties involved in the incident, if known; the conduct allegedly constituting sexual misconduct; and the date and location of the alleged incident, if known.
  3. A statement that the respondent is presumed not responsible for the alleged conduct and that a determination regarding responsibility will be made at the conclusion of the investigation and hearing.
  4. An explanation that the parties may have an advisor of their choice (who may be, but is not required to be, an attorney), and that they may inspect and review the evidence obtained during the investigation.
  5. Information about Section V of the Policy, regarding the prohibitions against retaliation and against knowingly making false statements or knowingly submitting false information.

If, in the course of an investigation, the College decides to investigate allegations that are not included in the original notice, the College will provide notice of the additional allegations to the parties whose identities are known.

B. Investigation Standard

Formal complaints of sexual misconduct will be assessed using the preponderance of the evidence standard. The preponderance of the evidence standard means that the evidence must show that, more likely than not, sexual misconduct did occur and more likely than not, the respondent.

C. Investigative Process

All formal complaints of alleged sexual misconduct covered by these procedures are investigated under the general oversight of the Title IX Coordinator; however, the Coordinator will not participate in making any recommendations or determinations. Any party may challenge the participation of the Title IX Coordinator for bias or conflict of interest; such a challenge will be resolved by the Human Resources Director. No party has a right to disqualify the Coordinator absent a demonstrated bias.

The Coordinator will appoint a qualified investigator to conduct the investigation and prepare an investigative report, including recommended findings; training provided to the investigator by the College can be found at Title IX Training. Any party may raise issues of bias or conflict of interest with regard to the investigator. The Title IX Coordinator will weigh these issues and resolve them accordingly. No party has a right to disqualify an investigator absent a demonstrated bias or conflict.
The investigation process includes:

  1. Providing the complainant with the opportunity to meet with the investigator and/or to provide a written statement.
  2. Providing the respondent with the opportunity to meet with the investigator and/or to provide a written statement.
  3. After meeting with the parties and/or obtaining their statements, the investigator will gather and review any additional information and documents the investigator deems relevant, including but not limited to student and personnel files, witness statements, law enforcement and investigation documents, and additional statements from the complainant and the respondent.
    • The investigator will provide an equal opportunity for the parties to present witnesses, including fact and expert witnesses, and other evidence indicating that the respondent is responsible for the alleged conduct as well as indicating that the respondent is not responsible.
    • In any meetings or conversations with the investigator, the parties can be accompanied by an advisor of their choice (who may be, but is not required to be, an attorney). However, an advisor cannot speak for the party they are advising; rather, the advisor’s role will be limited to quietly conferring with the party.
    • The investigator will provide each party with written notice of the date, time, location, participants, and purpose of all investigative interviews or other meetings, with sufficient time for the party to prepare to participate.
    • A party’s records made or maintained by a physician, psychiatrist, psychologist, or other recognized professional or paraprofessional acting in the professional’s or paraprofessional’s capacity, or assisting in that capacity, and which are made and maintained in connection with the provision of treatment to the party, cannot be used in any part of the complaint resolution process unless the College obtains that party’s voluntary, written consent.
    • Questions and evidence about the complainant’s sexual predisposition or prior sexual behavior are not relevant during any part of the complaint resolution process, unless such questions and evidence are offered to prove that someone other than the respondent committed the conduct alleged by the complainant, or if the questions and evidence concern specific incidents of the complainant’s prior sexual behavior with respect to the respondent and are offered to prove consent.
  4. Prior to completion of the investigative report, the College will send to each party and the party’s advisor, if any, all evidence obtained as part of the investigation that is directly related to the allegations raised in the formal complaint.
    • This will include all evidence indicating that the respondent is responsible for the alleged misconduct as well as all evidence indicating that the respondent is not responsible. It will also include evidence upon which the College does not intend to rely in reaching a determination regarding responsibility, whether obtained from a party or other source.
    • It will not include sensitive personally identifying information (e.g., social security numbers, contact information, etc.).
  5. The parties will have 10 calendar days to submit a written response, which the investigator will consider prior to completion of the investigative report.
  6. The investigator will create a report of the investigation that summarizes the relevant evidence and includes recommended findings based on that evidence. Any credibility determinations made by the investigator to support their recommended findings must not be based on a party’s status as a complainant, respondent, or witness.
  7. The College will send to each party and the party’s advisor, if any, the investigative report in an electronic format or a hard copy at least 14 calendar days prior to the hearing. The parties can provide a written response to the report, but must do so no later than four (4) days before the hearing.
  8. The investigation report, including recommended findings and the evidence on which it is based, will be forwarded to the Hearing Officer at the same time it is sent to the parties.
  9. The parties and their advisors can only use the evidence presented to them by the investigator and the investigative report for purposes of the complaint process; they cannot copy, photograph, download, disclose, or disseminate these materials to anyone else.
  10. Either party involved in the investigation may request a written update at any point from the Title IX Coordinator.

D. Non-Student And Non-Employee Cases

In complaints in which the respondent is not a student or employee of the College, the investigator will prepare a written summary of the investigation, make findings of fact, determine if College Policy has been violated and, if so, recommend suitable action to appropriate College officials. Ultimately it is up to the College official to determine if and how to implement the investigator’s recommendations.

VI. Hearing

A. Standard

The Hearing Officer will determine if it is more likely than not that the respondent committed the alleged misconduct. This determination will be made based on an objective evaluation of all reasonably available and relevant evidence, including evidence indicating that the respondent is responsible for the alleged misconduct as well as evidence indicating that the respondent is not responsible.

B. Hearing Officer

The Title IX Coordinator will appoint a qualified individual to serve as the Hearing Officer. The Hearing Officer will make a final determination on the case based on the investigative report and the evidence on which it is based. Training provided to the Hearing Officer by the College can be found at Title IX Training.

Any party may raise issues of bias or conflicts of interest with regard to the Hearing Officer. The Title IX Coordinator will weigh these issues and resolve them accordingly. No party has a right to disqualify a Review Board member absent a demonstrated bias.

C. Hearing Process

  1. The College may, at its discretion, arrange for the hearing to be conducted in person or through videoconferencing (so that the Hearing Officer and parties can simultaneously see and hear each other or witnesses as they present their information and answer questions); however, if either party requests the use of videoconferencing, the College must provide it.
  2. The Hearing Officer has general authority over the conduct of the hearing, including the authority to set time frames for witness testimony and limit the length of any opening/closing statements.
  3. A respondent, complainant, advisor, and/or witness may not use electronic devices that capture or facilitate communication (e.g., computer, cell phone, audio/video recorder, etc.) during a hearing, unless authorized by the Hearing Officer.
  4. The general course of procedure for a hearing is as follows: introductions; respondent’s statement accepting or denying responsibility; questioning of each party by the Hearing Officer and the other party; testimony/questioning of other material witnesses (if applicable); any closing comments from the complainant; and any closing comments from the respondent.
  5. The parties can be accompanied to the hearing and any related meeting or proceeding by the advisor of their choice (who may be, but is not required to be, an attorney); a party’s witness can also serve as the party’s advisor. However, except for purposes of cross-examination (explained below), the advisor cannot speak for the party they are advising; rather, the advisor’s role will be limited to quietly conferring with the party.
  6. The Hearing Officer will provide an equal opportunity for the parties to present witnesses, including fact and expert witnesses, and other evidence provided and obtained during the investigation indicating that the respondent is responsible for the alleged conduct as well as indicating that the respondent is not responsible.
  7. The Hearing Officer will make all the evidence gathered during the investigation available to each party at the hearing.
  8. The Hearing Officer and/or the parties can call the investigator as a witness. However, the investigator may not testify as to statements made by others, including the complainant or respondent, if the individual who made a statement does not submit to cross-examination.
  9. Each party’s advisor may ask the other party and any witnesses all relevant questions and relevant follow-up questions, including those challenging credibility.
    • Before a complainant, respondent, or witness answers a cross-examination or other question, the Hearing Officer will first determine whether the question is relevant and explain any decision to exclude a question as not relevant.
    • If a party does not have an advisor present at the hearing, the College will provide the party with an advisor of the College’s choice at no charge to conduct cross- examination on behalf of that party. The advisor’s role is limited to relaying a party’s own questions to the other party or witness. The advisor need not have any particular skill or qualification to serve in this role.
    • If a party or witness does not submit to cross-examination at the hearing, the Hearing Officer will not rely on any statement of that party or witness in reaching a determination regarding responsibility. The Hearing Officer will not draw an inference about the determination regarding responsibility based solely on a party’s or witness’s absence from the hearing or refusal to answer cross-examination or other questions.
  10. Any credibility determinations made by the Hearing Officer to support their findings must not be based on a party’s status as a complainant, respondent, or witness.
  11. The College will create an audio recording and/or transcript, of the hearing and make it available to the parties for inspection and review.
  12. After the hearing, the Hearing Officer will issue a written determination regarding responsibility. The Hearing Officer has an independent obligation to objectively evaluate relevant evidence and cannot simply defer to recommendations made by the investigator in the investigative report.
  13. Should the Hearing Officer determine that the respondent violated the Sexual Misconduct Policy, the Hearing Officer will refer the case to the appropriate College official for determinations of sanctions and remedies (see Section VI.E below) before issuance of the Notice of Outcome.

D. Notice Of Outcome

The Notice of Outcome prepared by the Hearing Officer will inform the parties regarding the outcome of the hearing. The Notice, which shall be provided simultaneously and in writing to both the complainant and the respondent, will include:

  1. Identification of the allegations potentially constituting sexual misconduct.
  2. A description of the procedural steps taken from the receipt of the formal complaint through the determination, including any notifications to the parties, interviews with parties and witnesses, site visits, methods used to gather other evidence, and the hearing.
  3. Findings of fact supporting the determination.
  4. Conclusions regarding the application of the Policy to the facts.
  5. A statement of, and rationale for, the result as to each allegation, including a determination regarding responsibility.
  6. Any disciplinary sanctions for the respondent (see Section VI.E below).
  7. Whether remedies designed to restore or preserve equal access to the College’s education program or activity will be provided to the complainant; only the Notice of Outcome issued to the complainant will specify what the remedies are.
  8. The procedures and permissible bases for the complainant and respondent to appeal.

The determination regarding responsibility becomes final either on the date that the College provides the parties with the written determination of the result of the appeal, if an appeal is filed, or if an appeal is not filed, the date on which an appeal would no longer be considered timely.

E. Sanctions/Remedies

Sanctions for student respondents found responsible for sexual misconduct under this Policy will be determined by the Dean of Students and included in the Notice of Outcome. Sanctions for employee
respondents found responsible for sexual misconduct will be determined by the Human Resources Director and included in the Notice of Outcome. The range of sanctions against a respondent found responsible for sexual misconduct under this Policy include but are not limited to institutional probation, no contact orders, counseling, training or other developmental assignments, removal from class(es), housing, or suspension/dismissal/termination from the institution.

Remedies for student and third party/visitor complainants (where the third party/visitor was participating in or attempting to participate in a College program or activity) will be determined by the Dean of Students; remedies for employees will be determined by the Human Resources Director. Remedies can include, but are not limited, to housing changes, changes in grades (e.g., where a student-complainant was assigned a low grade as part of the harassment), counseling services, medical services, promotion (e.g., where an employee-complainant was denied a promotion as part of the harassment), reenrollment, reinstatement, academic support services, and other measures designed to put the complainant in the position they would have been in had the harassment not occurred.

Remedies for the broader College population will be determined by the Title IX Coordinator and can include, but are not limited to, developing educational materials on sexual misconduct and this Policy for students and/or employees, increased security, conducting bystander intervention and sexual violence prevention programs, and/or issuing Policy statements.

VII. Appeals

A. General

Both the complainant and the respondent will be notified simultaneously and in writing of the following procedures for the respondent and the complainant to appeal the result of the hearing:

  1. Both the complainant and the respondent are entitled to appeal the decision of the Hearing Officer.
  2. An appeal must be filed, in writing, within five (5) calendar days of the written Notification of Outcome. The appeal should be turned in to the Title IX Coordinator.
  3. Appeals of complaints in which a student is accused of sexual misconduct by another student or by a visitor/third party will be heard by the Human Resources Director. Appeals of complaints in which an employee is accused of sexual misconduct by another employee or by a third-party will be heard by the Dean of Students. Appeals of cases in which a student is accused of sexual misconduct by an employee or in which an employee is accused of sexual misconduct by a student will be heard by a qualified external reviewer. Training provided to the appellate officers can be found at Title IX Training.
  4. Any party may raise issues of bias or conflict of interest with regard to the Appellate Officer. The Title IX Coordinator will weigh these issues and resolve them accordingly. No party has a right to disqualify an Appellate Officer absent a demonstrated bias or conflict.
  5. The grounds for appeal are:
    • New evidence not reasonably available at the time the determination regarding responsibility or dismissal was made that could affect the outcome.
    • The Title IX Coordinator, investigator(s), or decision-maker(s) had a demonstrated conflict of interest or bias for or against complainants or respondents generally or the individual complainant or respondent that affected the outcome of the matter.
    • Procedural irregularities that affected the outcome.
  6. All decisions by the Appellate Officer are final.

B. Appellate Process

  1. The Appellate Officer will first determine whether the appeal meets the grounds for appeal. If the appeal is not based on a proper ground for appeal, it may be rejected. If so, the Appellate Officer will notify all parties within 10 business days of the appeal filing that the appeal will not be reviewed.
  2. If the appeal satisfies the grounds for appeal, the Appellate Officer will notify the other party within five (5) calendar days of receipt of the appeal and provide them an opportunity to respond to the appeal within the next five (5) calendar days.
  3. The Appellate Office will make a finding on the appeal within 15 business days of the appeal being filed, unless extended for good cause. If the timeframe for the decision is to be extended, the Appellate Officer will notify the parties of the extension and the reasons for it.
  4. The complainant and the respondent will be notified simultaneously and in writing of the result of the appeal and the reasons for the result.

VIII. Recordkeeping

The College will create, and maintain for a period of seven years, records of each sexual harassment investigation, including:

  • any informal resolution and the result therefrom
  • any determination regarding responsibility and any audio or audiovisual recording or transcript
  • any disciplinary sanctions imposed on the respondent
  • any remedies provided to the complainant
  • any appeal and the result therefrom

The College will also create, and maintain for a period of seven years, any actions, including any supportive measures, taken in response to all reports or formal complaints of sexual misconduct. If the College does not provide a complainant with supportive measures, the College will document the reasons why such a response was not clearly unreasonable in light of the known circumstances.

Appendix B
Procedures for Discrimination and Harassment Complaints

These procedures apply to reports and complaints of discrimination, harassment, and retaliation as defined in Section III of the Policy, except those involving Title IX sexual misconduct (which are handled under Appendix A, Procedures for Title IX Sexual Misconduct Complaints). They also apply to reports and complaints of retaliation.

I. Rights

Rights Of the Complainant

When an applicant, student, employee, or visitor or other third party (when the visitor/third party is participating or attempting to participate in a College program or activity) files a discrimination or retaliation complaint, the College will provide the complainant a written explanation of their rights, including:

  • The right to a prompt, fair, and impartial investigation of all credible complaints.
  • The right to not be discouraged by College officials from filing a complaint.
  • The right not to be retaliated against for filing a complaint in good faith.
  • The right to know the evidentiary standard the College applies during the complaint resolution process is the preponderance of the evidence standard.
  • The right to reasonably prompt time frames for completion of the investigation process (generally 60 calendar days), recognizing this is influenced by the facts and circumstances; written notice will be provided for any extension of time frames for good cause, including the reasons for any extension.
  • The right to have an advisor or advocate of the complainant’s choice accompany and assist throughout the complaint resolution process.
  • The right to an outcome based solely on the preponderance of reasonably available and relevant evidence presented during the complaint resolution process.
  • The right to petition that anyone involved in the complaint resolution process be removed on the basis of demonstrated bias.
  • The right to be informed of the outcome and sanction within the bounds of what is legally permissible.
  • The right to appeal the finding and sanction in accordance with this Policy.
  • Assurance that the College will take steps to prevent recurrence of any discrimination, harassment, or retaliation and, when appropriate, to remedy the discriminatory effects on the complainant and others involved/affected.

The above explanation of rights will also be provided to an applicant, student, employee, or visitor or other third party (regardless of whether the visitor/third party is participating or attempting to participate in a College program or activity) who files a complaint of harassment, as well as the following information:

  • Options for available assistance in and how to request supportive measures. The College will provide such measures regardless of whether the complainant chooses to report the alleged conduct to Campus Security or local law enforcement.
  • For harassing conduct that might be criminal in nature, the option to notify proper law enforcement authorities, including Campus Safety and local police.
  • If a student or employee submits a Personal Protection Order (PPO) to Campus Safety, Campus Safety will notify Wayne State or Detroit Police if the PPO is violated.

Information for The Respondent

When the respondent is associated with the College, the respondent will be provided with the following information:

  • The right to a prompt, fair, and impartial investigation of all credible complaints.
  • The right to know the evidentiary standard the College applies during an investigation is the preponderance of the evidence standard, which means that the evidence must show that more likely than not, the alleged discrimination, harassment, or retaliation did occur.
  • A presumption that the respondent is not responsible for the alleged conduct until a determination regarding responsibility is made at the conclusion of the complaint resolution process.
  • The right to a reasonably prompt time frame for completion of the resolution process (generally 60 calendar days), recognizing this is influenced by the facts and circumstances; written notice will be provided for any extension of time frames for good cause, including the reasons for any extension.
  • The right to an outcome based solely on a preponderance of the reasonably available and relevant evidence presented during the complaint resolution process.
  • The right to written notice of the outcome and sanction of the hearing.
  • The right to appeal the finding and sanction in accordance with this Policy.
  • The right to petition that anyone involved in the complaint resolution process be removed on the basis of demonstrated bias.
  • For individual respondents:
    • Options for available assistance in and how to request supportive measures.
    • The right not to be retaliated against for participating in the complaint resolution process.
    • The right to have an advisor or advocate accompany and assist throughout the process.

Disability accommodations: Parties and witnesses with documented disabilities have a right to reasonable disability-related accommodations needed in order to participate in the complaint resolution process. To request such accommodations, students should contact the Dean of Students and employees and others should contact the Human Resources Director.

II. Supportive Measures in Harassment Matters

Students and employees of the College can contact the Office for Institutional Equity and Inclusion to request supportive measures. Supportive measures are available to a complainant before or after the filing of a complaint or where no complaint has been filed, and to an individual respondent after a complaint has been filed.

III. Complaints

Complaints of discrimination, harassment, and retaliation can be filed with the Office for Institutional Equity and Inclusion or Office of Human Resources.

Jody Shipper
Title IX Coordinator
Institutional Equity and Inclusion
313.664.7676
titleix@collegeforcreativestudies.edu

Raquel Diroff
Human Resources Director
Office of Human Resources
313-664-7651
rdiroff@collegeforcreativestudies.edu

Complaints of discrimination (including discrete acts of retaliation) must be filed within one (1) year of the date of the alleged discrimination. Complaints of harassment (including retaliatory harassment) can be filed as long as the respondent remains a part of the College community. However, the sooner a complaint is filed, the more effectively it can be investigated, e.g., while witnesses are still available, memories are fresh, and documentation may still be available.

The College may dismiss a complaint (or any allegations within the complaint) if:

  • The complainant subsequently asks to withdraw it;
  • In harassment cases, the respondent is not or is no longer enrolled in or employed by the College (in which case the College may have no way to gather sufficient evidence to make a determination); however, if the respondent subsequently seeks to reenroll or be rehired, the complaint may be reopened and the complaint resolution process completed as a condition for reenrollment/rehire.

In any case in which the College dismisses a complaint, the College will provide simultaneous written notice to both parties, including the opportunity to appeal as set out in Section V below.

The College will utilize all relevant internal disciplinary and administrative processes, as well as external criminal and civil reporting mechanisms, deemed appropriate when information pertaining to discrimination, harassment, or retaliation is reported. The investigator shall resolve all alleged violations of the Student Code of Conduct, the Staff Handbook, or the Faculty Handbook arising from the same set of circumstances as the allegations of conduct prohibited by the Policy.

Members of the College community are expected to cooperate in the College’s investigations. Investigations will proceed based on reasonably available information. The College will not restrict the ability of either party to discuss the allegations under investigation with others or to gather and present relevant evidence. If a minor is either a complainant or a respondent, the College will notify the minor’s parent(s) of all proceedings in this Policy and allow them to participate in those proceedings.

Any member of the College community who knowingly files a false report of sexual misconduct or harassment, or who knowingly provides false information to or intentionally misleads College officials who are investigating or hearing a report of alleged discrimination, retaliation, sexual misconduct, or harassment, is subject to disciplinary action, up to and including discharge for employees and dismissal for students.

The investigation and resolution of a complaint will be completed within a reasonably prompt timeframe— generally, within 60 days of receipt of the complaint. The College may extend this timeframe or any component timeframes for good cause. If the College requires an extension of a timeframe, the College will provide written notice to the complainant and respondent and provide the reason for the delay.

A. Notice

Upon receipt of a complaint covered by Appendix B, the Office for Institutional Equity and Inclusion will provide written notice to the complainant and to the respondent that includes:

  1. An explanation of the complaint procedures.
  2. A description of the allegations.
  3. For harassment complaints, a statement that the individual respondent is presumed not responsible for the alleged conduct and that a determination regarding responsibility will be made at the conclusion of the investigation and hearing.
  4. An explanation that any parties to a complaint may have an advisor of their choice (who may be, but is not required to be, an attorney).
  5. Information about Section V of the Policy, regarding the prohibitions against retaliation and against knowingly making false statements or knowingly submitting false information.

If, in the course of an investigation, the Office decides to investigate allegations that were not included in the original notice, the Office will provide written notice of the additional allegations.

B. Investigation Standard

Complaints under these procedures will be assessed using the preponderance of evidence standard — the evidence must show that, more likely than not, the alleged discrimination, harassment, or retaliation did occur.

C. Investigative Process

Complaints of alleged discrimination, harassment, and retaliation covered by these procedures are investigated under the oversight of the Office for Institutional Equity and Inclusion and, where employees are involved, the Office of Human Resources. The Office for Institutional Equity and Inclusion will appoint a qualified investigator to conduct the investigation and prepare an investigative report. The parties to a complaint may raise issues of bias or conflict of interest with regard to the investigator or anyone from the College involved in conducting or managing the complaint resolution process. The Office for Institutional Equity and Inclusion will weigh these issues and resolve them accordingly. No party has a right to disqualify an individual involved in the complaint resolution process absent a demonstrated bias or conflict.

The investigation process includes:

  1. Providing the complainant with the opportunity to meet with the investigator and/or to provide a written statement.
  2. Providing the respondent with the opportunity to meet with the investigator and/or to provide a written statement.
  3. After meeting with the complainant and the respondent or receiving their written statements, the investigator will gather and review any additional information and documents the investigator deems relevant, including but not limited to student and personnel files, witness statements, law enforcement and investigation documents, and additional statements from the complainant and the respondent. In any meetings or conversations with the investigator, any party to a complaint can be accompanied by an advisor of their choice (who may be, but is not required to be, an attorney). However, an advisor cannot speak for the party they are advising; rather, the advisor’s role will be limited to quietly conferring with the party.
  4. The investigator will create a preliminary investigation report summarizing the relevant evidence collected.
  5. The preliminary investigation report will be provided to the complainant and the respondent, with five (5) business days to respond with any information they deem to be incorrect or incomplete, or to provide additional information that they believe should be included.
  6. The investigator will address the parties’ responses to the preliminary investigation report and conduct additional investigation if warranted. If the investigator collects additional evidence, the investigator will give the parties an opportunity to review and respond.
  7. The investigator will then create a final investigation report which will contain recommended findings.
  8. The final investigation report will be forwarded to the Review Board for final determination.
  9. The complainant and respondent may request a written update at any point from the Office for Institutional Equity and Inclusion.

IV. Review Board

A. Standard

The purpose of the Review Board is to determine if, more likely than not, discrimination, harassment, or retaliation occurred. This determination is made by the Review Board as an outcome of the Review Board process outlined in section IV.C.

B. Review Board

The Review Board will make a final determination on the case based on the report prepared by the investigator. The Review Board will be comprised of three members. Depending on the allegations in the complaint and the individuals involved, the Review Board may be comprised of the Assistant Dean for Institutional Equity and Inclusion, Human Resources Director, Dean of Students, Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services, and Vice President for Administration and Finance.

Any party may raise issues of conflicts of interest with regard to the Review Board. The Office for Institutional Equity and Inclusion will weigh these issues and resolve them accordingly. No party has a right to disqualify a Review Board member absent a demonstrated bias.

C. Review Board Process

The Review Board will review the final investigation report to determine whether:

  1. The investigation was conducted in a fair, impartial, and reliable manner;
  2. The information is sufficient and supports the factual findings; and
  3. There is a rational basis, applying the preponderance of evidence standard, for the recommended finding(s).

In reaching a determination the Review Board may elect to meet with the investigator, but may not conduct its own investigation.

After the Review Board has concluded its review of the final investigation report and any additional information requested about the investigation, the Review Board shall either affirm or reject the investigator’s finding(s). Should the Review Board reject the investigation report in whole or in part, the Review Board may:

  1. Modify the investigation report accordingly;
  2. Request that further investigation be undertaken by the same or another investigator;
  3. Request that a de novo investigation be conducted.

If the Review Board determines that the investigator properly concluded that there is insufficient information to find, by a preponderance of the evidence, that a Policy violation occurred, the Review Board will affirm the finding.

If the Review Board determines that the investigator properly concluded that there is sufficient information to find, by a preponderance of the evidence, that a Policy violation occurred, the Review Board will coordinate with other College officials regarding any remedies to be provided to the complainant and, in cases of harassment, any sanctions for the respondent (see Section IV.E below). These measures will be designed to eliminate the discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation, prevent its reoccurrence, and remedy its effects. Sanctions or interventions may also serve to promote safety or deter individuals from similar future behavior.

D. Notice Of Outcome

The Notice of Outcome prepared by the Review Board will inform the complainant and the respondent of the outcome of an investigation. The Notice, which shall be provided simultaneously and in writing to all involved, will contain: (1) whether the alleged discrimination, harassment, or retaliation occurred, (2) to the extent permitted by the Family Education Records Privacy Act (FERPA), any individual sanctions imposed, (3) other steps the College has taken to prevent further violations of the Policy, and (4) any appeal rights as described in Section V below. The Notice of Outcome provided to the complainant will identify any individual remedies offered to them.

E. Sanctions/Remedies

Remedies for student and third party/visitor complainants (where the third party/visitor is participating in or attempting to participate in a College program or activity) will be determined by the Dean of Students; remedies for employees will be determined by the Human Resources Director. Remedies can include, but are not limited, to housing changes, changes in grades, counseling services, medical services, promotion (e.g., where an employee-complainant was denied a promotion as part of the harassment), enrollment or reenrollment, reinstatement, academic support services, and other measures designed to put the complainant in the position they would have been in had the discrimination, harassment, or retaliation not occurred.

In cases of harassment (including retaliatory harassment), sanctions for student respondents will be determined by the Dean of Students and included in the Notice of Outcome to the extent permitted by FERPA. Sanctions for employee respondents will be determined by the Human Resources Director and included in the Notice of Outcome. The range of sanctions under this Policy include, but are not limited to, institutional probation, no contact orders, counseling, training or other developmental assignments, removal from class(es), housing, or suspension/dismissal/termination from the institution.

Remedies for the broader College population will be determined by the Office for Institutional Equity and Inclusion and can include, but are not limited, to developing educational materials on discrimination, harassment, and retaliation and this Policy for students and/or employees; increased security; conducting bystander intervention and prevention programs; and/or issuing Policy statements.

V. Appeals

A. Procedure

Both the complainant and, in cases of harassment, the individual respondent are entitled to appeal the decision of the Review Board. The Notice of Outcome will include the following information:

  1. An appeal must be filed, in writing, within 5 business days of the written Notification of Outcome. The appeal should be turned in to the Assistant Dean, Office for Institutional Equity and Inclusion.
  2. The College leadership team (President, Provost, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Vice President of Enrollment and Student Services, Vice President of Administration and Finance, and Vice President of Institutional Advancement) will serve as the Appeal Body unless they participated in the Review Board determinations. A member of the leadership team may also recuse themselves if a relationship with a party would compromise the impartiality of the appeal. Any party may raise issues of conflicts of interest with regard to the Appeal Body. The Assistant Dean, Office for Institutional Equity and Inclusion, will weigh these issues and resolve them accordingly. No party has a right to disqualify an Appeal Body member absent a demonstrated bias.
  3. The Appeal Body will first determine whether the appeal meets the grounds for appeal in Section V.B below. If the appeal is not based on a proper ground for appeal, it may be rejected. If so, the Appeal Body will notify all parties within 10 calendar days of the appeal filing that the appeal will not be reviewed.
  4. If the appeal satisfies the grounds for appeal, the Appeal Body will make a finding on the appeal within 15 business days of the appeal being filed. The complainant and, in cases of harassment, the individual respondent will be notified simultaneously and in writing of the results and when such results become final. If the timeframe for the decision is to be extended, the Appeal Body will notify the parties of the extension and the reasons for it.
  5. All decisions by the Appeal Body are final.

In cases in which a College office, department, or other organizational unit was accused of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation, that unit cannot appeal a finding of a violation of this Policy or of the remedies imposed.

B. Grounds For Appeal

  1. New evidence not reasonably available at the time the decision regarding dismissal or violation of the Policy was made that could affect the outcome.
  2. Those involved in the complaint resolution process had a conflict of interest or bias that affected the outcome of the matter.
  3. Procedural irregularities that substantially affected the outcome.

Field Trips

From time to time, a faculty member will want to take a group of students on a field trip. All students must sign a waiver of liability form covering the trip. These forms may be obtained from the Office of Student Life or from the Program Manager. Once completed, two copies of the liability waiver should be made; the original is kept in the department and the copy taken on the trip with the chaperone. Faculty are responsible for providing a digital version of all field trip release forms to their Program Manager at least 24 hours before the scheduled field trip. Whether traveling locally or long distance, transportation should be organized through a reputable carrier. If traveling by motor vehicle, it is preferable to hire a bus or van, with a properly licensed driver. In this case, the company providing transportation must furnish proof of current insurance. It is not permissible for faculty to use personal vehicles to transport students nor may faculty solicit students to transport other students.

Out-of-town accommodations must be made at reputable establishments. Reservations should be confirmed in writing, and if the hotel insists on a contract being signed, it must be reviewed and signed for CCS by the Vice President for Administration and Finance.

Funding for field trips comes from the involved students and the department; if additional funding is required, the faculty may submit student or faculty development requests to the Office of Academic Affairs after receiving approval from the Department Chair. All monies due from students for a given trip must be paid to CCS before leaving on the trip, with no exceptions. The Business Office will handle paying the bills and issuing travel advances to the faculty members. Subsequent to the trip, proper accounting, including all appropriate receipts, must be made of all funds expended. The forms to be used in this accounting may be obtained from the Business Office.

Related Policy

Chaperone Policy

Code of Student Conduct

The Code of Student Conduct is in place to ensure students are aware of the behavior expected of them as members of the CCS community. The purpose of this Code is to create an environment that fosters civility, personal responsibility, and mutual respect of others and their differences.

Any student who commits a violation of the Code of Student Conduct is subject to disciplinary sanction, up to and including dismissal from CCS. The following actions/behaviors shall constitute violations of the Code of Student Conduct:

  1. Violating published CCS policies, rules, or regulations including, but not limited to, the policies on nondiscrimination, sexual harassment, smoking, drugs/controlled substance and alcohol.
  2. Violating federal, state or local laws on CCS premises or while in attendance at CCS sponsored, approved, or supervised events/programs or committing off-campus violations of federal, state or local law that adversely affect CCS, the pursuit of its objectives and/or a CCS community member (defined as, but not limited to: administrators, faculty, staff, students, guests, visitors, vendors or contractors).
  3. Committing acts of sexual assault (stranger, date, or acquaintance rape), or other forms of coerced sexual activity.
  4. Engaging in acts of physical abuse and/or actions that intimidate, harass, threaten, coerce, or otherwise endanger the health and safety of one’s self or another.
  5. Engaging in disorderly conduct or fighting, which is defined to include, but is not limited to, behaviors which are viewed as intoxicated, lewd, indecent, obscene, slanderous or threatening to others.
  6. Interrupting or disturbing the day-to-day academic and operational functions of CCS or committing intentional acts that obstruct, disrupt, or physically interfere with the use of CCS premises, buildings, or passages.
  7. Possessing, duplicating, or using keys/IDs to any CCS building or facility without authorization by appropriate CCS officials or committing an act of unauthorized entry into or use of CCS buildings or facilities by use of key, ID card or force.
  8. Engaging or participating in acts of unauthorized possession, use, removal, defacing, tampering, damage, or destruction of CCS owned or leased property, equipment, computer programs, or materials, or that of any CCS community member.
  9. Posting, affixing, or otherwise attaching unauthorized written or printed messages or materials, e.g. posters, signs, handbills, brochures, or pamphlets. Posting, affixing, or otherwise attaching authorized afore mentioned materials on or in unauthorized places including but not limited to trees, shrubbery, sidewalks, buildings, and lawn areas without permission from the appropriate CCS official.
  10. Engaging or participating in unauthorized possession or use of explosives, firearms, dangerous weapons, or other hazardous objects or substances. Weapons, explosives, and other hazardous objects or substances covered by this regulation shall include, but not be limited to, the following:
    • all handguns, rifles, and shotguns;
    • all longbows, crossbows, and arrows;
    • all knives having a blade length of three inches or more that are not solely used for the purpose of creating art or for the preparation and eating of meals;
    • all BB guns, pellet guns, air/CO2 guns, blow guns, paint guns, splat balls and altered toy guns;
    • all fireworks;
    • all explosives, laboratory chemicals, dangerous compounds, gunpowder, firearm ammunition, and flammable petroleum fuels;
    • any martial arts weapons, e.g., numb chucks and throwing stars;
    • any substance that is considered poisonous:
    • any item used as a weapon in the commission of a crime; and
    • any operative animal trap or other device that is used to ensnare animals.
  11. Committing acts of arson, creating a fire hazard, or possessing or using, for purposes other than academic, inflammable materials or hazardous substances on CCS property, or failing to properly store, use, clean-up and dispose of hazardous substances that have been approved for academic use.
  12. Committing acts that endanger the property of CCS (including but not limited to altering or misusing any firefighting equipment, safety equipment, or emergency device).
  13. Making false reports of a fire, bomb threat, or other dangerous condition; failing to report a fire, or interfering with the response of CCS or municipal officials to emergency calls.
  14. Failing to comply with the directions of CCS officials acting in the performance of their duties and/or failing to positively identify oneself to a CCS official when requested to do so. The preferred form of identification shall be a current, valid CCS identification card.
  15. Aiding and abetting another person in committing an act that violates the Code of Student Conduct.
  16. Committing acts of dishonesty including but not limited to the following:
    • engaging or participating in cheating, plagiarism, or other forms of academic dishonesty (students committing acts of academic dishonesty are also subject to academic sanctions).
    • furnishing false information to any CCS official/office or outside source regarding CCS or a CCS community member.
    • forging, altering, or misusing any CCS document, record, or instrument of identification.
    • tampering with the election of any CCS-recognized student organization.
    • attempting to represent CCS, any recognized student organization, or any official CCS group without the explicit prior consent of the officials of that group.
  17. Gambling on CCS property or engaging in unauthorized canvassing or solicitation.
  18. Engaging in acts of theft, misuse or abuse of the CCS computer network, including but not limited to:
    • unauthorized entry into a file, to use, read, or change its contents.
    • unauthorized transfer, deletion or storage of a file(s).
    • unauthorized use of another person’s login/password.
    • use of computing facilities/networks to interfere with the work of another.
    • use of computing facilities/networks to send inappropriate or obscene messages.
    • use of computing facilities/networks to interfere with the normal operation of CCS.
  19. Possessing, distributing or being under the influence of cannabis (marijuana) or any State or Federally controlled substance except as expressly permitted by law.
  20. Possessing, distributing or being under the influence alcohol except as expressly permitted by law and CCS policy.
  21. Engaging or participating in abuse of the campus judicial system, including but not limited to:
    • falsifying or misrepresenting information before a CCS official.
    • disrupting or interfering with the orderly conduct of a judicial proceeding.
    • instituting a judicial complaint knowingly without cause.
    • attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in, or use of, the judicial proceeding.
    • attempting to influence the impartiality of a CCS official prior to, during, and/or after a judicial proceeding.
    • harassing (verbal or physical) and/or intimidating a CCS official prior to, during, and/or after a judicial proceeding.
    • failing to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under the Code of Student Conduct.
    • influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the campus judicial system.
  22. Planning, directing, or committing acts of hazing, defined as any activity which willfully or recklessly endangers the physical or mental health of an individual or subjects an individual to ridicule, embarrassment, or unlawful activity for the purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in, an officially or unofficially recognized group or organization.
  23. Committing violations of rules and regulations duly established and promulgated by other CCS departments.
  24. Desktop (non-portable) vaporizers are not permitted to be used inside CCS Academic Facilities or Residence Halls. Portable vaporizers are permitted to be used in common areas of the building provided that the do not create a distraction or nuisance to the educational environment or other CCS community members.
  25. Failure to comply with the policies implemented to mitigate COVID-19 pandemic spread. Violations could include, but not limited to: failure to wear a mask in public areas, failure to adhere to social distancing guidelines, violation of COVID-19 specific guest policies, failure to self-isolate when directed to do so, etc.